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Thanks for all your comments. It feels nice to be back into the rhythm of my regular Japanese life after the summer break! Actually, I have a difficult job to do today. I have to go around the house with the builder and decide the locations of all the wiring.

All my friends who have built houses tell me this is the area in which they made mistakes. They said that either they didn’t have enough electrical sockets, or they were in the wrong place. I think I have a good idea of what I need, but I’m sure I will make some mistakes too. Anyway, the frame of the house is done now, so you can go in and walk around. It’s actually bigger than I thought it would be, and I’m really looking forward to living there.

I think that this week’s topic is a very important one for modern-day society, and I think the commercial did a very good job of highlighting the problem. When you walk into a university classroom these days, the first thing you notice is lots of phones plugged into sockets all around the room. I use my phone quite a lot, but it always lasts through the day, so I wonder what these students are doing that makes them need to recharge them so often.

When I go to restaurants, I often see couples who are using their phones and basically ignoring each other, and I often see mothers walking along with young children totally engrossed in their phone with no idea where the children are or what they are doing. I know that I use my phone too much as well, so one thing I decided is to leave it in the car when I go into a restaurant (unless I am by myself). Do any of you have strategies for reducing your dependence on your phone?

Here is some feedback on this week’s comments.

I think the video image itself is pretty ordinary
“Pretty ordinary” and “nothing special” sound very negative, but then you said “It touches our heartstrings.” Those comments do not really go together.

As I might have told you before, I still have a ガラケー
“As I might have told you before…” is a useful phrase for everyone to learn if you don’t know it.

Their message makes a sense.
Their message makes sense.

I think it’s mundane still tells us the beauty of nature and of interaction between people when we meet them in person.
Again, “mundane” has very negative connotations. I’m not sure it’s the right word here. And “reminds us of” would be more natural then “tells us.”

Those are the downside of mail but the upside is we don’t bother others by stopping them what they are doing at that moment when we telephone them.
That’s a good point.

> It’s not very usual for a mobile phone company asks their users to refrain from using on the phones, isn’t it?
It’s not common for a mobile phone company to ask their users to refrain from using their phones, is it?

I saw video above and I felt it could be me…
Me too!

My wife doesn’t like this, so she was notifying this to me many times
My wife doesn’t like this, and she has asked me not to do it / she has warned me about it many times.

I found a lot of people were sharing this commercial on Youtube, so it seems that many people have been interested in it.
Yes, I think it has become a bit of an Internet sensation!

One thing for sure is that this ad tells you the importance of being connected with the real world including nature.
Indeed.

If so, I’ve heard of the name several times.
If so, I’ve heard it mentioned several times.

I’m going to have a surgery tomorrow, and the doctor says I can go home on Monday or Tuesday if nothing bad happens.
Hope to read your comments from home next week instead of from the hospital!

It is true that more and more companies in Japan are getting conscious of work-life balance of their employees, but I still think bad customs die hard.
I think Japan still has a long way to go in terms of achieving a work-life balance.

I think it’s a bit exaggerated. If I am with someone (or some people,) I usually focus on that, so I don’t check my phone.
That’s nice, but if you look around you next time you go to a restaurant, I’m sure you will be surprised!

Did you look up the sky last night? If so, were you lucky enough to see the harvest moon?
Yes I did, and yes I was. It was beautiful.

That’s all for today. Have a great weekend, and let me know if you have any questions about my feedback.

40 Comments

  1. YU on Friday September 20th, 2013 at 03:32 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    >“Pretty ordinary” and “nothing special” sound very negative

    I know it and in fact I meant negative with it.

    > but then you said “It touches our heartstrings.” Those comments do not really go together.

    I don’t really understand why they do not go together.
    What I wanted to say was :
    「映像自体はかなりありふれたものだけど心に響くものがある」
    Probably I should have written,
    “The image of the commercial itself is pretty ordinary, but its contents touch our heartstrings.”??

    It used to be said that if couples start reading magazines each other at the coffee shop, it’s the end of their relathionship because it shows that they aren’t interested in their partners any more. I heard that today many couples chat online even their partners are in the same room or check their phones when they’re dating. I know I’m very old-fashioned, and it’s not my business, but I never want to be like them. I think it is very rude. I would be very angry if my husband did it.



  2. Anne on Friday September 20th, 2013 at 04:30 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    >When I go to restaurants, I often see couples who are using their phones and basically ignoring each other—I guess, iphones(or cellphones) have been replacing manga or magazines. This could happen to my family.

    >All my friends who have built houses tell me this is the area in which they made mistakes–I hope you’ve done successfully today!

    Hi Biwa,
    I hope the surgery goes well.



  3. David on Friday September 20th, 2013 at 06:53 PM

    Hi YU,

    It makes sense if you add “but.”

    Hi Anne,

    It took three hours, but I think we figured it all out. I will have another chance to change things after the switches and sockets go in, but before the walls are plastered.



  4. Fumie on Saturday September 21st, 2013 at 12:16 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    You must be very exciting to see your house is going to be built.

    >I decided is to leave it in the car when I go into a restaurant (unless I am by myself). Do any of you have strategies for reducing your dependence on your phone?

    That’s a very good strategy. Though I can’t do that because I want to be known immediately if something happened to one of my family.
    Cellphone is really convenient though I think it deprives people’s free time. Sometimes my husband’s cellphone rings on weekend and I don’t know whether I should wake him up or not when he is taking a nap. Mostly those calls are from his company asking him about job relating matters.

    Have a fabulous weekend, everyone!



  5. Anne on Saturday September 21st, 2013 at 04:52 AM

    Hi David,

    So, you have another chance to change where to fix. Good for you:) Anyway, you must be thrilled to live the new house.



  6. YU on Saturday September 21st, 2013 at 09:02 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your answer, but I used “but” in my original sentence, too. Here it is ;

    > I think the video image itself is pretty ordinary, there’s nothing special about it, but this commercial touches our heartstrings.

    So, I still wonder what was wrong with my sentence…

    Hi David and Fumie,

    > so one thing I decided is to leave it in the car when I go into a restaurant (unless I am by myself).

    It sounds very effective, but I’m afraid I think it’s dangerous to leave your phone in the car. Isn’t it possible for you to refrain from using it when you’re at the restaurant with someone? It doesn’t last more than three hours at longest, does it?
    I started feeling like as if I were talking about how to stop smoking with a heavy smoker!! hahaha… I’m joking, but it seems to be very true that smartphones are addictive as other member mentioned.



  7. Fumie on Saturday September 21st, 2013 at 10:27 PM

    Hi YU,

    >Isn’t it possible for you to refrain from using it when you’re at the restaurant with someone?

    Yes, I can do that. I’m not a mobile phone addict or I became a bit phone(mail) phobia after I was swamped with lots of mails about Kodomokai. I am kind of scared just hear the sound of noticing me that I got a mail.



  8. YU on Sunday September 22nd, 2013 at 09:59 AM

    Hi Fumie,

    Sorry, I didn’t mean you’re a heavy mobile phone user.
    You wrote “That’s a very good strategy.” for David’s idea of leaving his phone in the car, so I addressed my comment to David and you because I thought it was very dangerous to leave it in the car.

    I hope you’ll get me.



  9. Fumie on Monday September 23rd, 2013 at 12:09 AM

    Hi YU,

    Don’t worry. I didn’t think you considered me as a heavy mobile user and I thought you just advice David and me not to leave a phone in the car.
    大丈夫です。ユウが私のことヘビー携帯ユーザーと感じてるとはかんじなかったし、ただ車に携帯置いとくのは危険よと言ってくれてるんだと思ってました。:-)



  10. raku on Monday September 23rd, 2013 at 08:28 PM

    Hi Biwa
    I’m sure you’ll be up and about soon!
    Take good care of yourself.
    Biwaさんに何か励ましの言葉を考えていたら、遅くなりましたすみません。
    Hi David
    お題の「A Thought-Provoking Commercial from Thailand」に関しては英語で感想を書くのに、私はとても時間がかかりますので、またこの次という事で失礼します。
    では、皆様これからもよろしくお願いします。



  11. David on Monday September 23rd, 2013 at 10:35 PM

    Hi everyone,

    I’ve got a really busy week this week (It’s ten o’clock in the evening on a public holiday and I’m still in my office!), so I might not be able to do a new entry. Feel free to comment on anything that interests you!

    Hi YU,

    Sorry, I must have misread your original comment, but it still seems a bit unnatural. I think the problem is that the contrast between the negative and the positive is too strong. It’s not grammatically wrong, but it just sounded a bit strange to me.



  12. Biwa on Tuesday September 24th, 2013 at 08:46 AM

    Hi everyone,

    Thank you very much for all your kind words.:) Everything went fine, and I came back home yesterday. Hooray!
    I still have pain in my back and chest, and I get feverish in the afternoon. The doctor says it happens because my body is trying to heal. Anyway, it’s really nice to be at home, especially when you have meals.

    Hi raku,

    Thanks! The expression ‘to be up and about’ was new to me.

    Hi David,

    Are you going to write a new book? I hope working until ten is not your regular Japanese life!
    By the way, if you’re going to have a loft in your new house, make sure you have electrical sockets there, too. We don’t have any in our loft, so I always have to use extension cords whenever I want to vacuum the floor or use an electrical fan to ventilate especially during the summer.



  13. Mika on Tuesday September 24th, 2013 at 03:07 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    I’m glad to hear that you was discharged from the hospital.
    You still have pain, so please get a lot of rest.



  14. YU on Tuesday September 24th, 2013 at 08:05 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    It’s nice to see your comment here again!
    Please take a good rest. 🙂

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your reply.
    I got it, just my sentence wasn’t natural.

    I know you’re very busy this week, but may I ask what the most natural way to say “英語学習者” in English is?

    I think “learners of English” is the most natural, but how about “English learners”? Is it a wrong expression?
    My company’s model answer says, “English learners” doesn’t mean 英語学習者, but it means イギリス人の学習者, so it’s wrong.
    In fact, when you say 日本人の英語学習者 in English, you say “Japanese learners of English”, so is my company’s explanation right?



  15. Fumie on Tuesday September 24th, 2013 at 09:30 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    I’m glad to hear that everything went fine and you came back home. Take care of yourself!



  16. Anne on Wednesday September 25th, 2013 at 07:53 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    How are you feeling today? I’m glad to hear you got back home. Take a good rest!



  17. Biwa on Wednesday September 25th, 2013 at 11:03 PM

    Hi Mika, YU, Fumie and Anne,

    Thanks for your kind words. I’m feeling better day by day.

    Hi YU,

    Regarding your question, I think your company’s explanation is correct. However, I sometimes see expressions like “English learners” or “English speakers” in some ESL sites. I think it’s okay when the meaning is clear between the writer/speaker and reader/listener. (This is just my idea so I’d like to hear what David says, too.)



  18. David Barker on Thursday September 26th, 2013 at 12:02 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    Glad to hear everything is okay. You had us worried there for a minute!

    Hi YU,

    There is no “correct” answer to this question. Because of the way English grammar works, an “English learner” can be a person who is learning English or a person who is learning something and who was born in England. The meaning is usually clear from the context. If the meaning is not clear from the context, it is probably safer to say “learners of English” if you mean 英語学習者. Your company is wrong to say that “English learners” always means イギリス人の学習者, though. It can mean that, but it would have to be clear from the context what they were learners of in order for it to be interpreted in that way. For example, if you said “This book is great for English learners,” the only interpretation that makes sense is 英語の学習者, so it couldn’t possibly mean イギリス人の学習者 in that sentence. If it said “This book is great for English learners of Japanese,” however, イギリス人の学習者 would be the natural interpretation.

    Hope that helps.



  19. YU on Thursday September 26th, 2013 at 09:43 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    Thank you for sharing your idea!
    I think yours is basically same as David’s.

    Hi David,

    Thank you for answering my question.

    I understood that “English learners” could mean both “英語の学習者” and “イギリス人の学習者” depending on the context, and if the meaning is not clear from the context, it’s safer to say “learners of English”.

    > For example, if you said “This book is great for English learners,” the only interpretation that makes sense is 英語の学習者, so it couldn’t possibly mean イギリス人の学習者 in that sentence.

    I’m afraid, but I still don’t really understand why “English learners” here couldn’t mean イギリス人の学習者 because “this book” could be any kinds of books(It could be even a novel written in Chinese language!). In my opinion, from this sentence you never know if it is something related to English learning, so it could mean both 英語学習者 and イギリス人の学習者.

    It was actually a Japanese-English translation question.

    電子辞書も印刷された辞書も英語学習者にとって役立ちます。

    model answer)

    Both electronic dictionaries and printed ones are helpful to people learning English/learners of English.

    I feel that it is very similar to your example sentence of “This book is great for English learners.”, but they say using “English learners” here isn’t appropriate.
    Do you think my company means you’d better use “learners of English” here because readers never know what they are dictionaries of??
    Anyway, I’ll ask them later.

    Thank you again!



  20. David on Thursday September 26th, 2013 at 11:40 AM

    Hi YU,

    If you said “This is a great book for English learners,” I would ask you, “English learners of what?” Trust me – it doesn’t make sense with that meaning unless it you say what they are learners of or unless that information is clear from the context.



  21. YU on Thursday September 26th, 2013 at 01:13 PM

    Hi David,

    Of course, I didn’t mean that I didn’t trust you! I just wrote what I still didn’t get clearly, but my sentences must have sounded arrogant to you. Sorry.

    > If you said “This is a great book for English learners,” I would ask you, “English learners of what?”

    Sorry, I still don’t get why if you said “This book is great for English learners,” the only interpretation that makes sense is 英語の学習者, but if it said “This is a great book for English learners,” you would ask, “English learners of what?”

    To be honest, I don’t really understand what are the differences between “This book is great for English learners” and “This is a great book for English learners.”

    Why wouldn’t you ask “English learners of what?”
    in the former case, too? How can you know it only could mean 英語学習者”??
    What I wanted to say was that the book might be a Japanese grammer book and the learners might be people who are learning Japansese language and who were born in England.

    If your answer was ”これはネイティブにしか分からない感覚”, I would stop asking further questions because it is meaningless!



  22. Biwa on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 08:02 AM

    Hi David,

    >You had us worried there for a minute!

    Thanks for a useful expression. The word ‘there’ is interesting.

    Hi YU,

    I think David wanted to say this:

    1) “This book is great for English learners” and “This is a great book for English learners.”

    I don’t think David is saying that these sentences are different.

    2) In these cases, if you want to indicate イギリス人の学習者, you need to add ‘learners of what.’ I guess that is why David says it makes him feel asking “English learners of what?”
    この場合は、「イギリス人の学習者」という意味を持たせたいのなら、「何の(学習者なのか)?」を加えないと不自然だ。

    3) Or it is already clear what the English learners are learning from the conversation before this.
    もしくは、この会話の前に「そのイギリス人たちが何を学習しているか?」が明確でないと、やはり不自然だ。

    4) So in this case, the only possible interpretation for ‘English learners’ is ‘英語学習者’.



  23. Biwa on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 08:44 AM

    Hi YU,

    Just thought I might write a bit more.

    >Both electronic dictionaries and printed ones are helpful to people learning English/learners of English.

    もし、会社の模範解答のように、English learnersがいつでも「イギリス人の学習者」を指すなら、この場合、「何の」が示されていないので不自然だ、とDavidは言いたいのではないでしょうか?
    この問題のように、前後に判断できる文章がなく、1文だけの時はおそらくlearners of Englishとするのが安全だ。しかし、たとえEnglish learners と書いても、「英語学習者」と理解するのが自然だ、何故なら、「何を」学習する「イギリス人学習者」なのか?が分からないから。・・・ということではないでしょうか?



  24. YU on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 09:14 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    > I don’t think David is saying that these sentences are different.

    Of course, I know that is not what he wanted to say.

    I think I understand what he wanted to say now, thank you for your help!

    2) In these cases, if you want to indicate イギリス人の学習者, you need to add ‘learners of what.’ I guess that is why David says it makes him feel asking “English learners of what?”
    この場合は、「イギリス人の学習者」という意味を持たせたいのなら、「何の(学習者なのか)?」を加えないと不自然だ。

    つまり、逆に言えば どちらの文も English learners のみしか書かない時点で This book はほぼ英語学習に関する(役立つ)本だと確定される、ってことですかね?

    David は ”This book is great for English learners.” が Engligh learners = 英語学習者 を意味する場合なら完全な文である(特に問題ない)、という前提で説明していたのに、私はこの文は前に説明がある、もしくは「何の学習者であるか」を説明しない限り完全であり得ない、と思って議論していました。これだけでも 英語学習者 と限定される、という意味がやっとわかりました。

    See you !



  25. YU on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 09:17 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    Thank you for your 補足説明!
    自分のコメントを送信して見つけました。
    今から英語サークルに行くので後ほどじっくり読みます。

    では!



  26. YU on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 01:40 PM

    Hi everyone,

    Sorry to keep bothering you, but can I have one more question?

    Today we did a 誤文訂正問題 as follows in our class.

    Q. I heard she cried. (彼女が泣くのが聞こえた)

    A. I heard SHE CRY.

    I’ve never seen a sentence like this.
    If it were you, how would you answer?!
    I don’t understand why “she cry” is right here.
    I would understand if it was “her cry” or “her crying”.
    What kind of grammer is it?

    By the way, is the original sentence itself wrong in the first place?
    Why it is wrong?



  27. YU on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 01:57 PM

    correction :

    Why is it wrong?



  28. YU on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 02:51 PM

    Hi everyone,

    Just now I learned from my grammer book that in a sentence with a 知覚動詞 like hear, see, etc… 不定詞 cannot be used, instead you need to use 動詞の原形(原形不定詞). So,

    You cannot say

    I heard her TO cry.

    but you should say

    I heard her cry.

    But I still wonder why the answer was “I heard SHE cry.”, though….



  29. Anne on Friday September 27th, 2013 at 10:59 PM

    Hi Yu and everyone,

    As for your question about the usage of “hear”, I can’t think of any reason this answer “SHE CRIES” is correct.

    Here are my sentences that came to mind.
    Almost all are same as yours, though…

    1. I heard her cry.

    2. I heard he crying.

    3. I heard (that) she cried.
    (=I heard from someone else that she cried.)
    It’s meaning is different from the ones above.

    4. I hear (that) she cries.
    (Someone told me that she cries repeatedly or habitually.) 彼女っていつも泣くんだって、と言った感じでしょうか。

    I guess the answer that are supposed to be correct was wrong.



  30. Anne on Saturday September 28th, 2013 at 08:15 AM

    Hi again,YU,

    I’m wondering if the sentence is correct, what the sentence means.

    I heard (that) she cries. I don’t think this meas “彼女が泣くのをきいた。”, but it means “彼女は(いつも)泣くと聞いた。”
    Hmm… I’m confused… Any ideas?



  31. YU on Saturday September 28th, 2013 at 09:13 AM

    Hi Anne,

    Thank you for sharing your ideas!

    > I heard (that) she cries. I don’t think this meas “彼女が泣くのをきいた。”, but it means “彼女は(いつも)泣くと聞いた。”
    Hmm… I’m confused… Any ideas?

    I’m afraid, but as I mentioned, the original sentence is ;

    Q. I heard she “crieD”. (彼女が泣くのが聞こえた)

    and the answer is ;

    A. I heard SHE CRY.

    So, I was wondering what was wrong with this original sentence at first sight, too, but later it turned out that just it had not been translated the Japanese translation faithfully.
    (I heard she cried. という英文は文法的に有り(Anneの言うように誰かから彼女が泣いていた、と聞いたよという伝聞の意味で)、だけど、ただこの問題の場合、日本語訳に忠実に訳されていない(これは自分自身が聞いたので、伝聞ではない)ところが問題なのだ、と気づきました。ややこしいですね!)

    As I mentioned, I learned from a grammer book that the part “cry”(動詞の原形、または原形不定詞とも言う、この cry は名詞ではない!)in the answer sentence is correct, but I still think that the part “she” is wrong. It should be “her”.

    Please have a look at this site.

    http://www.englishcafe.jp/english3rd/day62.html

    As you can see from this site, verbs like feel, watch, hear, see, etc..are called 知覚動詞 and when they are used in the sentences, O(目的語)+動詞の原形, 現在分詞(ing形), 過去分詞 are followed.

    The Japanese translation is 彼女が泣くのが聞こえた, so I think 2.(知覚動詞その1) in the site is applied to this case. As you can see in the メモ, the sentence “I heard she cried.” means “she cried already”, although it sounds “present tense”(“泣く”のが) in the Japanese translation.

    But, anyway, I think the correct answer should be

    I heard “HER” cry, not I heard “SHE” cry.

    because it should be 目的語(目的格)here.

    Actually, I answered “I heard her crying.” in the class, but I think it was wrong because the Japanese translation is not 「彼女が”泣いている”のが聞こえた」, but it is 「彼女が”泣く”のが聞こえた」.
    It sounds almost same, but they seemed to be slightly different according to メモ in this site.



  32. David Barker on Saturday September 28th, 2013 at 10:31 AM

    Hi YU,

    I’m sorry, but I don’t know how to make the explanation about “learner” any clearer. If you say “an English learner” but you don’t say “of …,” the only normal interpretation of that is 英語学習者.

    イギリス人の学習者 is grammatically possible, but nobody would interpret it in that way.

    Your other question is much easier. “I heard she cry” is simply wrong. Either someone made a mistake, or there is a misprint in the textbook. It can only be “I heard her cry,” “I heard she cried,” or “I heard she cries.”

    Sorry for the late response, but I was really busy this week.

    Hope that helps,

    David



  33. YU on Saturday September 28th, 2013 at 11:05 AM

    Hi David,

    Please don’t apologize!
    I always ask you tons of questions precisely when you are very busy, don’t I?

    As for “an English learner”, I think I understand what you mean thanks to Biwa’s help in Japanese language.

    Regarding my other question, I’m glad to know that my guess was right. Actually, my friend who prepared this question told me that she felt something wrong with this answer, too, but she anyway trusted the answer because it was printed.

    Thank you for your help!

    Have a nice weekend!



  34. YU on Saturday September 28th, 2013 at 12:00 PM

    Hi Anne,

    補足です。

    この問題は英文を与えられた和訳通りに直す(誤文訂正)問題で、英文自体に何かおかしなところがあるから直しなさい、という問題ではないのです。だから和訳とは違うけど英文自体は文法的にミスはなく、これはこれで成立する(ただ伝聞の意味で)ようです。つまり、この問題のポイントは 伝聞 の hear でなく、知覚動詞の hear に直さなきゃならない、ってことだと思います。

    何かややこしいんですけど私の説明分かってもらえますか?



  35. Anne on Saturday September 28th, 2013 at 01:04 PM

    Hi Yu,
    It’s good to get the advice from David^^)

    はい、わかります。  知覚のhearなら、原形不定詞、もしくは–ingで、to-不定詞にはならない、と言うのがポイントですものね。伝聞のhearは、see,understand,gatherなども文法の本によれは同じような使い方です。
    ところで、English learners,people who are studying(learning) Englishもありだな、と思いました。

    Oh, I have to go now^^)



  36. amo on Monday September 30th, 2013 at 07:59 AM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback.

    Hope everything will back to normal and you don’t need to work that late;)

    Hi everyone,

    Have a nice day!

    amo



  37. YU on Monday September 30th, 2013 at 08:42 AM

    Hi Anne,

    >伝聞のhearは、see,understand,gatherなども文法の本によれは同じような使い方です。

    Sorry, may I ask you what you mean?
    伝聞の hear と see, understand, gather の用法が同じという意味ですか?
    それとも 伝聞の hear や see, understand, gather も知覚動詞と同じ使い方、という意味ですか?違いますよね?

    >ところで、English learners,people who are studying(learning) Englishもありだな、と思いました。

    As I mentioned, my company proposed both “learners of English” and “people learning English” as the translations for “英語学習者” in their model answer, so I think “people who are learning English” should be fine, too, but you need to be careful when you say “English learners” as David mentioned.



  38. Anne on Monday September 30th, 2013 at 09:34 AM

    Hi YU,
    > you need to be careful when you say “English learners” as David mentioned.—I got it.

    >Sorry, may I ask you what you mean?—Sorry, my comment made you confused. I should have written more clearly, and I’m afraid my understanding might be wrong. Anyway, let me tell you again in Japanese.

    1. hearーーー知覚動詞+原形不定詞/分詞
    2.それとは別の I hear that~の型

    その中には、同じような使い方として、「。。らしい」と記事などを紹介する場合に使われる。  これが、私の持っているPractical English Usage にあったので書きました。1.の場合とは使い方が違う例として。 seeは知覚動詞ですが、understand,gatherは違いますね。 すみません中途半端でした。
    以下の説明が、参考書からの抜粋です。

    *hear,see etc with that-clause

    The present tense forms ”I hear (that)…”and ”I see (that)…”are often used to introduce pieces of news which one has heard, read or seen on television.

    I hear (that) Alice is expecting a baby.
    I see(that) the firemen are going on strike.

    Some other verbs can be used like this. Common examples are ‘understand’ and ‘gather.’ These are often used to check information.

    I understand you’re moving to a new job.~Yes, that’s right.
    I gather you didn’t like the party. ~What makes you say that?

    I see (that) の使い方については以前Davidがここで教えてくれたような気がします。

    質問の答えになっていないかもしれませんが、とりあえず、言いたかったのは以上のことでした。



  39. YU on Monday September 30th, 2013 at 10:08 AM

    Hi Anne,

    Thank you for your prompt reply.
    Now I know what you mean!

    Please let me also share what I learned from my English grammer book(for high school students, though!).

    hear(~を聞く), forget(~を忘れる), find(~と分かる), understand(~がわかる)などの動詞は現在形で現在完了形の意味を表すことがある。

    I hear you quit/ted job.
    (あなたが仕事を辞めるって聞いたんだけど。)

    「聞いた」のは過去のことでも、その内容が現在にかかわっているような場合に現在形が用いられる。
    forget の場合は、 I forget her name.(彼女の名前を忘れ”た”。)のように「今も思い出せない」という場合に用いる。このように、現在形で現在完了形の意味を表す動詞は、主に、状態動詞か、動作動詞でも、「一定期間続く」という状態の性質をもったものである。 以上。

    Having read your example sentence of “I gather you didn’t like the party.”, I thought “gather” here might be one of the verbs my book explains.

    See you!



  40. YU on Monday September 30th, 2013 at 10:12 AM

    Hi Anne,

    Sorry, your book explains the same thing as mine!