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February 22nd, 2013 | Author: David

Nuclear Weapons (Feedback)

Thanks for all your comments. I guess no one really wants nuclear weapons, but when you have a basket-case of a country like North Korea developing them, it is understandable that some Japanese people feel that they need more than just a promise of protection from the United States.

Here is some feedback on your comments.

If Nuclear weapons were used in war, it means that cities were destroyed completely and many people were killed like Nagasaki and Hiroshima.
If nuclear weapons were used in war, cities would be completely destroyed, and many people would be killed, like in Nagasaki and Hiroshima. (A-Z: if / when)

Many Japanese people may think that Japan should not make their Nuclear weapons,…
“make nuclear weapons” or “make their own nuclear weapons” (A-Z: my car)

She used to say to her children to live with integrity.
She used to tell her children to live with integrity. (A-Z: say / tell)

“The war is over. Everybody should dwell in peace.”
I agree with your grandmother. The problem is what to do when others threaten you.

So, my opinion is that any country shouldn’t have Nuclear weapons and never use them,
So, my opinion is that no countries should use or even develop nuclear weapons. (A-Z: negative sentence word order)

Many people say that having nuclear weapons works as a deterrent, and keeps the power balance between the nations.
Nice sentence, but you don’t need “the” before “nations” because you are referring to the whole group, i.e., all nations.

What happens if people start buying more powerful guns? It’s quite obvious that people would look for newer and more powerful ones. It’s just endless.
That’s why it is called an “arms race.”

You have a point.
Nice expression.

I became aware of it already when I was in elementary school!!
I understood that when I was in elementary school!!!

there was one that always made me to hesitate to sign on.
there was one thing I had to sign that always made me hesitate.

Yes. What I wanted to say was it, and I didn’t talk about you. If you thought so, I’m sorry.
Yes. That was what I wanted to say, and I wasn’t talking about you. I’m sorry if it came across that way.

Even if you really talked about me, I would not be angry with you at all!
Even if you had been talking about me, I would not have been angry with you at all! (A-Z: if / when)

Anyway, I’m against Japan developing its own nuclear weapons.
Nice sentence.

Sorry, “haven’t had enough fighting and competing” should be correct.
If it’s during a specified period in the past like “during their childhoods,” it should be “didn’t have enough….”

Joking apart, as I wrote here before,…
“Joking apart” is a good expression to learn if you don’t know it.

He seems to have two faces.
“Two faces” generally has a negative connotation in English. It’s used to talk about people who say nice things to someone’s face, and then horrible things behind their back. In this case, “two sides to his personality” would be more appropriate.

How do you think about their ideas?
What do you think about their ideas? (A-Z: how)

Actually I don’t thnk women are generally any less competitive than men…
A friend of mine once said to me, “If you leave two or more boys alone for more than a minute, they will develop some kind of game that involves competing.” I laughed, but every time I have observed that kind of situation since, it has turned out to be true!

it’s impossible to eliminate nuclear weapons in the world.
it’s impossible to eliminate nuclear weapons from the world.

The reason why I say so is that boy babies look usually more aggressive and rough than girl babies to me.
I know a number of women who have had one or two daughters, and then a son. Most of them end up shell-shocked! My brother’s wife said she couldn’t believe the difference between their older daughter and their younger son, and my friend Aoki san’s wife said the same. She always said that she wanted to have a really big family when she only had two daughters. After she had her son, she suddenly changed her mind!

-> How much more powerful Japan could be than now it is in the world if they possessed nuclear weapons.
How much more powerful Japan could be in the world than it is now if it possessed nuclear weapons.

That’s all for today. Have a great weekend, and I will be back on Monday with a very controversial topic. I’m expecting to hear some strong opinions and arguments, but I’ll try to stay out of it because I have extremely strong feelings on the subject, and I’m guessing that no one here (apart from maybe Kattie) will agree with me!

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Comments

  1. YU
    Commented on
    2013/02/22 at 7:29

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your correction!

    > Maybe “Knowing that I can’t see it makes me want to see it even more!”

    Answer is always very simple, after all!

    >Even if you really talked about me, I would not be angry with you at all!
    - Even if you had been talking about me, I would not have been angry with you at all! (A-Z: if / when)

    I made several errors in tense, but I used “Even if” as you corrected. Why should I read the part of (A-Z: if / when)??

    > It’s used to talk about people who say nice things to someone’s face, and then horrible things behind their back.

    I see, I don’t think my son is that bad yet!
    I hope!!

    > Most of them end up shell-shocked!

    Every time when I ask pregnant friends “Boy or girl? and if their answer is “boy”, they make a long face and answer me “Boy…”.

    I’m going to attend a 新年会 tomorrow. I’m looking forward to it!

    Have a nice weekend, all!

  2. David Barker
    Commented on
    2013/02/22 at 9:31

    Hi YU,

    That part of the book explains the different uses of tense in “if” sentences. If you already know it, you don’t need to read it.

  3. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/02/22 at 9:46

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback and answering my question. As you said, the natural expression is always very simple! (Thanks YU, for always thinking together.)

    By the way, “basket-case” and “shell-shocked” was new to me. I’ve also found the word “bread basket” in my dictionary.

    >If it’s during a specified period in the past like “during their childhoods,” it should be “didn’t have enough….”

    Ah~!! I’ve been reading that part in your book over and over, and I still can’t use it correctly! I’m sure I can next time! (I hope!)

  4. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/02/22 at 9:47

    Sorry, “as you said” should be “as YU said”!

  5. Fumie
    Commented on
    2013/02/23 at 5:49

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback. It is a difficult topic. I really hope no country develop nuclear weapons and there is world peace forever: although that seems impossible.

    >Most of them end up shell-shocked!
    Ha ha ha, I wasn’t shell-shocked but I just a bit shocked when I knew I gave birth to my second/third sons. But I think that boys are not so terrible when they get older.

    >~I will be back on Monday with a very controversial topic.
    I wonder what is such a controversial topic.

    Have a great weekend, everyone!

  6. YU
    Commented on
    2013/02/23 at 8:38

    Hi David,

    >That part of the book explains the different uses of tense in “if” sentences. If you already know it, you don’t need to read it.

    I see. 
    Thank you.

    Hi Fumie,

    > but I just a bit shocked when I knew I gave birth to my second/third sons. But I think that boys are not so terrible when they get older.

    A friend of mine has three boy children(4, 2, 0), too. Every time she gave birth she got slimmer and slimmer!!
    I remember you told us that you’ve lost weight through raising your three sons when we disucussed “Unworn clothes”!

  7. amo
    Commented on
    2013/02/23 at 7:45

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback and I am looking forward to new topic on Monday.

    Hi everyone,

    How’s your weekend?
    Hope you are having fun.

    amo

  8. Fumie
    Commented on
    2013/02/23 at 10:20

    Hi YU,

    >I remember you told us that you’ve lost weight through raising your three sons when we disucussed “Unworn clothes”!
    Yes, that’s right. The reason I lost weight might that they had/have voracious appetite and there weren’t much food left when my meal time. You may imagine that I’m a slim woman but I’m average weight now. It’s just that I used to be fat before I gave birth my children. So I have to thank them not leaving me much food! Ha ha ha.

  9. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/02/24 at 8:32

    Hi Fumie and everyone,

    I know boys that are already 17 and 15, but still compete with each other all the time! Actually, I had to yell at them this morning not to play soccer “in” the house! This is not a gym!
    The boys who come to learn English are much better than my sons because they won’t actually run around, but can you imagine what they do before class begins? While girls start talking or exchange fancy stickers with each other, boys “flop” their erasers and compete! (ha-ha!)
    However, I think boys are generally kind to others. I will never forget my sons putting a cold towel on my forehead when I was in bed with a fever. Well, the problem was that it wasn’t a clean towel. It was a wet duster from the kitchen!(台ふきん!)

    By the way, I read an article in the newspaper which said Japan offered technical cooperation for the recent air polution in China. They said they’re going to find the main cause of the problem and also create more effective filters together. I really admire these experts. It’s really nice if this cooperation would help the two nations build a better relationship with each other, isn’t it?

  10. Fumie
    Commented on
    2013/02/24 at 10:04

    Hi Biwa,

    >Actually, I had to yell at them this morning not to play soccer “in” the house!
    Ha ha ha, boys never grow up! They are like David in “No, David!”. He(David) played baseball in the house and broke the vase in the story.

    >It was a wet duster from the kitchen!(台ふきん!)
    They are so sweet although their act was a little clumsy. As you said, boys generally have tender hearts. My sons always try to help me when I don’t feel well or I’m in trouble. My eldest son made terrible cake for family in return for the cake which I made for Valentine’s Day. Biwa の息子さんもうちの子もうまくはできないけれど、人のためを思ってやってくれる気持ちがうれしいですよね!

    >It’s really nice if this cooperation would help the two nations build a better relationship with each other, isn’t it?
    Yes, I really hope so too!

  11. Kattie
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 4:24

    Hi everyone

    I think that little girls are often very competitive but it might not be so obvious to a casual observer because it’s often quite political and to do with being the most popular, having the most prized toy etc and not necessarily to do with winning a race – although that can be very nice too! I think viewing competitivenss as a peculiarly male trait can stop little girls wanting to do too well – which is a real shame. I think this is why girls in single sex schools often perform better – they can be competitive without feeling unfeminine.

    I don’t like stereotyping boys and girls too much because there are too many people that don’t ‘fit’ into the stereotypes and it can be very damaging. I remember my eldest daughter was absolutely fascinated by dinosaurs and from the age of 3, she learnt all the dinosaurs’ names, what they ate etc and by the age of 5/6 she said she wanted to be a paleontologist. Every night at bedtime she had to have this factual book about dinosaurs read and if I tried to skip bits, she knew! Anyway, when she went to school, the teacher said they were about to do a topic that would probably only really appeal to the boys. She asked the class a few questions about dinosaurs and Emily kept putting her hand up but the teacher kept ignoring her and asking the boys. I don’t think the teacher was trying to be mean, she just didn’t see her because her mind was closed to the idea that a girl could be interested in this. When Emily came home she was really upset, she said she knew much more about dinosaurs than all the boys and the teacher. Soon afterwards she became too embarrassed to talk about dinosaurs openly because it was supposedly ‘too boyish’!

    Emily has just had her 22nd birthday- and for her birthday treat she told me she was going to the Natural History Museum in London to look at the dinosaurs with her boyfriend! I’m glad she got over this knock back but I think there are many other girls and boys who have veered away from things because they haven’t conformed to stereotypical gender roles – and, who knows, without this knock back, she might have become a paleontologist.

  12. Fumie
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 9:20

    Hi Kattie,

    >I don’t like stereotyping boys and girls too much because there are too many people that don’t ‘fit’ into the stereotypes and it can be very damaging.
    -I couldn’t agree with you more. It is absurd to categorize certain things are for boys or girls and like Emily’s case there are people who are good at things which don’t conform to stereotypical gender roles.
    It’s so nice that she still have interested in dinosaurs. I admire you that you accept her passion.

  13. YU
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 9:22

    Hi Kattie and everyone,

    > I think that little girls are often very competitive but it might not be so obvious to a casual observer because it’s often quite political and to do with being the most popular, having the most prized toy etc and not necessarily to do with winning a race

    I agree with you.
    As Biwa mentioned, in Japan, it is very polurar with little girls to collect fancy stickers and compare their “sticker collection albums” with each other now. It is much more peaceful than boys’ ways, but as you say, it is surely a kind of competitions.

    > I don’t like stereotyping boys and girls too much because there are too many people that don’t ‘fit’ into the stereotypes and it can be very damaging. I remember my eldest daughter was absolutely fascinated by dinosaurs and from the age of 3,

    I don’t like that, either.
    My friend’s daughter used to like Thomas the Tank Engine very much from the age of 2 or 3, too. She always wore blue T-shirts.

    However, I don’t really think those things have much to do with “which gender is more competitive”, I’m afraid, I think that is just a matter of preference.

    I think, as you say, boys and girls are both competitive, but just their ways of cometing are very different, and most people find boys more aggressive and competitive than girls because they(boys’) are more obvious.

  14. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 10:10

    Hi Kattie and everyone,

    Thanks Kattie, for sharing Emily’s story. And Happy Birthday for Emily!
    Her story reminded me how disappointed I felt when my teacher told us that girls should not participate in two of the games-”cavalry battle” and “pulling the pole down”-in the annual sports festival. He just said that it was too dangerous and unsuitable for girls. My friends and I knew that we could do much better than some of the boys!
    Well, my case is much more trifling than Emily’s, but I guess everyone has similar experiences. My younger son was interested in playing the piano when he was little, but he hesitated to take lessons because his friends said it was a girl’s thing to do!(I wonder what Tom would say when he hears this!) Or, my elder son suddenly stopped wearing bright colors(red,pink) after entering school because his classmates said they were “girls’ colors”. What is difficult is that, for little children, what their friends say are much more politically important than what their parents say. It’s really funny because most parents know labelling children by gender does nothing but harm, but children(especially little children) tend to do it. I guess it’s mostly a process of growing up, but it’s really a shame if it actually discourages other’s interests.

  15. Kattie
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 5:50

    Hi Biwa and everyone,

    > What is difficult is that, for little children, what their friends say are more more politically important that what their parents say. It’s really funny because most parents know labelling children by gender does nothing but harm

    I agree children are very bothered by what their friends think but kids often get their ideas from their parents. I can’t tell you the number of times over the years that I have heard parents talking about things being ‘boyish’ or ‘girly’ and laughing when a child doesn’t conform in the way they think they should. I have heard parents say to their male children ‘You don’t want to play with that, that’s for little girls’ or visa versa. I think some parents are very embarrassed if their children deviate from the norm maybe they think it reflects on their own masculinity or femininity. I’m sure the end result is that we end up losing out on some people’s talents and it also leads to repression

  16. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 9:13

    Hi Kattie and everyone,

    >I’m sure the end result is that we end up losing out on some people’s talents and it also leads to repression

    I totally agree! If people keep sticking on to those stereotyped ways of thinking, I guess nothing new or unique would ever come out.
    I’m also quite surprised that situations don’t vary so much by country. I have always been thinking that the idea of gender equality was more widely or deeply spread in the UK. Or is it because the UK and Japan are both old and historic countries? I wonder how things go on in other Western countries.

  17. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 9:25

    I forgot to say that children and also adults have many sides, and it’s impossible to label them just by the words “feminine” or “masculine”. Humans are not that simple!

  18. Kattie
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 10:25

    Hi Biwa,

    >it’s impossible to label them just by the words “feminine” or “masculine”. Humans are not that simple!
    I completely agree!

    Actually things are much more equal in the UK than they were in the past. Emily and Rosie went to a very small village school which was very old fashioned and it’s also more than 15 years ago since the dinosaur incident happened so I hope things are different now.

    These days there are lots of women in jobs which were traditionally dominated by men for example, medicine, the law and politics and you also see men in jobs which have traditionally been dominated by women for example, nursing and primary school teaching.

    I’m not sure about what goes on in people’s homes. If you watched a lot TV adverts you would think that nothing had changed on the domestic front since the 1950s! However, advertising is usually very conservative. In our house, Tom does most, but not of all, the cooking and some of the washing, cleaning and tidying and I tend to do more of the ironing and cleaning, particularly emptying the bins and cleaning out the fire. I think most of our friends share the chores reasonably equally(unless one of them is out at work all the time and the other is at home) but I think you tend to choose friends with similar outlooks so they might not be completely representative.

  19. David
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 11:28

    Hi everyone,

    Sorry I didn’t get a chance to do a new entry today. I’m going to be really busy tomorrow as well, but I think I will be able to do a new entry tomorrow evening.

  20. YU
    Commented on
    2013/02/25 at 11:32

    Hi Kattie,

    >In our house, Tom does most, but not of all, the cooking and some of the washing, cleaning and tidying and I tend to do more of the ironing and cleaning, particularly emptying the bins and cleaning out the fire

    It reminds me of the story of a friend of mine from my English club. My friend is 52 and her husband is over 60.
    She said “I’ve been doing anything and everything around the house since we got married. My husband can’t even zap something in the microwave.”
    I asked her “Hasn’t your husband never lived by himself?”
    “Yes, he has, but then he always dined out.”, she answered.
    “How about washing? Can he use a washing maschine?”, I asked.
    She answered, “I don’t know. I’ve never seen him doing that. Before we got married he asked me to do everything around the house, or he didn’t need a wife.”
    Other friend of mine asked her, “Really? Don’t you feel bothered?”
    “Why do I? My husband works and supports me, so it is very natural for me to look after him. It’s better for women to get married early.”

    She is only 10 years older than me, but I felt as if I was talking with someone from the 19th century! However, she seems to be very satisfied with the situation, so it’s not my business, anyway!

    Having said that, I wonder how her husband would live alone if she passed away before him. They don’t have any children.

    As you say,

  21. Mika
    Commented on
    2013/02/26 at 12:11

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    Writing is not easy for me but I believe that writing is thinking and stay young.

    By the way, I just came back from Taiwan.
    I saw many young people who respect their elders and it made me think what I have to tell my children and grandchildren.

  22. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/02/26 at 11:49

    Hi Kattie, YU and everyone,

    I agree with Kattie saying that people tend to choose friends with similar outlooks. Actually, most of my friends and I do work, but not full time, and our husbands (as typical Japanese businessmen) work until late, so we all do most of the housework on weekdays. “Which does what(chore)” depends on every home and it’s fine as long as they both are feeling happy.
    Also, there’s no real end (and no weekends, either!) to housework, and if there is a difference between the two of the ideas of “how tidy it should be” or “what is the most prior”, it sure would be a big problem! From experience, there often is a great difference at the beginning because a wife and husband come from a completely different family.

    Anyway, as more and more women are working genderlessly, it’s really necessary to talk over things and share the chores. I also think children would never learn the idea of genderless unless they see their parents actually do those things.