Home > Blog > Sochi 2014 (Feedback)

February 28th, 2014 | Author: David

Sochi 2014 (Feedback)

Thanks for all your comments. I will have a TV in the new house, so I will be able to watch sporting events live. That will be nice!

I noticed that there have been a lot of stories in the international press this week about the results of the figure-skating competition. A lot of people are worried that if viewers can’t understand how the scores are decided, they will just lose interest in the sport. I hope they will figure out a way to make it fairer and more transparent.

Here is some feedback on this week’s comments.

and hoped that she would able to perform in her free program at her satisfactory level.
and hoped that she would be able to perform at her true level in the free program.

After a short time I read the full text he spoke.
I read the full text of his comments.

so the only things I know are what I’ve seen in the highlights which were aired in the morning news.
Nice sentence, but “which were shown on the morning news” would be more natural for the last part.

her performance at the short program ended up a horrible one.
her performance in the short program ended up being horrible.

As for Mr.Mori’s remark, I won’t be surprised at it at all.
It didn’t surprise me at all. (Me neither! See my older entry The Old Boys’ Club.)

I’ve never seen a popular Japanese skater like her before.
I’ve never known a Japanese skater to be as popular as she is. (I think that is what you want to say.)

we also went to skate after long interval
we also went skating for the first time in ages

I didn’t know that Mr.Hanyu is suffering from asthma.
suffers from asthma. (I didn’t know that either!)

Mori is the last person we want to be the chairman of the Olympic committee!
That is also a good way to put it, and very true. The Chairman of the London Olympic Committee was Sebastian Coe, an Olympic medallist and a very popular figure. Why does Japan keep choosing these ridiculous old men for every position of power?

Does “the last person” always have to be continued by a relative clause? In my Japanese dictionary, there is an example like this; “She is the last wife for a farmer.”
No, it doesn’t, but relative clauses are common. The example in your dictionary is weird. I would say, “She is the last person who should be a farmer’s wife.” The dictionary sentence sounds more like 農家の最後の奥さん.

they sometimes let the other team get one point in order to get two points themselves.
Nice sentence.

My husband told me that he should learn some winter sport from now to take part in the next winter Olympic games in South Korea.
That is definitely something you could think about for your son. I used to think about it when I lived in Hokkaido. Ski-jumping is really popular there, but almost no one in Britain can do it. I thought that if I had kids, and if they could become even low-level jumpers in Hokkaido competitions, they would easily qualify for the British Olympic team. I’m guessing that the Indonesian ski-jumping team is not much stronger than the British one, so send your son to Hokkaido!

First, I do not have a TV. Second, it is political.
Same opinion as me. On both points!

Talking about Mr. Mori’s comment, this is not the first time with his gaffes.
This is not his first gaffe. (The problem with these old men is that in Japan, they are surrounded by people who suck up to them, and no one ever tells them to shut up.)

That’s all for today. Have a great weekend.

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Comments

  1. David
    Commented on
    2014/02/28 at 7:11

    Hi everyone,

    Sorry, I made a mistake when I published this entry, so no one could see it. I hope you can all see it now. Thanks to amo for letting me know about the mistake.

  2. YU
    Commented on
    2014/03/01 at 10:40

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    >I’ve never seen a popular Japanese skater like her before.
    - I’ve never known a Japanese skater to be as popular as she is. (I think that is what you want to say.)

    I see. I wanted ro say “彼女のように人気のある日本人のスケート選手は今までに見たことがありません”. Does my sentence sound unnatural or it it just grammatically wrong?

    Actually, I don’t really understand what “to be” before “as popular as she is” in your sentence means. Can you also say “I’ve never known a Japanese skater as popular as she is” omitting “to be”?

    Incidentally, may I ask you if the sentence below makes sense?

    -I’ve never known a more popular Japanese skater than Mao Asada.

    > That is definitely something you could think about for your son.

    Maybe, but there’re some problems.

    1. We don’t know if he is interested in things like that.

    2. He holds dual citizenship at the moment, but we don’t know if he will choose Indonesian nationality later(when he turns 18). If he became Japanese finally(very likely!), he would have almost no chance.

    3. I want to spend time with him!

  3. David
    Commented on
    2014/03/01 at 4:09

    Hi YU,

    “See” is a bit unnatural in this context. You can omit “to be” from my sentence grammatically, but the meaning becomes a bit unclear. How about something like “She is the most popular skater Japan has ever produced”?

    “I’ve never known a more popular skater than Mao Asada” is okay, but it sounds as though you know her personally. You can clarify this by using “to be,” as I did in my sentence.

    “I’ve never known a skater to be as popular as Mao Asada.”

    That makes it clear that you are not saying that you know her personally, but rather that you know her to be popular. Basically, I think the problem is that Mao Asada’s popularity is not based on what you know. It’s more objective than that, so something like the example at the end of the first paragraph above would probably be more natural.

    Hi Biwa,

    I tried to email you about Read to Write Junior many times, but for some reason, my server won’t let me send an email to your address. If you have another one, could you let me know?

    Thanks.

  4. YU
    Commented on
    2014/03/01 at 5:05

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your answering my questions.

    > You can clarify this by using “to be,” as I did in my sentence.

    I never thought that my sentences without “to be” sound as though I know her personally. Thank you.

    > How about something like “She is the most popular skater Japan has ever produced”?

    “As far as I know”, though, yes, that’s what I wanted to say.

  5. Biwa
    Commented on
    2014/03/01 at 10:22

    Hi David,

    Sorry for my late response. I’ve come down with a fever since last night so I was in bed all day. I got your email sent at 15:58, so first, I’ll do a 返信for that one. Please let me know if you can’t receive it.

  6. Anne
    Commented on
    2014/03/02 at 5:46

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    >As for Mr.Mori’s remark, I won’t be surprised at it at all.
    It didn’t surprise me at all. (Me neither! See my older entry The Old Boys’ Club.)

    —-I should have said, “I was not surprised by it at all.”
    Actually, when I wrote this, I also had another idea in mind: “彼が何を言ったとしても驚かない.”I wanted to refer to his usual behavior not what he said this time. I mixed up tow ideas. Then I used “won’t.” If I want to refer to his usual behavior or remarks, does the following sentence make sense?
    * I won’t be surprised whatever he says, since he often does the same thing.

    *I won’t be surprised by his remarks at all since his remarks have caused a lot of problems.

    Hi Biwa,
    I hope you feel better soon.

  7. Fumie
    Commented on
    2014/03/02 at 6:36

    Hi David,

    Thank you so much for your feedback! It was interesting to talk about the Sochi Olympics.

    Hi Biwa,

    Are you okay? I hope you will recover soon. Take good care of yourself!

  8. Tsuneko
    Commented on
    2014/03/02 at 1:50

    Hi David and everyone,

    Thanks a lot for your feedback. It was fun to read your story of ski-jumping:)

    I went skating last week and I was happy I was still able to skate, so I feel like going skiing now.

    Looking forward to your next topic.

  9. Biwa
    Commented on
    2014/03/03 at 10:33

    Hi Anne and Fumie,

    Thank you for your kind words. I feel much better today, but I still cough, and my voice is terrible. I wonder why it’s either on the weekend or when my husband gets back from a long business trip that I get sick. Maybe I relax too much! Does it happen to you, too?

    Hi David,

    Thank you for the feedback.
    >The dictionary sentence sounds more like 農家の最後の奥さん.
    I looked up the phrase in the British National Corpus, and learned that there was no such expression. However, I found the same 農家の奥さんexample in Weblio(on-line dictionary), too. I must be careful when I see this kind of old-fashioned examples.