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November 29th, 2013 | Author: David

Guns (Feedback)

Thanks for all your comments. As I expected, most of you do not have any experience with guns at all, and I think that is a very good thing.

Like Japanese people, British people find it very hard to understand American attitudes to guns, but for some people, the right to own a gun is almost like a religion.

The pro-gun lobby group in the US is called the National Rifle Association, and they are very powerful. Before he died in 2008, the actor Charlton Heston used to be one of the main spokespeople for the group.

After the massacre at Columbine High School, the director Michael Moore made a movie called Bowling for Columbine. He visited Heston’s house and interviewed him. Here is a video of it. This caused quite a stir in America at the time. If you watch it, you will see why.

Here is some feedback on your comments.

I thought you’ve told us you lived in the US when you were very small.
I think you told us that…

I wonder what are the requirements for getting a license to have a gun in Japan.
I wonder what the requirements are for …

there are a lot of American soldiers there.
This is a nice example of the use of two different “there”s in one sentence.

Why his father didn’t tell him that a real gun?
Why didn’t his father tell him that it was a real gun?

If he had owned it legally, he wouldn’t have arrested on suspicion of weapons violation.
If he had owned it legally, he wouldn’t have been arrested on …

If I found a gun in the teacher’s room or my house, I would presume it’s fake.
… I would presume it was a fake.

Moreover, how can you tell they’re real bullets?
Nice sentence.

I was only 5 to 8 when I lived in San Francisco, so I don’t think they would have told me even if they did.
Nice sentence.

Sorry, maybe the word “irrelevant” is not appropriate. Should I say “unrelated” instead?
The best word would actually be “foreign.” Guns are something so foreign to me …

I used a fake in the play I acted
I once used an imitation gun in a play I acted in. (“Fake” is not wrong, but I wanted to introduce another common word.)

This article reminds me of a story of 服部くん.
I remember that. It was a terrible story. Unfortunately, some American police officers are a bit trigger-happy.

It’s really sad and tragic for both of the families.
Nice sentence.

The former PM, Taro Aso, was once a representative in the Olympics in clay shooting.
Not wrong, but we would usually say, “… once represented Japan in the Olympics at clay shooting.”

His parents have been working hard appealing the strict gun control in the U.S after his death.
His parents have been fighting hard for stricter gun control in the U.S. since his death.

but he’s never told me that he had a gun at home there.
but he’s never mentioned having had a gun at home while he was there.

How tragic it is!
That would be really tragic! (We don’t really use “How (adj) it is” in modern English.

I’m sure situations must have changed a lot.
I’m sure things must have changed a lot.

By the way, if any of you are following “bitsofenglish” on Twitter, I am going to start tweeting all the nice sentences I see on your comments as soon as I see them. If you don’t want me to use your comments like that, please just let me know.

Have a great weekend.

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Comments

  1. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/11/30 at 10:34

    Hi David,

    Thank you for the feedback. It’s always really really helpful. :)
    No problem with my sentences being tweeted!

    Today, I’m going to meet two old friends from elementary school. It’s too scary to think how long we’ve been hanging around together! Anyway, one of them has spent his high school days in Alaska, so I’m going to ask him his impressions on guns. I’m a real earnest student, aren’t I!

    Have a nice weekend, everyone!

  2. Fumie
    Commented on
    2013/11/30 at 9:43

    Hi David,

    Thank you so much for your feedback.
    The topic of guns is thought-provoking and it was a good chance to think about this problem.

    How tragic it is! (my original sentence.)
    >That would be really tragic! (We don’t really use “How (adj) it is” in modern English.
    I know it’s the second time you corrected this structured sentence. I should have been more careful!
    From tomorrow the last month of the year will start. It’s going to be busy to get ready for New Year.

  3. amo
    Commented on
    2013/11/30 at 9:58

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback :)
    I forgot to mention this but one of my sisters used to do sport shooting. (I want to say ”スポーツ射撃をしてた” in English) I am not sure whether she still does shooting, but when Tokyo was chosen to host 2020 Olympics, I told her that I was looking forward to seeing her shooting on Tokyo Olympics(lol)

    Hi Biwa,

    How was the reunion with your old friends? Hope you had a great time with your friends.
    About your questions, they are 15(boy), 11(girl) and 3(girl). At least, her son knows where it is kept.

    Good night
    amo

  4. Anne
    Commented on
    2013/12/01 at 8:10

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback. It’s always helpful!

    > but we would usually say, “… once represented Japan in the Olympics at clay shooting.”
    —I see. When I saw the corrected version, I thought of the Japanese sentence(or word) that came to mind when I wrote this. I meant to say, “彼はかって日本のクレー射撃の代表だった。” For me, ”代表” meant “representative.” I wonder if it was OK when I wrote “He was once ‘Japan’s representative’ or not. I don’t think I fully understood the differences in nuance. Maybe I need some more time to get it.

    Hi Biwa, I hope you had a great time with your friends.

    Have a lovely Sunday,everyone^^)

  5. Kattie
    Commented on
    2013/12/01 at 9:43

    Hi everyone,

    As David said, thankfully guns are quite alien to most people in the UK. I only know one person who has a gun, he uses it for shooting pheasants (birds) and although he is a good friend of mine, and was a neighbour for many years, I never actually saw it because he had to keep it in a locked safe when he wasn’t using it. The first time I remember seeing a gun (which wasn’t for hunting) was when I was a child and we went on holiday to Italy, our car broke down at the French/Italian border and the Italian police gave us a lift, I remember being very shocked because their guns were just lying casually on the back shelf of the car.

    I think Americans believe that the right to bear arms is a constitutional right which is why so many of them are loathe to give it up.

    Hi Biwa,

    I hope your reunion went well, please tell us all about it.

    Hi Yu,

    If you get up at about just after 4am, what time do you go to bed? I’m intrigued!

  6. Kattie
    Commented on
    2013/12/01 at 9:46

    Correction:
    Sorry I was going to say ‘about 4am’ and then I changed it to ‘just after’ and forgot to remove ‘about’

  7. Biwa
    Commented on
    2013/12/01 at 10:15

    correction:
    >one of them has spent his high school days in Alaska
    ⇒one of them spent his high school days….

    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for your messages. :) It’s always really nice meeting your old friends.
    Well, let me do some survey report on guns in Alaska. Surprisingly, guns didn’t seem that foreign to my friend. In Alaska, many people hunt and fish. They use guns to shoot bears which come to get their catch(salmons)! They sometimes meet wild animals when they drive, so some people have guns in their cars for protection. Also, quite a few people go to shooting ranges for fun. Japanese assignees(I wonder if you can use this word as 駐在員) were no exception. He said he has used both rifles and guns a few times, and that rifles were easier to aim. Small guns are more difficult because they kick when you fire them. Anyway, that means even a highschool student was able to fire a gun at least until the ’80s. Also, you just need an ID and some money to buy a gun, no trainings were required. However, interestingly, the gun murder rate in Alaska is relatively low compared to other states, just as Michael Moore mentions Canada in the video. Anyway, guns seems to be something very natural, or even essential to some people in their lives.

    I know things are not that simple, but my friend’s story made me think that actually knowing how powerful a gun is might be helping people to never using it against humans. When you teach your children how dangerous something can be(knives, hammers, etc), the best way is to let them actually touch or see the dangerousness, right? Anyway, I really think that people who own guns are strongly required of their morals just as much as they have their rights to own them.

  8. YU
    Commented on
    2013/12/01 at 6:11

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    Something has been wrong with my computer and I bought a new PC today. It might take a bit time to set up the new PC.

    Hi Kattie,

    I just woke up around 4AM that day because my son still coughs during the night time(He had a pneumonia last month). I tried to go to to bed, but I couldn’t fall asleep again.

  9. Kattie
    Commented on
    2013/12/02 at 1:00

    Hi Yu,

    >I just woke up around 4AM that day because my son still coughs during the night time(He had a pneumonia last month
    That sounds nasty, I hope he gets better soon.