Home > Blog > Whaling (Feedback)

March 1st, 2013 | Author: David

Whaling (Feedback)

Thank you all for your contributions to what was (as I thought it would be!) a very lively discussion. I think it is probably correct to say that Westerners are a bit hypocritical in their opposition to whaling, especially the ones who are quite happy to eat meat from animals that have been factory farmed.

Nevertheless, these right-wing Japanese politicians really frustrate me. Why do they not realise that behaving like a petulant child is a sign of weakness, not a sign of strength? The truth of the matter is that hardly anyone in Japan cares about eating whale meat, so the politicians are just doing it to show that “no one can tell us what to do.” If they were to say, “You know what, we realise that this upsets a lot of people, so we’ve decided to stop doing it,” it wouldn’t look weak at all – quite the opposite, in fact. And Japan’s standing in the international community would go up overnight. That would be real leadership.

Anyway, my goal this week was to make readers of the blog aware of how strongly Westerners tend to feel about this topic and how much damage Japan does to its international reputation by insisting on continuing to kill whales even though a lot of the meat never even gets eaten. I hope that I was at least able to achieve that aim, even if many of you don’t agree with my opinion. I will try to choose a lighter topic for next week!

Here is some feedback on your comments:

今週のエントリーの訳です。
Thank you.

I’m not in favor of killing whales for meat, but I’m not particularly against it, either.
Nice sentence.

fried whale meat was even one of the regular menu in school lunch.
fried whale meat was commonly served in school lunches. (“Menu” means the whole list of things that are served, so you cannot say “one of the menu.” A lot of people make this mistake, so I’m going to put it in my book when I update it.)

I am also against hunting as leisure.
We usually say “hunting for sport.”

To be honest, I don’t really understand why people from other countries get so emotional about whaling.
Nice sentence.

I think it’s really important for Japanese people to know what other people think.
Nice sentence.

Having said all this, I’m guessing that the two main reasons why people have strong anti-feelings towards Japan’s whaing is that we are the only country that catches whales in international waters(公海) and that some kinds of whales are endangered.
I think that is a good summary of the problem.

As I mentioned, eating whale meat wasn’t a so unusual thing when I was a child.
“… wasn’t so unusual” or “wasn’t such an unusual thing.” (A-Z: so/such a)

I hear royal families enjoy hunting foxes in the UK,
There is only one, so “I hear the royal family enjoy hunting foxes in the UK,…”

if all the animals expect whales and dolphins extincted from this world,
if all the animals except whales and dolphins became extinct, …

Why do we have to pay money for researching whales when many people still don’t have places to live?
Because the government has to pander to right-wing pressure groups, I think.

Yes, it must be at least more understandable if we killed whales in our own coastal water.
Yes, it would be more understandable if we killed whales in our own coastal waters.

Although it’s true that some are bred for food(養殖魚), but some aren’t same as whales or dolphins
Remember that you don’t need “but” if you begin with “although.”

Personally, I am finding it harder to justify eating meat and even dairy products.
Me too. I was actually a vegetarian for a couple of years when I was younger. It’s extremely difficult to be a vegetarian in Japan, though.

Do you mean that whaling is OK if the way of killing them is not cruel?
Do you mean that whaling would be okay if the method of killing them were not cruel?

It’s just like we’re trying to cover up the truth(actually, it’s not covered at all), and it is really unfair and dishonest.
That is pretty much how everyone except Japan views it.

I guess there is another nasty “amakudari” system in this issue, too.
As I have said before, “amakudari” is like a cancer at the heart of Japanese society. If you find anything dishonest, corrupt, or incompetent in Japan, there is usually some “amakudari” involved somewhere. I sincerely believe that Japan cannot be a great country again until this practice is stamped out. I’m ashamed to say that it even happens at my university.

It may be true that all kinds of whales are “not” being endangered and Japanese researchers don’t catch and kill such endangered whales.
It may be true that not all kinds of whales are endangered, and that Japanese researchers don’t catch or kill the ones that are.

By the way, what “the whale wasn’t going to leave any young” mean??
It means that you shouldn’t kill whales that have babies who are too young to fend for themselves. If someone dies, we often say, for example, “He leaves a wife and two children.”

I’m the one who should apologize!
Nice sentence.

However, in many case, most of researches seem unnecessary for many other people, so people should be more careful when they say such things, I think.
However, in many cases, a lot of research may seem unnecessary to people who don’t really understand it, so we should not be too quick to deem research unnecessary.

Because I think rights are artificial things, thoughts, or concepts,
That’s a very good point.

I know a majority rule is always right, but it makes much better decisions than an arbitrary rule.
I think it was Winston Churchill who said, “Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others.” He meant that all systems are bad, but democracy is the “least bad.”

so there might be something weird or off the track with my comment.
so this comment might seem weird or off-track.

however, I don’t get why Japan should stop hunting because of the feelings of other countries.
Nice use of “get” to mean “understand.” Do you all know the expression, “I don’t get it”?

Also, it is done for scientific research.
I don’t think anyone believes this. Even the minister didn’t claim that. He just talked about “tradition” and “culture.” By the way, whaling used to be a big part of American culture, too, but of course they don’t do it anymore.

If Japan stops whaling in this situation, many people would think Japan lose diplomatically and international influence of Japan may be going to weaken,
If Japan stopped whaling, many people would think we would lose face and our international influence would weaken. (As I said above, though, I think the exact opposite is true.)

Western people used to killing whales long time ago for its oil, they killed whales only for oil so they threw the rest.
Western people used to kill whales a long time ago for their oil. They just killed the whales, took the oil, and threw the rest of the animal away. (This is very true. Westerners also used to kill elephants, lions, and tigers just for sport! But like whaling, that has been outlawed by the international community now.)

We don’t talk in person on the blog, so it is sometimes more difficult to express what you really want to say. That’s why many members sometimes add Japanese sentence besides English ones.
That’s true. Please feel free to add Japanese if you are not sure whether your English is correct.

That’s all for today. Have a great weekend, and I’ll be back on Monday with a new topic.

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Comments

  1. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/01 at 8:03

    Sorry, last entry has been closed!!

    Hi Tomoaki, Kattie, Biwa and Anne,

    I read the conversations between Kattie and Tomoaki carefully once again and I realized that Tomoaki might have mistranslated the word of “absolutely”.

    Kattie wrote ;

    “I’m not absolutely sure what you mean here”

    This means of course, “I’m not 100% sure what you mean here” but Tomoaki thought like, “I’m not sure what you mean here at all” because the word “absolutely” has several kinds of usages.

    Tomoaki, did I get you? Or…??

    もう一度KattieとTomoakiのやり取りを注意深く読んでTomoakiがKattieの文の中の”absolutely”の意味を取り違えただけなのかな?という気がしました。

    Kattieはもちろんabsolutelyを使って「100%確信はないんだけど、もしかしてこういう意味?」と丁寧に聞いたつもりだったけどTomoakiはこのabsolutelyを完全否定のabsolutely「全くわからない」と訳してしまったのではないかな~と思いました。

    Tomoaki, もしかしたらそういうことだったのでしょうか?もし間違ってったらごめんなさいね。

  2. Tako
    Commented on
    2013/03/01 at 8:06

    私たちは、「肉を食べる為に鯨を”殺す”」などとは決して表現しません、ここが語学に関するサイトならもう少し適切な英語表現は出来ないものでしょうか、私は英語表現の微妙な部分は理解できませんが、筆者の先入観が随所に感じられます。

    その表現でお鮨を紹介すると、「日本人は魚を殺して、皮を剥ぎ取り身を切り刻んで、血のついた生のまま御飯の上にのせ食べます」となりあたかも蛮行を表現したようになります、この感覚はつい最近まで日本紹介の記事にあった表現です、でも今では鮨は世界の人が楽しむ日本発の食文化です。

    鯨食は、我が国では貴重な蛋白源としていました、今では多くの世界の国々と漁業の協議により、取り決めの範囲内でささやかに続けているのが現状だと思います、今日本では食用鯨は一般的ではありません、なかなか手に入れることは出来ません、でも鯨食も豊かで広範な食材の一つで我が国食文化です、私たちは恥ずることも、誇ることもありません。

    どなたか英語にしてください。

  3. Tomoaki
    Commented on
    2013/03/01 at 8:53

    Hi YU

    >Tomoaki, もしかしたらそういうことだったのでしょうか?

    まったく、そのとおりですね。こういう場合、そういう意味になるんですね、はじめて知りました。

    みなさんが丁寧な表現っていうので、?となっていたのですが、ようやく理解できました。ありがとうございます。Kattieには申し訳ないことをしてしまいました。

    デイビッドのヤサイと違って、人に不快な思いをさせる間違いはなくさないといけないですね。

    (とにかく、これ以上の誤解は避けたいので日本語でコメントさせてもらいました。)

  4. Anne
    Commented on
    2013/03/01 at 10:03

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback. This week’s topic was interesting to discuss but was difficult!
    Looking forward to the lighter topic for the next week:)

    Hi Tomoaki and YU,

    >もう一度KattieとTomoakiのやり取りを注意深く読んでTomoakiがKattieの文の中の”absolutely”の意味を取り違えただけなのかな?という気がしました
    —Actually, I thought that way,too. That’s why I shared my idea about discussion, but I should have been kinder and have explained the point more clearly. The use of “absolutely” here is the one I’m not familiar with and want to learn.

    実をいうと、私もそのようにコメントを読んで感じました。なので、ごちゃごちゃと「丁寧な言い方ですよ」とオブラートに包んだ言いかたしました。でも、もっとはっきり言った方が親切でしたね。 それに、このabsolutelyの使い方、覚えたいなと思ったのです。以上。

    Have a lovely weekend,everyone!

    Anne

  5. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/01 at 10:58

    Hi Tomoaki,

    So, you just took Kattie’s sentence wrong.
    じゃあやっぱり勘違いしていただけだったんですね。

    As Anne and David said, you’d better add Japanese if you are not sure whether your English is correct. However, this way doesn’t work for Kattie because she doesn’t speak Japanese.
    AnneやDavidが言うように、全部じゃなくても自信がない文には日本語を併記すると誤解がなくなっていいと思います。でもこのやり方はKattieに対しては効果が望めませんけどね。Kattieは日本語を話さないので。

    Addition to that, you’d better ask the person first if you are not sure whether your understanding is correct.
    更に、相手の言わんとするところがイマイチ分からないときはまず相手に意味を確かめた方が無難だと思いますよ。

    Actually, I always enjoy reading your comments because they are always very logical unlike mine!!
    I wonder if you are a science student…
    実はTomoakiのコメントいつも楽しんで読んでいます。私のと違っていつも論理的な組立てなので。理系の学生さんなのかな?

    Hi Anne,

    Excuse my interference! I didn’t know you meant that. I’m too dull!

  6. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/02 at 12:08

    Hi David,

    Thank you always for your correction!
    This topic(incl. animal testing) is indeed very controversial, but for me, it was one of the best topics since I’ve ever discussed here.

    >“Menu” means the whole list of things that are served, so you cannot say “one of the menu.”

    I aways thought that “menu”(メニュー) and “dish”(料理) were almost same as it is so in Japanese language. Thank you.

    > There is only one, so “I hear the royal family enjoy hunting foxes in the UK,…”

    I see. Do you say “the royal family members”, too?

    I read in somewhere that “family” becomes both single and plural, for example,
    “My family is big.”(私の家族は大家族です)
    “My family are all fine.”(私の家族はみんな元気です)

    Or if you say “the royal family ‘ENJOY’, not ‘enjoys’, it already means “the royal family MEMBERS”?

    > By the way, what “the whale wasn’t going to leave any young” mean??
    It means that you shouldn’t kill whales that have babies who are too young to fend for themselves. If someone dies, we often say, for example, “He leaves a wife and two children.”

    Thank you for your explanation. I got it now.

    Have a nice weekend, all!

    See you!

  7. Kattie
    Commented on
    2013/03/02 at 12:50

    Hi Tomoaki, Yu, Anne and everyone else!

    >I read the conversations between Kattie and Tomoaki carefully once again and I realized that Tomoaki might have mistranslated the word of “absolutely”.

    Thanks Yu, you are very clever to spot this! I thought something might have been lost in translation! As Anne said, it can be very difficult when you are writing to say exactly what you want – this is even true for native speakers.

    My day job is in recruitment and I often receive texts and emails which don’t have the right tone -sometimes people can come across as a bit rude when I’m sure they really don’t mean to be. I also sometimes find it difficult myself when I’m writing to future (non native) guests because I want to sound friendly and welcoming but I also need to convey all the information If I was writing to someone who had very good English, or a native English speaker, I might phrase things differently to show I was being friendly but this can make the English harder to understand. I’m sure you all have the same problems when you deal with non native Japanese speakers. I suppose it also goes to show how important non verbal communication is too. Tomoaki, I hope I haven’t put you off writing on the blog – your comments are very interesting.

    Hi Biwa,

    > I can’t help thinking that if any of the members here were the spokesperson, people in other countries would not be that emotional.

    I think you should go into politics, you are very emotionally intelligent (do you know this phrase?)

    Thank you for explaining ‘sessho’ it’s very interesting. It’s a shame there aren’t a lot more forums like this, where people from different countries can discuss these issues and by-pass the official channels – if there were, I’m sure it would help international understanding

    Hi Fumie,

    Thanks for your friendly comments!

    Hi David,

    Do you seek out detergents etc which are not tested on animals? I don’t know whether the leaping rabbit symbol, which shows they haven’t been tested on animals, is just a UK/EU thing

  8. Fumie
    Commented on
    2013/03/02 at 6:08

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback!
    >Anyway, my goal this week was to make readers of the blog aware of how strongly Westerners tend to feel about this topic and how much damage Japan does to its international reputation by insisting on continuing to kill whales even though a lot of the meat never even gets eaten.
    I can see that. A few days ago, 3 of top 5 topics of Japan Today were about this topic. It showed how strongly Westerners feel about this topic!

    I learned new word/expressions from your entry.
    fend for oneself, stamp out and pander.

    Hi Kattie,

    >I suppose it also goes to show how important non verbal communication is too.
    I just learned that about 90 % of communication are conveys by non verbal communication. It shows how difficult to convey one’s ideas not meeting people in person.

    Have a lovely weekend, everyone!

  9. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/02 at 11:20

    Hi Kattie,

    > My day job is in recruitment and I often receive texts and emails which don’t have the right tone -sometimes people can come across as a bit rude when I’m sure they really don’t mean to be

    I know what you mean. I had to exchange emails with my clients from other countries at my last job every day. Some were native speakers and some were non native speakers like me. I often received emails from non native speaker clients which didn’t have the right tone, but I’m pretty sure that my emails must have upset them, too!!

    >I’m sure you all have the same problems when you deal with non native Japanese speakers.

    This is not about written communication, though… As you know, my husband is a foreigner. He speaks pretty good Japanese, but it isn’t as good as David’s, so his words still sometimes upset me. However, I know he doesn’t really mean to be and as Fumie mentioned, I often feel his voice tone or face expression give me more information than what he actually talks.

    See you!

  10. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/03/02 at 11:44

    Hi David,

    Thank you always for your feedback and I really enjoyed discussing this topic. I also find it very interesting that the diffficulty and frustration to read or write in English forces me to think what I really want to write!

    By the way, Churchill’s words are a bit difficult for me to get. “Worst”=”most bad”. But why “worst”=”least bad”? Maybe I need more Brain Training(脳トレ) :(

    Hi YU,

    You’re a real careful reader! I couldn’t spot that.
    For the word “menu”, I think the Japanese usages like “today’s reccomened menu(本日のお薦めメニュー)” are causing the misunderstanding. I think “a la carte” is used in a wrong way, too. I know it’s not English, though.

    Hi Kattie,

    >I think you should go into politics, you are very emotionally intelligent (do you know this phrase?)

    Thank you for saying that, I wish I really were! Actually, I didn’t know the phrase, and I had to look into some on-line dictionaries. Is it something like the ability or capacity to understand your own and other people’s emotions? I’m not really sure if we have the exact word/concept in Japanese.(Does anyone know?) Maybe we include it altogether in the word “personality”. Anyway, as I wrote to David, it’s just that the language forces me to think carefully. As I’ve never seen any happy-looking politicians, politics would be my last choice!

  11. Mika
    Commented on
    2013/03/02 at 6:35

    Hi Biwa,

    I checked the phrase.
    emotionally intelligent
    人間関係を維持する[相手の感情を理解する]能力が高い[発達している]
    心の知能[感情的知性]が高い[発達している]

  12. Anne
    Commented on
    2013/03/02 at 11:11

    Hi YU,
    >Excuse my interference! —Oh, please don’t say that. I was not meaning to say. As kattie mentioned, you are kind and clever:)

    Hi Kattie and everyone,
    >I’m sure you all have the same problems when you deal with non native Japanese speakers.

    —-I help non native Japanese speakers with learning Japanese as a volunteer at the moment. I tried to teach polite expressions. It could be rude but he/she doesn’t realize.

    Anne

  13. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 7:58

    Hi Mika,

    Thank you for looking up the meaning.
    I think my understanding is correct, but I haven’t had the idea of sorting the kinds of intelligence in daily conversation. It sounds like a term of psychology origin. Anyway, I’ve learned a nice word.(Thanks, Kattie!)

  14. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 8:07

    Sorry, “I didn’t have the idea of sorting…” should be correct for this case.

  15. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 8:30

    Hi Anne,

    > Oh, please don’t say that. I was not meaning to say.

    I’m relieved to hear that. :-)
    Actually, I should have read YOUR comment (to Tomoaki) once more carefully, too!
    実は”Anneの”Tomoakiへのコメントももっと注意深く読んでいればAnneの意図していることがわかっていたかも、と思いました。

    Hi Mika,

    > emotionally intelligent
    人間関係を維持する[相手の感情を理解する]能力が高い[発達している]
    心の知能[感情的知性]が高い[発達している]

    I think this fits Biwa’s characteristic perfectly.
    I always feel she is a very social person, so I guess she learned to be “emotionally intelligent” naturally.

    Hi Biwa,

    > For the word “menu”, I think the Japanese usages like “today’s reccomened menu(本日のお薦めメニュー)” are causing the misunderstanding.

    I think so, too.
    Don’t you think “ごはん” and “お風呂” in Japanese language are confusing, too?
    “ごはん” means both “meal in general” and “rice”.
    “お風呂に入る” usually means “taking a bath”, but if you are asked “お風呂入った?”, you may say “Yes” even if you actually only took a shower.
    To tell the truth, my husband and I sometimes have a quarrel over this お風呂 issue!!
    For him “taking a bath” and “taking a shower” seem to be completely different two things because it is so in his language…

    > I think “a la carte” is used in a wrong way, too. I know it’s not English, though.

    My dictionary says ;

    a la carte adj. adv.(from French)

    if food in a restaurant is a la carte, of if you eat a la carte, you choose from a list of dishes that have separate prices, rather than having a complete meal at a fixed price

    So, you mean, most people believe “a la carte” is a noun and means “一品料理”?

    By the way, I’m going to give a two hour lesson at my English club this week again. I chose one of the Carpenters’ songs, “Only Yesterday” for our song dictation practice!

  16. David Barker
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 3:25

    Hi Tako,

    Thanks for your comment, but I’m not really sure what you mean by this part:

    >私たちは、「肉を食べる為に鯨を”殺す”」などとは決して表現しません、ここが語学に関するサイトならもう少し適切な英語表現は出来ないものでしょうか、

    Which English expression are you referring to? I would translate that as “killing whales for meat” or “killing whales in order to eat them.” I would also say “killing cows for meat” or “killing pigs for meat,” so I don’t think there is anything strange about that expression.

    日本人は鯨を食べるために殺しているのは事実で、誰も否定していないと思います。大臣でも「鯨を食べるのは我々の文化」のように言っていました。

    >筆者の先入観が随所に感じられます。
    それはおっしゃる通りです!認めざるを得ません。As I said in the entry, I have strong feelings on this topic. That doesn’t mean I expect everyone to agree with me, though.

    > でも鯨食も豊かで広範な食材の一つで我が国食文化です、私たちは恥ずることも、誇ることもありません。
    And of course, you are completely entitled to your opinion, too. As I said, the main purpose of my entry was to make readers of this blog aware of how strongly people in other countries feel about this topic. If you know that and still feel that Japan is doing nothing wrong, that’s fine.

    Anyway, thanks for your comment, and hope to hear from you again.

    Hi YU,

    I find the word 天気 very confusing. I didn’t realise until quite recently that it can mean both “weather” and “good weather.”

  17. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 5:53

    Hi YU,

    I know exactly what you mean about “ごはん”!It’s funny because we can tell which quite automatically by the context. But if I was asked “お風呂入った?”, I would answer “ううん、シャワーで済ませたよ”, so maybe my way of using the word is closer to your husband!

    As you said, I think “a la carte” is a kind of way to eat as “We ate a la carte”. However, I see many restaurants hanging signs like “Today’s a la carte menu”. I wonder if this makes sense.
    I also see many expressions like “English expressions a la carte(英語表現アラカルト)” or “kitchen storage a la carte(キッチン収納アラカルト)”. They probably mean “various examples”, but I guess it’s Japanese-French.

    Your lessons always sound really interesting. I love that song, too! “Tomorrow maybe even brighter than toda~y, since I threw my sa~dness away, only yesterday♪♪♪” I wish I could sing like Karen! ha-ha!

  18. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 7:14

    Hi Tako,

    Is this your first comment?
    If so, nice to have you with us! :-)

    > 私たちは、「肉を食べる為に鯨を”殺す”」などとは決して表現しません、ここが語学に関するサイトならもう少し適切な英語表現は出来ないものでしょうか、

    As soon as I read your sentence above, I checked my Japanese translation because I was not very sure if “I” was the one who translated “killing whales for meat” as「肉を食べるために鯨を”殺す”」.
    But it seems that I translated it as just「鯨を殺す」maybe because as you say, it was a bit difficult to translate it into Japanese.

    Takoのコメントを読んで直ちに「肉を食べるために鯨を”殺す”」と書いた張本人は私だったかも、と思って自分の和訳を確認しました。どうやら私は「鯨を殺す」としか訳してなかったみたいですが、多分私もその時訳しにくいと感じたからそういう訳にしたのだと思います。

    However, I realized that David used another expression, “killing whales/pigs/chickens, etc.. for FOOD” several times in our discussion and I somehow felt that it might be almost the same meaning as “killing animals for MEAT”.
    So, I guess you can translate “killing pigs/ cows/whales for meat” as「豚/牛/鯨の肉を(人間の)食用にする」. I might be wrong, though… If this translation was correct, I don’t think there is anything strange about the expression.

    でもディスカッションを進めるうち、Davidが”killing whales for FOOD”というまた別の表現を何度か使っているのに気づきました。そして話の流れからその表現は”killing whales for MEAT”とほぼ同じ意味なのでは?という気がしました。だから間違っているかもしれませんがもしかして”killing animals for meat”は単に「~(動物)の肉を食用にする」と訳せるのではないかと思いました。もし本当にそう訳せるとすれば”killing whales for meat”は少しも不適切な表現ではないと思います。

    > 私は英語表現の微妙な部分は理解できませんが、筆者の先入観が随所に感じられます。

    I don’t understand the fine nuances in English language, either, but as I mentioned above, I have a feeling that “killing” and “for meat” in the expression of “killing whales for meat” has a negative meaning in particular.

    私も英語表現の微妙なニュアンスは全くわかりませんが、”killing whales for meat”という表現の中の”killing”と”for meat”は特段敵意のあるものではないのでは、という気がしますが、どうでしょう?

    Hi David,

    Indeed, 天気 is very confusing, too!
    “天気” has two meanings ; “weather” and “beautiful weather”.

  19. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 9:35

    Hi Biwa,

    > But if I was asked “お風呂入った?”, I would answer “ううん、シャワーで済ませたよ”, so maybe my way of using the word is closer to your husband!

    So, maybe I’m the outsider in Japan! LOL!!
    When my husband comes home from work, he often asks me if my son and I already took a bath. I usually answer “うん” even when we only had a shower. Then he goes to the bathroom to press 追い焚き button and finds there’s no water in the bathtub! That’s how we start a quarrel. Maybe I’m too lazy to answer “うん、でもシャワーで済ませたよ”.

    As for “a la carte”, to be honest, I didn’t know it is actually pronounced “アラカルト” in Japanese language until I looked up the meaning in the dictionary this time. I always pronounced it “アラカルテ”, but no one corrected me until today!

  20. ashmoleanmuse
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 10:38

    David,

    Japan is not the only country that is whaling. Faroe Islands(Denmark), Iceland, Norway, Canada, Greenland…

    Check the first footage. Danish people in Faroe Islands enjoy watching whales dying?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWWxzEZ556s

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4U-IRDuWC0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1Rr6KcxT-M

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrH0S68-luc

  21. David Barker
    Commented on
    2013/03/03 at 11:15

    Hi ashmoleanmuse,

    I know that Japan is not the only country that is whaling, so I wonder why it attracts such a strong protest? I honestly don’t know. I’m going to google it now and find out.

  22. amo
    Commented on
    2013/03/04 at 8:37

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback. It was an interesting topic to discuss as others said though, I am glad that you are going to give us a light topic this week.

    Hi everyone,

    How’s your weekend? I went to the movies with friends, and had a drink after that.

    Have a nice day:)
    amo

    P. S. David,
    When I wrote a comment, other member’s name had remained. So it seems that the problem has not been solved.

  23. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/03/04 at 8:47

    Hi Tako,

    I found your comment(which was actually written on March 1st) suddenly published yesterday evening. I wonder what was happening.

    Anyway, for the exprssion “killing whales/cows/pigs for meat”, I understand that we never or at least avoid to say “kill(殺す、屠殺する)” when people are trying to eat, and I don’t think English-speaking people would say so, either.

    However, for this whaling issue, the truth is that we are actually “killing” whales because everyone knows it’s impossible to “catch” such huge whales alive and keep them in a tank and bring it all the way back to Japan. Even if it’s possible, we’re going to kill it anyway to eat it.

    I also think that the expression “捕鯨(catching whales)” blindfolds people’s(especially Japanese) awareness of how strongly how other peple feel about this problem.
    I hope to hear from you again soon!

    Hi ashmoleanmuse,

    I’m waiting for your next comment. Are you saying that Japan is not the only country that should be blamed? I hope you could give us more explanation for your comment.

    Hi amo,

    Glad you had a nice weekend. What movie did you see?

  24. David Barker
    Commented on
    2013/03/04 at 1:46

    Hi amo,

    I’m really sorry about that. We thought that we had fixed the problem, but obviously we haven’t. I have already asked the tech guy to look at it again.

    Hi Biwa and Tako,

    Sorry for the delay in publishing Tako’s comment. Because it was the first comment, it had to be approved by me. I saw it on Saturday and approved it on my phone, but then I realized on Sunday that I had done something wrong, so I had to do it again on my computer.

  25. YU
    Commented on
    2013/03/04 at 1:58

    Hi Biwa,

    > However, for this whaling issue, the truth is that we are actually “killing” whales because everyone knows it’s impossible to “catch” such huge whales alive and keep them in a tank and bring it all the way back to Japan. Even if it’s possible, we’re going to kill it anyway to eat it.

    I’m not absolutely sure what you mean here, but do you mean that using the word “killing” is suitable for whaling because it’s impossible to catch whales alive and bring them back to Japan as they are simply too big?
    If you meant so, I don’t really think it is a matter of the size of animals because English speaking people use the expression “kill…for meat” for other animals such as pigs, cows, chickens, too. They are surely much smaller than whales, but we are “killing” them, too.

    But I guess you actually meant something else…