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I have to say I was pleasantly surprised by the number of comments this week, so thanks to all of you who took the time to read the articles and provide more information about the problem. As I said in my comments in the last entry, I don’t think that the majority of Japanese people realize how serious a problem this could become. Actually, I read just this morning that there has been another confrontation between Chinese and Japanese boats near the Senkaku Islands. One of the problems with this situation is that losing “face” is a big deal in Chinese culture, just as it is in Japanese culture, so there is a danger that each side will be forced to escalate the dispute little by little even though they don’t really want to just because the politicians don’t want to appear weak. I guess there is not much we can do about it as individuals, but whatever Japanese people decide to do, I hope it will be on the basis of informed decisions, and not simply because it is what “strong” politicians say that you should do. Here is some feedback on your comments.

You mean you saw your first “wild” bear??
Yes – my first wild bear.

Do you aim to reduce the number of comments!?
Are you trying to reduce the number of comments!?

By the way, the advert on the BBC has been made because British (young) people are losing interest in politics as well?
Yes, I’m afraid that is true. Many British people, especially young ones, have completely lost faith in politicians. The only people less popular than politicians now are bankers, because they are blamed for the financial crisis.

When I heard Govenor Ishihara saying he(Tokyo)would buy the Senkaku Islands, I couldn’t take it a realistic story.
… I couldn’t take it seriously.

About a month ago I saw a political commentator mentioning about that.
… talking about that. (Remember that you do not need “about” after “mention” or “discuss.”)

I learned about the problem of the northern territories in school, but I have to admit that I haven’t given much thought to it.
Nice sentence.

but I can’t accept their ribald humor sometimes….
I’m guessing that you got “ribald” from a dictionary, but it is such a rare word that I had to look it up myself! I would not recommend using it.

I just can’t understand why they can do that openly, without being ashamed… Is it just cultural differences??
I think you will find it is nothing to do with culture, and a lot to do with money and greed!

As far as I remember, there was no detail in textbooks of schools because there was censorship of them in old days in Japan,as you know.
Japanese history textbooks are still censored, aren’t they?

Most Japanese innocently take peace for granted.
I think “naively” would be more appropriate than “innocently” in this sentence.

In order to protect Japan’s sovereignty, these islands should be purchased by Tokyo and then be nationalized by the Japanese government.
Following our discussion, I now understand better what Ishihara is trying to do and why he thinks it is a good idea.

I wonder why they receive job offers like that in the first place? Why do they sign the contract?
That’s a very easy question to answer! Here are three reasons for you: money; money; money.

Because individual landowners could sell their lands to foreign people at any time they like.
But this is true about anyone who owns land privately in Japan. There is nothing to stop the owner of a big piece of land in Tokyo, Hokkaido, Okinawa, or anywhere else selling it to Chinese buyers if they want to.

Nothing could be produced from indifference.
Nothing good will come from indifference.

I left Bangkok and now start a life in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
It sounds as though you are living a very interesting life!

I had a busy day today. 珍しく。。。。
You probably know how to say that in English, but other people might not, so I’ll write it here. “I had a busy day today – for a change.”

There were no any energy left when I got home from work and finished housework.
By the time I got home from work and finished the housework, I had no energy left.

I really appreciate David about this.
Thanks. If you mean 感謝, though, it should be “I’m really grateful to David for this.”

He talked nothing but something justify themselves.
The only thing he was interested in was trying to justify himself.

The more I read, the more I get confused…
The more I read, the more confused I get… (Join the club!) [This means “Me too!”]

And Ishihara is one of the representative right-wing politicians. He insists, for example, that the Nanjing massacre is made up by Chinese people.
It will never be possible for Japan and China to have good relations when politicians like this are in charge.

In short, the country of China look down on other Asian countries.
This might be true, but it is something that is often said about Japan as well.

a Japanese female politician mentioned
a female Japanese politician said, “…” (“Mention” is only used when you talk about something in passing or when the main topic of what you are saying is something else. “Mention” is not used when you report the main point that someone is making.)

I have felt “日本はなめられている” for a long time.
I understand that way of thinking, but Chinese people are thinking the same about Japan when they see Japanese people voting for a politician who claims that the Rape of Nanking never happened. It is very dangerous when the populations of two countries start to think of each other like this.

Do you know that China is exclusively developing a gas field in Japan’s EEZ, although they agreed with joint development with Japan?
I didn’t know about that.

They desperately need the ocean.
Nice sentence.

Finally I was able to find a time:
Finally, I was able to find time.

I hope it’s a bad part of them. If China really has this attitude, they will become a leading country in industry.
I was talking to a man who works for Toyota last year, and he was very worried about electric cars. Many Japanese people say that Japanese cars are the best cars in the world. It is more accurate to say, however, that they are the “best-built” cars in the world. My friend said that when the engineers at Toyota looked at the technology in the new VW turbo engines, they were amazed. Japan’s real mastery is not in the design or technology of the cars, it’s in the design and technology of the production process. Other countries can design cars as good as Japanese cars, but they can’t produce them with the same consistent high levels of quality. My friend was worried because electric cars are much, much simpler than gasoline cars, so even countries like China and India will be able to produce them with the same kind of reliability as Japanese companies, but for much less money.

That’s it for today. Thanks again for an interesting discussion. Actually, I realized as I was reading the comments that Britain has a very similar problem with the Falkland Islands and Argentina. Even though we fought and won a war with them over these islands, and even though all the people who live there want to remain British, Argentina is still claiming that the islands belong to them. I guess these kinds of problems will be around as long as there are two or more humans on the planet.

Have a great weekend, and I’ll be back on Monday with a nice easy topic.

27 Comments

  1. David Barker on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 02:50 PM


  2. Tomo on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 03:44 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback. This week’s topic was difficult for me, and I couldn’t write much, but I’ve read a lot about the problem, Nanjing massacre, “comfort women”(I knew these problems, but I didn’t know there are so many people who deny them.), and Governor Ishihara. To tell the truth, I didn’t know he was well known as a right-wing politician in the world.(and I had to check the meanings of “right/left wing” too!) I sometimes saw people say bad things about him on Japan Today, but I couldn’t understand why they dislike him. I only knew he was a big brother of Ishihara Yujiro and a writer… Anyway, it was worth studying.

    >I think you will find it is nothing to do with culture, and a lot to do with money and greed!
    >That’s a very easy question to answer! Here are three reasons for you: money; money; money.

    Ha ha ha… You are right. Money change people.

    >I had a busy day today. 珍しく。。。。
    You probably know how to say that in English, but other people might not, so I’ll write it here. “I had a busy day today – for a change.”

    I didn’t know “for a change” could be used like this. I thought it meant 気分転換. It’s interesting.

    >The more I read, the more I get confused…
    The more I read, the more confused I get… (Join the club!) [This means “Me too!”]

    I still have trouble using this structure, and I didn’t know the expression “Join the club.” Thank you!

    >and I’ll be back on Monday with a nice easy topic.

    Please, please do this. My brain needs a break!

    Have a great weekend, everyone!

    Tomo



  3. YU on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 04:32 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback!

    This week’s topic was very difficult.
    It’s not easy to comment on these kinds of topics even in my own language…

    >but I can’t accept their ribald humor sometimes….
    >I’m guessing that you got “ribald” from a dictionary, but it is such a rare word that I had to look it up myself! I would not recommend using it.

    I see.
    Then, what should I say instead?
    I wanted to say “下品なユーモア”.
    Maybe “dirty humor”??
    Or again the meaning is obvious from the context, so there is no need to say “ribald” or “dirty”…!??

    > That’s a very easy question to answer! Here are three reasons for you: money; money; money.

    ABBA!!??

    >But this is true about anyone who owns land privately in Japan. There is nothing to stop the owner of a big piece of land in Tokyo, Hokkaido, Okinawa, or anywhere else selling it to Chinese buyers if they want to.

    Yes, you’re right.
    That’s why it is becoming a big problem in Japan.
    A lot of Japanese landowners have sold their land to Chinese buyers already….
    I don’t know how reliable this information is, but it is said that China’s capital is trying to buy up land in Japan to get water resources(Hokkaido, Yamanashi), mineral resources(methane hydrate/Niigata), and even land surrounding US military bases(Okinawa)…
    It is also rumored that the Chinese government uses the individual buyers as a cover for buying up land in Japan…I’m not sure if it’s true or not, though…
    Now the Japanese government has started to enact new laws to control them, but Japan’s countermeasures are one step behind as usual.

    > I had a busy day today. 珍しく。。。。
    > You probably know how to say that in English, but other people might not, so I’ll write it here. “I had a busy day today – for a change.”

    Thank you for overestimating my English ability (笑), but I didn’t know the expression!

    > I’ll be back on Monday with a nice easy topic.

    As Tomo says, “Please!!”

    Have a great weekend !



  4. taco on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 05:39 PM

    Hello David and everyone,

    I saw an article that said a bear bit a man’s face on the street today I thought it had happened in Gifu, the same bear, but it was in Yamanashi.



  5. David Barker on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 05:56 PM

    Hi Taco,

    I don’t think it was the one I saw. My bear would never do something like that.

    I was just reading a story about the bullying case in Shiga. Having read a lot of stories like it in Japan over the years, I think I could write a manual for Japanese school administrators and teachers on how to deal with bullying:

    Stage 1: When it is brought to your attention, ignore it. Pretend nothing is wrong.
    Stage 2: When a student commits suicide, deny that there is any connection between the bullying and the suicide.
    Stage 3: When it is proved that there is a connection, apologise, bow very deeply, and promise to make changes.
    Stage 4: Wait until the media attention has died down, and then go back to doing things the same way as before.

    How many times do we have to hear the same story over and over again before someone decides to do something about it? What is wrong with these people? Are they evil, or just stupid!?



  6. taco on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 06:24 PM

    Hello David and everyone,

    “My bear…” sounds kind of cute.

    You manual is very true. I don’t think “いじめ” would disappear, but I have an idea came to mind today. People should stop using such an ambiguous word いじめ because the word contains various things. Violence is violence. Blackmailing is blackmailing. When schools cannot handle them, they should call a police immediately.



  7. Kyon on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 06:47 PM

    Hello David and everyone,

    I had a very busy day today for a change.早速使っちゃった。I consumed my full energy for meeting people to have preliminary discussions for my job.
    I am physically tired.

    Thank you very much for giving us a nice topic to think over our country. I could express my thoughts over these issues a lot(80%). So I am mentally tired.

    >Most Japanese innocently take peace for granted.

    I think “naively” would be more appropriate than “innocently” in this sentence.

    Yes, naively is better. Thank you very much,again.

    I would like to visit here again, time to time.

    Have a nice weekend, everyone.



  8. YU on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 07:36 PM

    I heard there was an emergency PTA meeting at the school in question. Apparently, the class teacher didn’t show up, and the school just answered beside the purpose.

    > How many times do we have to hear the same story over and over again before someone decides to do something about it? What is wrong with these people? Are they evil, or just stupid!?

    As I said to Fumie in the last entry, what they are interested in is only to defend their own interests and to save face.

    > Violence is violence. Blackmailing is blackmailing. When schools cannot handle them, they should call a police immediately.

    As I mentioned in the last entry, the problem is the weird evaluating systems for teachers and schools. I don’t think schools would report the problems of bullying to the police so easily, because it would directly affect their work performance evaluation.



  9. Anne on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 07:56 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    As members said, this week’s topic was difficult to express my idea even in Japanese. I was a bit tired because I had to express my thought with ない頭を絞って(how can I say this?). Anyway it was a good chance to rethink about these issues, but I hope next week’s topic is an easy one!

    >Nothing could be produced from indifference.
    Nothing good will come from indifference.
    —I had no idea about it. Thanks!

    >You probably know how to say that in English, but other people might not, so I’ll write it here. “I had a busy day today – for a change.”

    —It’s new to me,too!
    Actually, I had.

    Your four stage concerning Japanese school administrators and teachers is quite sarcastic, but sadly very true. I do hope not all the teacher are following these rules and I know some of them are tackling with these problems seriously.

    I’m going to Tokyo from Sunday and will be back Monday night. My trip is going to be “museum,museum and museum”!

    Have a lovely weekend, everyone!

    Anne



  10. Anne on Friday July 13th, 2012 at 10:48 PM

    Hi Fumie,

    Have your son’s test finished? My sons are already grown, so I’m not familiar with what is taught in school nowadays. As you mentioned, students would be more interested in politics or other lessons if they had opportunities to discuss or debate using newspapers or articles. Having said that, to provide those classes, a teacher need to prepare a lot or to have the ability,right?
    In school, if students were able to learn how to ask questions, to solve problems or to figure out what their beliefs are, it would be helpful and happy after graduating schools. To some extent, I think rote memorization is necessary, but the ones I mentioned above are also important. I guess evaluating students by those kinds of test is much more easier for teachers, and that is one of the reasons for the situation in school.
    I hope school is the place where teachers help students to build up their actual abilities and to train future workers better.

    Good night!

    Anne



  11. Fumie on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 05:48 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback!
    The topic was difficult. I thought I pushed the wrong button and I was reading the teacher’s blog.

    >By the time I got home from work and finished the housework, I had no energy left.

    I knew my sentence was incorect but I didn’t know the correct way of saying this.

    I really appreciate David about this.(My sentence)

    >Thanks. If you mean 感謝, though, it should be “I’m really grateful to David for this.”

    I mean 感謝。I have a question. Appreciate also has a meaning of 感謝、so why can’t I use “appreciate” in this sentence? I looked up in the dictionary and there are some sample sentences. “I really appreciate it.” “I appreciate your kindness.” etc. After “appreciate” comes object or sentence not people? Is that the reason I can’t use “appreciate” in this sentence?

    >(“Mention” is only used when you talk about something in passing or when the main topic of what you are saying is something else. “Mention” is not used when you report the main point that someone is making.)

    I can’t understand David’s explanation of “mention”. Could anyone translate David’s explanation into Japanese, please.

    >I’ll be back on Monday with a nice easy topic.
    Yay! Hooray!

    Hi YU,

    Your comments often make me burst into laughter.
    You are funny!!!!! The more I read your comments, the more I want to meet you in person. I imagine how you look like. My image of you is 頭の回転が速くて美しい人なんだろうなぁ~!
    When you write comments, your son is playing himself besides you? I assume your son must be a very good boy! When my sons were little, they didn’t let me do things like using computers or watching TV or talking on a phone without interrupting me. 賢い子なんだろうなぁ~息子さんにも会ってみたいなぁ~

    Hi Anne,

    The test of my son’s school was over.
    >As you mentioned, students would be more interested in politics or other lessons if they had opportunities to discuss or debate using newspapers or articles.
    Yes, indeed.
    My biggest concern right now is which university he should go. I’m looking for the ones which give students debate style eduation or practical ones.
    そんな成績良くないから、どこの大学行かせようか選べる余地はあまりありませんが、debateとか自分で考えさせる授業や、実践的で仕事に結びつく授業をしている大学に行かせたい。
    Have a wonderful time in Tokyo!

    Have a lovely weekend, everyone!

    Fumie



  12. YU on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 11:40 AM

    Hi Fumie,

    >”Mention” is only used when you talk about something in passing or when the main topic of what you are saying is something else. “Mention” is not used when you report the main point that someone is making.)

    私もなんかぼんやりとしかわからない。例文とかあればもっと分かるんと思うんですが。。。とりあえず日本語に。。。

    “mention”は何かのついでに?(付随的に?)話す時、あるいは自分が何か他のことをメインに話している時しか使えない。(だから)『誰かが言っていたこと』をメインで伝えたい場合(直接話法のこと!?)では使えない。

    say something in passing = mention it while you are mainly talking about something else らしいです。

    私は直接話法で”mention”を使ってしまっていたから間違いだったのかな~!?

    As for the differences between “grateful” and “appreciate”, これもイマイチ違いがわからない。”appreciate”の方が丁寧、とか書いてるサイトとかあるけど、なんだか怪しいわ~。

    個人的には”grateful”は継続的にずっと感謝している感じ(例えば親とか先生とかの教えに対して)がします。”appreciate”は1回こっきりというか相手のしてくれた親切に対してその都度言う感謝の言葉の気がしますが、おそらくこれも私の思い過ごしでしょうね!(笑)フフフ。。。誰か教えてくれないかしら!?

    ちなみに、”appreciate” は動詞、”grateful”は形容詞なので使い方は、

    1. 代名詞+appreciate+対象(対象の前に前置詞はいらない)

    I really appreciate your help.

    2. 代名詞+be動詞+grateful+to 人+for 対象

    I am really grateful to you for your help.

    みたいです。

    > The more I read your comments, the more I want to meet you in person. I imagine how you look like. My image of you is 頭の回転が速くて美しい人なんだろうなぁ~!

    Thank you, but the more you praise me, the more embarrased I get…
    I’m just a 中年のおばちゃん.
    Please give me an extension of half a year.
    I need to have plastic surgery for my whole body before I meet you!! 🙂

    My son is same as your sons. He disturbs me all the time, except when he eats something or sleeps.
    My son isn’t a bad boy, but not that good as you imagine! He is very shy outside our home, but he behaves like “a king” at home. The only thing I can proud of him is that he never use violence on someone else, even if his friends hit him.

    By the way, what time on earth do you get up?
    You often post your comments before 6 in the morning!

    I also sometimes imagine what kind of people other regular members here are.
    I imagine you an honest and energetic person.
    Anne – noble and sophisticated.
    Tomo – pure, helpful and kind to everyone.
    amo – young, intersting and has many friends, etc…

    When I read or hear about Osaka these days, I remember you(Fumie) before I do anybody else! That’s funny, isn’t it??



  13. YU on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 12:21 PM

    Hi Anne,

    > I’m going to Tokyo from Sunday and will be back Monday night. My trip is going to be “museum,museum and museum”!

    I’m wondering when the last time I visited a museum was…. I guess it was last year, アンパンマンミュージアム in Yokohama! How intellectual I am !!

    Weather forecast says it’s going to be very hot tomorrow in Tokyo. Please be careful of heatstrokes and enjoy your “museum” trip!!



  14. Tomo on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 04:09 PM

    Hi Fumie and YU,

    Thanks for the example sentences of “The more…”! The more examples I read, the better my understanding will be. (Did I use it correctly this time?? I hope so!)

    >”Mention” is only used when you talk about something in passing or when the main topic of what you are saying is something else. “Mention” is not used when you report the main point that someone is making.)

    YUの解釈とほとんど同じですが、2つ目の文は、「mention は誰かが話していた主要ポイント(メインポイント)について伝えたいときには使えない」 つまり mention はメインの話題からそれて、何かをついでに言ったり、軽く触れたときに使う動詞ということではないでしょうか…?

    As for the usage of “appreciate”, my understanding is that it’s a transitive verb, so it must have an object, but “people” cannot be an object for it.

    ○ I appreciate your help.

    × I appreciate you.

    I’m not sure the difference between “appreciate” and “grateful” or if there is a difference between them. I checked my Swan book and found an explanation about the difference between “grateful” and “thankful”, but I couldn’t find one about “appreciate” and “grateful.”
    “I appreciate your help.” vs “I’m grateful for your help.” Hmmm, appreciate は動詞で、gratefulは形容詞、という違いしか分かりませ~ん!

    YU – You have a good imagination, thank you!! 私の場合は pure というよりただの無知ですが、素敵な言葉の選択に感謝して、もっといろいろ勉強します!(でも来週はいや 笑)

    See you!

    Tomo



  15. amo on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 04:20 PM

    Hi Fumie and YU,

    >After “appreciate” comes object or sentence not people? Is that the reason I can’t use “appreciate” in this sentence?

    The meaning of appreciate is “be grateful for something that somebody has done” and the usages are:
    S + appreciate + Object
    S + appreciate + O’ doing
    So I think that you are right, you can’t use someone after appreciate but something.

    As you know, appreciate has some meanings:
    1. mentioned above
    2. to recognize the good qualities of sb/sth.
    3. to understand that sth is true.
    4. to increase in value over a period of time.
    When I think of these meanings, I am wondering if your original sentence could be taken different meaning. I mean, if “appreciate” were taken as the meaning 2, your sentence meant “この件についてデビットを(高く)評価する” or something like that.

    About “mention,” my translation is almost the same as the one YU did. The definition of “mention” is to write or speak about sth/sb, especially without giving much information. So I think the sentence would be corrected even if YU didn’t used 直接話法. Hope you understand what I mean.

    amo



  16. rinko on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 05:09 PM

    Hi David.
    Thank you for your feedback!

    >Japanese history textbooks are still censored, aren’t they?

    Right…There is ”教科書検定”in Japan even though”検閲”is banned in the Constitution of Japan.
    I didn’t know what is difference between them but I know there is still a dispute about this.
    Anyway thanks to your topic this week I had a very good chance to think serious problem of Japan and knew lots of opinions of other menbers. It was very good for me.
    I’m looking forward to your next entry.

    Have a nice weekend everyone!

    rinko



  17. YU on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 05:40 PM

    Hi Tomo and amo,

    Thank you for your help.
    Despite of your concrete explanations regarding “mention”, it is still not really clear to me…Am I baka?

    My dictionary gives examples as follows :

    1. I mentioned having seen her in the park.
    公園で彼女に会ったことを私は口にした。

    2. He mentioned to me that he would go fishing.
    彼は魚釣りに出かけると私に言った。

    I feel both sentences give quite much information(公園で彼女に会った/彼が魚釣りに行く), but why can you use “mention” in these sentences??
    これって『ついで』の範囲なのかしら!?

    I wish David would write about the differences between “appreciate” and “grateful” in his next book !

    Hi Tomo,

    I used the term “pure” in the literal sense – 純粋、清い
    I occasionally feel how shrewd I am when I read your comments….
    Tomoのコメントを読んでいてたまに『なんて私って擦れてるんだろう』と思うときがあって。最初に思ったのはDeath Penaltyの時かな。それまで刑務官のことをちょっと色眼鏡で見ていたから。

    Anyway, I’m very happy now because Giants won the game at the last minute just a little while ago!

    See you !



  18. Anne on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 10:49 PM

    Hi Yu,
    Thanks for your compliment! Sorry to betray your image, but if you dare to say “中年のおばちゃん”, I am just”ばあちゃん.” Haha!  I’m always amazed with your energetic attitude, sharp and smart insight. Honestly, I’ve been somehow joining here. I don’t have enough energy to react each comment…

    Hi Fumie and everyone,
    It was helpful to read you guys talks about “grateful” and “appreciate.”
    If you want to use “appreciate”, how about the following sentence?

    *I really appreciate David’s advice(help) for this.
    でも、原文を生かすにはgratefulなのかな、と思いました。

    Hi YU,
    > I’m very happy now because Giants won the game at the last minute just a little while ago!

    Yeah, good for you! Me? I shed tears…What happened to Iwase,one of the good stopper in Chunichi?

    Bye for now,

    Anne



  19. Fumie on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 11:14 PM

    Hi YU, tomo and amo,

    Thank you for helping me with my questions. I think I understand both of them mostly.

    “mention” ついでに言及する。簡単にふれる。

     grateful/appreciate
    “grateful” “appreciate”
    形容詞         動詞
                 S + appreciate + Object
    S + appreciate + O’doing

    Hi YU,

    >I need to have plastic surgery for my whole body before I meet you!!
    I do too, plus I need to lose weight!

    >He disturbs me all the time, except when he eats something or sleeps.
    See, you are clever! You can write comments even if your son disturb you. I can’t concentrate when my families are around. I often put earplugs in my ears. That’s why I get up early and read and write comments in a quiet room. I usually wake up around 4 thirty and have catsleep afternoon. The older I get, the earlier I wake up.

    >The only thing I can proud of him is that he never use violence on someone else, even if his friends hit him.
    He is a GOOD boy! You should be proud of him. 🙂

    >I imagine you an honest and energetic person.
    Thank you. I think you are right about those traits of mine. But I’m also selfish and I’m a moaner. I’m the only woman in my family, so I behave like a king at home although I behave like a nice person outside the home.

    >When I read or hear about Osaka these days, I remember you(Fumie) before I do anybody else! That’s funny, isn’t it??
    Really! My friends often said that I was not like Osakajin. I don’t know where you grow up but judging from your sense of humor, you are like Osakajin. YU こそおもろいし、大阪人みたい!

    Fumie



  20. Tomo on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 11:30 PM

    Hi YU,

    I should have followed the rule David told us and just said “Thank you!” I knew what you meant of course, and I was flattered, but you know, ちょっと照れてしまいました。 何年英語の勉強をしても、このへんはやっぱりJapaneseなんですよね~
    YUは擦れてるんじゃなくて、色んなことに興味を持って勉強しているから、ちゃんと自分の意見が持てるのだと思います。 自分の意見はしっかり持っているけど、同時によく見える目、よく聞こえる耳を持っていて、ヘンに固執したりしないところがまた潔くて好きですよ。(って愛の告白!? 笑) …というわけで、お互いpositive解釈にしましょう! 😉

    それで mention ですが、難しいですね~ 今、YUの元の文章を見てきましたが、やっぱりYUの言う通り、Someone mentioned, “セリフ.” という形に違和感を感じますね。 私は特に情報量などは気にせず「軽く触れる・話題にする」という感覚で使っているのですが、セリフを入れてしまうとその感覚からちょっとずれている気が…。 「mention + 事柄」(mention something / mention that…)という感じなら、情報量や「ついで」の範囲に関係なく、1と2の例文はOKなのでは…?

    Tomo



  21. Tomo on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 11:49 PM

    Hi again YU,

    今、Davidの Learning English Vocabulary という本を見てみたのですが、mentionの基本的な使い方として、

    mention sb’s name
    mention sth to sb
    sb mentions that…

    というのが載ってました。



  22. amo on Saturday July 14th, 2012 at 11:49 PM

    Hi Anne,

    Visiting museums? That’ nice I went to see Hermitage exhibition in Roppongi last month. How many museums are you going to visit? Anyway, enjoy your stay in Tokyo.

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for sharing your images of us. I remember once you asked me about your image and I told you that I would need more time to figure out. Come to think of it, I haven’t given you my image of you, so I tell you now.
    You are smart, logical and まじめ(I am not sure which word I should choose: serious, earnest or sober)

    Your image of me is a bit of surprising. Young?. I have to admit that I look much younger than my age(lol) My comments gave you the image that I would be young, which means my mental age is also much younger than my real age 🙁
    To tell the truth, I don’t have many friends, so I was wondering what made you think this idea.

    >これって『ついで』の範囲なのかしら!?
    I check it up in a different dictionary and it say:
    “to speak about something quickly, giving little detail or using few words” and I found some examples and they were similar to that of the ones you had found. So 公園で彼女に会った/彼が魚釣りに行く are considered less information, I am not sure though.

    About the differences between “appreciate” and “grateful” are 何に感謝するか(人か物事) as I mentioned in the last comment. I think you just can’t use appreciate for someone. If you say “appreciate you” that means “あなたを評価する.”
    If you stick to use appreciate, I would say (but I am not sure if my sentence is correct or not):
    I am appreciate you giving us these opportunities.(このような(考える)機会を頂いて感謝してます)Mmm, It’s better to use grateful, isn’t it?

    Good night and sweet dreams 😉
    amo



  23. amo on Sunday July 15th, 2012 at 01:14 AM

    Hi YU, me gain

    私は直接話法で”mention”を使ってしまっていたから間違いだったのかな~!?
    You are right. You can’t use mention in 直接話法. I think that the reason he corrected your sentence. My comment only served to confuse you further. Am really sorry.

    amo



  24. Fumie on Sunday July 15th, 2012 at 06:42 AM

    Hi everyone,

    I just found a site that tell us the definition of mention in detail although I can’t understand it. Too much English.

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mention

    I also found the one that explaining Japanese Kanji words in English. It’s interesting.

    http://hararie-japan-tokyo-tokyo.com/kanji_symbols/

    Fumie



  25. Tomo on Sunday July 15th, 2012 at 08:37 AM

    Hi Fumie and everyone,

    Thanks for the interesting links! I liked the second one.

    Everyone tried to express what Fumie wanted to say using “appreciate”, so let me try it too.

    This is her original version:

    I used to have an attitude of “I’m not interested in politics” and “It’s nothing to do with me” but I’m changing little by little. That is because David bring these matters here. I want to join you and exchange thoughts with you so I study and think about these matters. I really appreciate David about this. It opened my eyes to be interested in politics and serious matters. Thank you David!

    If I were to use “appreciate” in this case, I would change the order of the sentences a little.

    I used to have an attitude of “I’m not interested in politics” and “It’s nothing to do with me” but I’m changing little by little. That is because David bring these matters here. I want to join you and exchange thoughts with you so I study and think about these matters. It opened my eyes to be interested in politics and serious matters. I really appreciate that. Thank you David!

    Hope you are all having a nice weekend,

    Tomo



  26. YU on Sunday July 15th, 2012 at 08:59 AM

    Hi Tomo and amo,

    ありがとうございます。
    やっぱり直接話法では使えないのかもしれないですね。
    これからはその使い方はやめておくことにします。

    Hi Fumie,

    You wake up around 4:30 !! Wow !!
    Actually, I started to wake up earlier than before following your example, but still I can’t wake before 5!!

    I’m glad to know that you like my sense of humor, thank you ! Am I like Oskajin? I’m not Osakajin, but I grew up in Westen Japan and loved watching 吉本新喜劇 on TV when I was a child !!

    Hi Anne,

    Your compliments are far more than I deserve, but thank you! 🙂
    I don’t think you are just a ばあちゃん, I think you are a gentle-mannered, sophisticated woman. I always feel it through your choice of words. And that cannot be accomplished in a single day.

    Re Iwase, I’m sorry for him, that was nothing but a tragedy for him, the team and Dragon’s fans…
    Though Dragons is the biggest rival for Giants, I want Asao to come back as soon as possible!!

    Hi amo,

    You look much younger than your age? Lucky you!!
    I imagine you a young woman(at least younger than me!) and have many friends, because you sometimes discribe that you dine out with your “friends” or you have foreign “friends”. Also, you visit a museum in “Aoyama” like somewhere very fashionable… I don’t know how old you are in reality, but I never meant you’re not mentally matured!!

    Hi everyone,

    Last evening I dine out at a 回転寿司 restaurant where newly opend near my house with my family. We had to wait for more than 30 minutes before our table was ready.
    My son didn’t eat much there, so I asked him, “What’s wrong with you? ”
    He answered, “スシロー’s sushi tastes better. I won’t come here again any more!” in a loud voice!!!
    I felt a burnig shame!!
    We ended up paying the bill quickly and run away from there!
    As you know, children are very honest…
    I’m very glad that he learned to express what he wants to say, though… トホホ….



  27. Fumie on Monday July 16th, 2012 at 06:25 AM

    Hi Tomo,

    Thank you. I think your version convey my meaning better. I really appreciate everyone’s kindness!

    Hi YU,

    A ha ha, your son is cute. Yes, children are very honest and they say as they think and feel. 感じたままを言う。
    Sometimes children say something that adults can’t say though they want to tell in their hearts, instead of them.
    大人が本当は言いたいけれど、言えないことを子供が代わりに言ってくれる。

    Fumie



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