Home > Blog > Neighbourhood Councils (Feedback)

March 21st, 2014 | Author: David

Neighbourhood Councils (Feedback)

Thanks for all your comments. I noticed, however, that we are starting to get lots of really long comments again. Please try to keep your comments as short as possible so that lower-level English learners will not be scared to join in.

Thanks also for the advice about my neighbourhood council. I am going to a meeting on Sunday evening. That will be a nice chance for me to introduce myself and meet all my neighbours. I will definitely try to find out a bit more about this 入会金 before I pay it!

Actually, I quite like the idea of being a part of the local community. I grew up in a small village in Wales where everyone knew everyone else. It would be nice to have something like that in Japan. Anyway, I’ll let you know how I get on at the meeting.

Here is some feedback on your comments.

many residents of the same family names(4 names ; Sato, Ito, etc..) live in my area.
That sounds like the whole of Japan! Actually, “with the same family names” would be more natural.

… are in charge of the board members by turns
… take turns being in charge of the board

No wonder why Japanese children start bullying friends.
No wonder Japanese children start bullying one another.

50,000 yen for just joining the neighborhood council?!! That’s impossible.
“That’s ridiculous” would be more natural than “That’s impossible.”

I’d never heard that someone has paid an enrollment fee in my life
I’d never heard of someone paying an enrolment fee in my life

I wonder if there is any difference between the phrases “what kinds of things” and “what kind of things.”
It’s the same. Either is okay.

Actually, I don’t feel that I benefit from joining ours at all.
This is a really small mistake, but I’ll point it out because it highlights the correct usage of “join.” As I wrote in the A-Z, “joining” is the act of becoming a member, so you can only do it once, and then you are a member. You could write “I don’t feel that I have benefitted from joining…” or I don’t feel that I benefit from being a member,” but not “I don’t feel that I benefit from joining.” Hope that makes sense.

That’s all for today. Have a great weekend.

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Comments

  1. YU
    Commented on
    2014/03/21 at 11:18

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    I’m very sorry for my long comments. I’ll try to keep my comments as short as possible. I wonder if you can set a limit for the length of comments(the number of letters) as many other bloggers do.

    Have a nice weekend, all!

  2. Biwa
    Commented on
    2014/03/22 at 7:07

    Hi David,

    Thank you for the feedback.
    Your explanation for the correct usage of “join” is very helpful. Actually, I have made the same mistake before by saying “if he joins Nikkyoso or not” (I can tell because I have written it down in my AZbook!) I hope I don’t forget next time!

    >“That’s ridiculous” would be more natural than “That’s impossible.”

    This is very helpful, too. I just used it as I would say “あり得な~い!”
    By the way, my mother used to listen to Andy Williams when I was a child, and one of the songs I remember is “It’s impossible.” Have you ever heard of it? “Tell the sun to leave the sky, it’s just impossible♪♪”

  3. ashmoleanmuse
    Commented on
    2014/03/22 at 12:30

    Hi Biwa,

    “あり得な~い!”

    In that case I would say, “No way!” I’m not sure if David appreciates this American slang though.

    Ash

  4. ashmoleanmuse
    Commented on
    2014/03/22 at 12:44

    Hi David,

    > Please try to keep your comments as short as possible so that lower-level English learners will not be scared to join in. <

    Yes, KISS is important!

    Ash

  5. Kattie
    Commented on
    2014/03/22 at 5:50

    Hi everyone,

    We don’t have these councils in the UK, there are local groups like neighbourhood watch schemes, art groups etc but there’s no pressure to join them.

    Tom and another friend of ours have recently joined a local art group and I love hearing about the meetings. Like your councils, the group is dominated by older people, it seems they do very little actual artwork but they are obsessed with the tea rota and the minutiae of the annual art event which they hold in the summer. It really makes me laugh. The annual subscription is £30 and you are only able to join if you are of a certain standard and have been recommended!

    Hi David,

    Glad to hear you’re in your new house, you must really appreciate it after all these months.

    Re: our new house. We are permanently covered in paint but we’re enjoying it. When we moved in, the house was barely habitable, the electrician couldn’t quite believe that we were actually moving in but it’s surprising how much you get done when you have to.

  6. Fumie
    Commented on
    2014/03/22 at 11:13

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback!
    Usually, country sides are more likely still keeping old traditions and younger people don’t like follow that idea thus they tend to move to cities. Maybe your city is like that and charge citizens high admission fee to join neighbourhood council.

    Hi Kattie,

    > We are permanently covered in paint but we’re enjoying it. When we moved in, the house was barely habitable~

    - It seems you both did a wonderful job!

  7. ashmoleanmuse
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 12:02

    Hi Kattie,

    A neighbourhood watch scheme can help to prevent crimes, but here is a case that went wrong. George Zimmerman, a neighbourhood watch volunteer in the US saw Trayvon Martin walking in his neighbourhood and followed him because Zimmerman assumed Martin was going to do something wrong. They got into a fight and Zimmerman shot Martin.

    Ash

  8. Anne
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 12:04

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    I think people in the countryside have a lot more community activities. I hope you’ll enjoy them.

    Hi kattie,
    Thanks for sharing the story about the local art group. It made me laugh. I don’t know why, but I remember a book called “Calendar girl.” The story is completely different from yours, but it’s the story of a group of Yorkshire women.

    > We are permanently covered in paint but we’re enjoying it.—-That’s amazing.

  9. Anne
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 12:16

    it’s me again.
    Sorry, a book called “Calendar gir” should be “Calendar Girls.”

  10. Anne
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 12:26

    It’s embarrassing!.
    Title of the book is “Calendar Girl.” Actually, I also watched the movie.

    It’ll be getting warmer tomorrow(today!). I really hope so.

  11. Kattie
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 7:07

    Hi Ash,

    I heard about that case and I think it’s one of the many problems which arise from legalising guns. In the UK, I think Neighbourhood Watch schemes are really about keeping an eye on what’s happening in your neighbourhood and simply reporting anything fishy, they’re also occasionally involved in things like clean up operations. I don’t think there are membership fees. Do you have them in Japan?

  12. Biwa
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 7:08

    Hi Ash,

    Thanks for your help.
    Yes, I was thinking of other appropriate expressions too, and perhaps “That can’t be true!”, or simply, “Unbelievable!” might be similar to あり得な~い. These short answers are often the most difficult for me.

    Hi Kattie,

    >but they are obsessed with the tea rota and the minutiae of the annual art event

    I can easily imagine that! (lol!)
    Glad to hear that you’re gradually getting done with your house. I’m always impressed with your vitality!

  13. YU
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 11:38

    Hi everyone,

    My city’s latest PR brochure reports that both the number of children association and the participation rate have fallen off remarkably in recent years(1990:220groups/97%, 2013:95/43%). They analyzed that outrageous hard work given on board members and women’s participation in society has a lot to do with it, so proper reforms should be done urgently. I couldn’t agree with them more. I’m not against community associations at all, but I don’t think the work should be too heavy a burden for people.

    Hi Kattie,

    It sounds “a select club” hearing the requirment, but they actually get together mainly for some chitchat over tea!?

    > Do you have them in Japan?

    I don’t think there’s a group to prevent crimes in my place like Ash mentioned, but I know we have a negibourhood fire brigade. I sometimes see parents of school children partol riding their bikes too.

  14. ashmoleanmuse
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 2:15

    Kattie,

    > In the UK, I think Neighbourhood Watch schemes are really about keeping an eye on what’s happening in your neighbourhood and simply reporting anything fishy, Do you have them in Japan? <

    As YU had already answered, we don't have them. If we had, I would have suffered from a kind of Anatidaephobia!

    Ash

  15. ashmoleanmuse
    Commented on
    2014/03/23 at 2:23

    Kattie,

    I want to add below.

    I think Neighbourhood Watch schemes might help to prevent child abuse and neglect.

    Ash

  16. Biwa
    Commented on
    2014/03/24 at 8:21

    Hi YU,

    >but I don’t think the work should be too heavy a burden for people

    I totally agree.
    I have helped with the PTA work at my sons’ kindergarten and schools four times in total, and once with the neighborhood children’s association. However, in retrospect, most of the work was not as hard as I had thought at first. I like to think that if other parents were able to do the work, it can’t be something that scary or difficult to manage for me. It also gave me a chance to meet other parents, learn how the events are carried out, and be thankful to all people who are involved.

    Hi Kattie,

    In my home town, the neighborhood council used to operate the weed-mowing around the shrubs at each block. I remember doing this wearing a hat because it was usually done in the hot summer!