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Thanks for all the comments. It seems most people agree that there should not be a maximum age for driving, but most are in favour of having frequent tests for older drivers. To be honest, I’m not sure what the situation is in Britain, so I will ask my mum. As I mentioned in Monday’s entry, this is going to become more and more of a problem for Japan as the average age of the population keeps increasing. I also read a news report saying that fewer young people are driving than ever before, so I guess that will mean an even bigger increase in the average age of drivers.

Here is some feedback on your comments.

I totally agree with you.
This is a good expression to learn if you don’t know it. “I completely agree with you” is also very common and natural.

They were there to be checked their driving skills to renew the license.
They were there to have their driving skills checked so that they could renew their licenses.

think that it’s a nice system, though I don’t know that it’s the best way or not.
… though I don’t know if / whether it’s the best way or not.

I am not sure but 70 years old drivers have to take a test when they renew their licences.
…, but drivers over the age of 70 have to …

We sometimes hear the news which seniors drive expressways the opposite direction.
We sometimes hear stories about senior citizens driving the wrong way along expressways. (I saw an old lady doing that in Hokkaido a couple of years ago. I was very surprised!)

She lives in a countryside in Hyogo prefecture.
She lives in the countryside in Hyoto Prefecture. (A-Z: countryside)

Looking forward to hear from you again from time to time.
Looking forward to hearing from you again from time to time. (A-Z: look forward to)

You always don’t hesitate to help people you don’t know.
You never hesitate to help people even if you don’t know them. (I guess I learned that from my mum and dad. I think living in Hokkaido helped, too. Because everyone gets stuck in the snow sometimes, people are really helpful, and everyone stops to help everyone else.)

Apparently, in Tokyo, older people who have returned their driver’s license get a variety of discount at shops in Tokyo.
Thanks for the interesting link.

Then, there’s nothing you can do about it.
A good translation of 仕方がない.

My mother said to me he sometimes drives in a way like that so I told him about returning a driving license but he refused.
My mother told me that he sometimes drives like that, so I spoke to him about returning his license, but he refused.

How about putting the message(and the name of the Jyoji’s blog) in the pop-up window without a link? Anyway, let me know if there is anything I can do for you.
I might try that.

Can you watch Japanese TV with your cellphone?
Can you watch Japanese TV on your cellphone?

But it originally depends on a skill.
But it ultimately depends on an individual driver’s skill.

I’m glad hear you again!
Nice to hear from you again.

She looks much younger for her age and drives excellent!
She looks much younger than her age and drives really well.

Some of my mama tomo suddenly finished their “paper driver career” and started driving for their children.
This is really scary. They are some of the worst drivers on the road. They have a very low level of driving skills, and they are constantly distracted by their children.

1. Most elderly people can’t handle PC, so they can’t oder goods by Internet.
This is true, but of course it will change in a few years. I guess people of my age (and a bit older) will be the first senior citizens to be computer literate. We will just order everything online.

We had had a heavy rain last night but it’s cleared up:)
No need for “a” before “heavy rain.”

You’re sure of getting respect from her !!
You will definitely win her respect.

I think there is some truth in what the TV producer said. It
Nice sentence.

I posted new translation of the blog to my blog, actually I’ve already done it yesterday’s night (^_^;)
I posted a translation of the new entry on my blog. Actually, I did it last night.

Here are some suggestions from me, but I’m not sure about any of them. It’s really difficult to translate David’s entries. Now I realized how carelessly I used to read them.
Jyoji, would you prefer people to post their suggestions on your blog, or on this one? Either way is fine by me.

It sounds like your ex-girlfriends are everywhere in Japan!(in the world? LOL) 
When I was a bit younger, maybe…

I’m very worried about if his driving causes something serious.
I’m very worried that he might cause a serious accident.

Giving up driving a car meant that my parents had to ask my sister-in law to drive them when they were going out.
Very nice sentence.

I’m sure that I can’t drive anymore when I get old.
Remember that “can” is not normally used to talk about the future: “I’m sure that I won’t be able to drive anymore when I get old.”

We discuss about English sentence more detail , then I understand it more deeply!!
Discussing the English sentences in more detail will help me to understand more deeply.

So, I’m wondering if “she” in David’s entry meant “car” for “religious reasons” or just because the car was a possession of a woman(elderly woman).
“She” referred to the woman, not the car. I suppose that strictly speaking, it should be “Her car had broken down,” but in normal conversation, you can just say “I broke down on the way to work” or “He is going to be late because he has broken down.”

> It’s said in a book I’m reading that It’s not your fault when you confuse the break pedal and acceleration, it’s just a bad design.
I agree. I think the brake should be to the left of the steering column, and the accelerator to the right. People should be taught to accelerate with their right foot and brake with their left. This would reduce the confusion. With manual cars, there used to be tendency to put the brake and the accelerator as close together as possible on sports cars. This was to allow drivers to use a technique called “heel-and-toeing.” When you are traveling quickly and you brake sharply for a curve, you need to rev the engine as you brake so that you can put it into a lower gear. If the brake is close to the accelerator, you can use the heel of your right foot to push the accelerator, the toe to push the brake, and your left foot to push the clutch. All racing drivers used to have to learn this when racing cars had manual transmissions, and I guess some people (mostly men!) think it is cool to keep the same design even though most really fast cars are not automatics. Here is a video of the technique.

Actually, the same is true with bikes, so when you approach a curve on a racing motorcycle, you have to operate the clutch with your left hand, the accelerator and front brake with your right hand, the gears with your left foot, and the rear brake with your right foot. Modern motorcycles have “slipper clutches” that make it easier to change down through the gearbox when you are braking hard, but it is still a very difficult skill to master.

That’s it for today. Have a great weekend, and I’ll be back with a new topic on Monday.

36 Comments

  1. YU on 2012年06月22日 at 15:58

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback!

    > She looks much younger than her age and drives really well.

    I got it.
    How about 彼女の年代では背が高い方だ?

    She is tall for/in/than(?) her generation.

    > I guess people of my age (and a bit older) will be the first senior citizens to be computer literate.

    In the near future, we would count computer skills one of the literacy just like reading and writing?
    “読み書きそろばん”から”読み書きコンピューター”の時代へ!

    By the way, I heard that in the very near future(I think it was in 204X?), computer’s brain(!?) would surpass human’s brain. Have you heard of that?
    Lots of movie directors have been made films like that based on their imagination in the past, but it might be going to be real very soon!?

    >“She” referred to the woman, not the car. I suppose that strictly speaking, it should be “Her car had broken down,” but in normal conversation, you can just say “I broke down on the way to work” or “He is going to be late because he has broken down.”

    I see.
    Finally, it was a very simple reason.
    I was thinking too much…

    > This is really scary. They are some of the worst drivers on the road. They have a very low level of driving skills, and they are constantly distracted by their children.

    I think they’re very courageous or should I say “not smart”? A friend of mine pays 180,000yen(!) a year for her car insurance, because she’s caused a lot of accidents in the past. When I heard the amount of the premium first, I couldn’t believe my ears. I thought she must have misplaced the figure! If it were me, I would stop driving immediately before becoming a killer.
    Actually, many of mama tomo have advised me to get a driver’s license for my son, but I always felt in my mind, “It’s not your business. I don’t want to drive because I don’t want to lose him.”. I know myself better than anyone else.

    I watched the video of “heel-and-toing” technique.
    To tell the truth, I didn’t understand what you wrote in your explanation very well. I even don’t know very much about “manual” and “automatic”. I just know “an automatic” needs less driving technique. Am I wrong?
    Anyway, as trmr mentioned, something should be done about the confusion.

    Have a great weekend, everyone!

    See you!



  2. David Barker on 2012年06月22日 at 16:21

    Hi YU,

    “She is tall for her generation” would be fine.



  3. DELYTH BARKER on 2012年06月22日 at 16:22

    Ordinary car and small van drivers have to renew their license at the age of 70 and every 3 years after that. They do this by ticking boxes on the form that is sent to them indicating that they are medically fit to drive. They sign the form themselves and send it to the office.

    When they reach 70, drivers of large commercial vehicles (lorries and Buses) have to undergo an annual medical exam completed by a doctor.

    Personally, I do not agree with this system. I think all people over 70 should go for a check-up on their driving with a driving school not to take a test, but to update their driving to modern roads and traffic .



  4. Tomo on 2012年06月22日 at 16:27

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback!

    >You always don’t hesitate to help people you don’t know.
    You never hesitate to help people even if you don’t know them.

    I felt a bit strange, but I couldn’t think of “never” when I was writing this… Your correction is exactly what I wanted to say. Thank you!

    >Because everyone gets stuck in the snow sometimes, people are really helpful, and everyone stops to help everyone else.

    That’s very nice!

    >No need for “a” before “heavy rain.”

    I also wrote “a heavy rain.” It’s difficult to know whether you need “a” or not.

    Can I ask you some questions?

    1)I’ve heard that you sometimes call a vehicle(like ships and airplanes) and the moon “she”, and the sun “he” in English, but it’s more common to use “it” now. Is it true? I’ve also heard that you generally call a dog “he” and a cat “she” if you don’t know the gender.

    2)When YU said “I can’t explain English grammar as Tomo does, I’m sorry.” to Jyoji, he said, “Don’t mention it.” I learned that “Don’t mention it” is used as in ”どういたしまして” or “その話はしないで”, but my dictionary says it is used as in お礼やおわびの言葉に対する返答. I guess he wanted to say, “そんなこと言わないで”, and “Don’t say that.” or “Don’t apologize.” came to mind, but is “Don’t mention it.” also okay here?
    (Jyoji – I’m sorry if I made you feel bad. I just wanted to know when it is appropriate to use the expression.)

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for answering my questions! So you are qualified to teach Japanese to foreigners. I think you would have been a very popular teacher if there had been more Japanese students, not because of your qualification but because of your character 😉

    >I’ve taught Japanese language to foreigners as a volunteer teacher. Actually, I met my husband there.

    It was love between a teacher and a student! I like those kinds of love stories(LOL)

    >I think we can’t answer those questions because we are native speakers.
    >Being a native speaker does not necessarily mean that you know everything about Japanese language.

    I understand what you mean. It’s interesting that we can use our language with no trouble even if we can’t answer those questions. I don’t think about grammar when I use my language, but I think about grammar or the differences between things when I use English. I guess that’s because I’m not a native speaker of English. 母国語なら“何となくの感覚”でいけるのですが、英語だとまだまだですね~ 考えなくてもパッと出てくるようになるといいのですが、道のりは長いです。。

    Have a great weekend, everyone!

    Tomo



  5. David Barker on 2012年06月22日 at 16:34

    Hi Tomo,

    “She” is not used as much now as it was in the past, so I guess that is true. I’m not sure about the cat/dog distinction. I’ve never really thought about it.

    “Don’t mention it” is usually used in the way you describe. I guess Jyoji wanted to say, “Please don’t apologise.”

    Hope that helps.



  6. rinko on 2012年06月22日 at 16:38

    Hi David.
    Thank you for your feedback!

    >My mother told me that he sometimes drives like that, so I spoke to him about returning his license, but he refused.

    What silly mistakes!
    I always made the same mistakes while in junior highschool…..

    The video of heel-and-toing technique made me really surprised.I can’t imagine that all racing drivers used to do tihs in hard races at full speed!! It’s beyond human power…神業ですね
    I’m wondering if they were confused when they got back to drive their normal cars in daily life….

    Have a nice weekend everyone!

    rinko



  7. DELYTH BARKER on 2012年06月22日 at 17:46

    In Wales the assembly who decides things for Welsh people are offering free voluntary driving assessments to people over 60. I went on one of these tests and passed with WELL DONE from a lady called Shirley who tested me. I was very pleased with that .



  8. Tomo on 2012年06月22日 at 19:50

    Hello Mrs. Barker,

    Thank you for letting us know about the situation in Britain and Wales. I’m sure David is happy with the results of your test too! Free voluntary driving assessments sounds very nice. I think Japan should adopt a system like that.

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your help! I learned from your writings, too. I couldn’t have produced “as much now as it was in the past” myself.

    Hi rinko,
    I also thought it was a superhuman technique!! あのスピードで瞬時に判断して両手両足を使うなんて考えられませんね。

    Tomo



  9. YU on 2012年06月22日 at 20:24

    Hi everyone,

    Has any of you ever watched a movie called “それでもボクはやってない”?
    I watched it this afternoon.
    The film focuses on a false accusation of molester based on a true story. The contents are very realistic.
    We discussed “false charges”(death penalty) some months ago. I learned from the film that how absurd
    Japanese justice system is. It is really worth watching!

    Hi David,

    >“She is tall for her generation” would be fine.

    Thank you for answering my question.
    I’m not really good at using prepositions.

    Hi Tomo,

    > I’ve also heard that you generally call a dog “he” and a cat “she” if you don’t know the gender.
    >I’m not sure about the cat/dog distinction. I’ve never really thought about it.

    Hummmm… I felt a bit strange when I heard a native speaker called a dog/a cat “he” or “she”.
    I think it would be safer to always call them “it” for a non-native speaker of English like me.
    By the way, a friend from my English language club wasn’t blessed with a child. Instead, she has two dogs and is very fond of them. When she talks about them in English, she always calls them “she/he” or “うちの子(達)” in Japanese.

    > not because of your qualification but because of your character

    …not because of your qualification but because of your character and “BEAUTY” !! 😉

    > It’s interesting that we can use our language with no trouble even if we can’t answer those questions.

    Indeed.
    For example, it is really tough to teach when you should use “が” and “は” to foreigners. (It’s just like “a/an” and “the” for us.) After explaining them some rules, I can’t advise them anything but “You will learn it if you read many Japanese books and talked with native speakers of Japanese.” My husband talks with me every day, but he still makes mistakes in the usage of “は” and “が”. I guess it won’t be long before my son teaches Japanese language to his father.

    See you !



  10. Anne on 2012年06月22日 at 23:41

    Hi David,
    Thank you for your feedback.

    >I’m very worried that he might cause a serious accident.
    I’m afraid I made the same mistake before. I should remember the pattern “I’m worried that…”

    > in normal conversation, you can just say “I broke down on the way to work” or “He is going to be late because he has broken down.”
    —It was new to me and I’m still confused.

    Hello Mrs. Barker,
    Thank you for letting us know the situation in Wales and the UK.
    >I think all people over 70 should go for a check-up on their driving with a driving school not to take a test, but to update their driving to modern roads and traffic —I totally agree with your idea.
    Congratulations on passing the tests!

    Hi Tomo,
    As for the book you mentioned, I guess its name is “日本人の知らない日本語.” Three books have published so far and I have two of them. They are very interesting and there are a lot of things in it
    I knew for the first time.
    By the way, I went on an Alaska cruise with tour and got back to Nagoya this Sunday. I caught a cold while I was there but I’m getting better now. Anyway, I really had a great time.

    Hi YU,
    I watched the movie “それでもボクはやっていない” directed by Suou,too. I heard Mr.Suou made this movie to show how horrible situation you are in once you are accused of a false charge.

    Have a lovely weekend,everyone

    Anne



  11. Jyoji on 2012年06月22日 at 23:51

    Hi Tomo,

    >Jyoji – I’m sorry if I made you feel bad.

    Np problem, Tomo. If you found my mistake , you point out frankly!
    Actually I have a Facebook page to write English sentence, along with Japanese, but no one point out my mistake if I wrote wrong sentences.

    なかなかFacebookで英文を書いてもみんな日本語しか読まないんですよね、たとえ読んだとしても気を遣って間違いを指摘してくれないので結局間違ったままで終わってしまうんですよね、、なのでしてきて貰える場所って貴重なんです!

    I checked the word “とんでもない” on dictionary of internet website which I usually use.
    Please check the website.
    http://ejje.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%A8%E3%82%93%E3%81%A7%E3%82%82%E3%81%AA%E3%81%84

    「Don’t mention it」は「ん?」と思ったのですがこの辞書に書いてあったの信用して書いてしまいました(笑)



  12. amo on 2012年06月23日 at 02:42

    HI David,

    Thanks for your feedback:)

    I have some questions.

    >On my way into work this morning,

    When I want to say “通勤途中、”I usually use “on my way to work” so what’s the difference between “way into work” and “way to work?”

    >I’m glad hear you again!

    Nice to hear from you again.
    You not only added “to” but also changed “glad” to “nice,” so I was wondering if you are suggesting “nice to hear” is more common than “glad to hear,” or most of us used “glad to hear/see/read” on this entry so you wanted to tell us you can say “nice to hear” as well?

    >My mother told me that he sometimes drives like that, so I spoke to him about returning his license, but he refused.

    He refused to return his licence so it means he still drives a car now, so that it’s ok to say “he sometimes drives like that” but how about next sentence? in this sentence, he already returned his licence so should it be “before he returned…”?

    >We discussed a lot before he return his driver’s license Firstly the car, secondly a tractor and lastly the van.

    >“Don’t mention it” is usually used in the way you describe. I guess Jyoji wanted to say, “Please don’t apologise”

    Could you explain more clearly? because when I read jyoji’s comment, I took his words like you said “Please don’t apologise” I thought that you can say “Don’t mention it” to reply to thanks or an apology. but you said that you guessed jyoji wanted to say… so you mean it’s not appropriate to use this expression in this case? but I checked it in the dictionary and it say:

    a polite expression used to indicate that thanks or an apology are not necessary

    so could you give me some examples when you use “Don’t mention it” to reply to an apology?

    Have a nice weekend everyone;)
    amo



  13. Fumie on 2012年06月23日 at 06:12

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    She looks much younger for her age and drives excellent!(YU’s original sentence)
    >She looks much younger than her age and drives really well.(David’s correction)

    When I see YU’s original sentence, I thought we can use “for” also so I checked in the dictionary. If we say “young” not “younger” it’s okay to use “for”, right?→ ”She looks young for her age.”

    Hi YU,
    >In the near future, we would count computer skills one of the literacy just like reading and writing?
    “読み書きそろばん”から”読み書きコンピューター”の時代へ!

    >By the way, I heard that in the very near future(I think it was in 204X?), computer’s brain(!?) would surpass human’s brain. Have you heard of that?

    Oh, that era would come soon. I would be 時代の流れに取り残される!

    Hello Mrs.Barker,

    Thank you for telling us the situation in Wales and the UK. So Both you and your husband are excellent drivers. That’s great.

    Hi Anne,

    >I caught a cold while I was there but I’m getting better now. Anyway, I really had a great time.

    I’m sorry to hear that you caught a cold while you were there. Glad to hear that you feel better now.

    Hi everyone,

    Have a lovely weekend!

    Fumie



  14. amo on 2012年06月23日 at 10:40

    Hi Mrs. Barker,

    Thanks for your comments and happy for you that you passed the tests
    So in the UK, you don’t need to renew your driving licence until you reach the age of 70? I read a article the other day, and it said that there are no expiry date in the licences in some European countries. I was a bit surprised to know that.
    Anyway, please join us sometimes:)

    Hi Anne,

    Alaska cruise? It must’ve been so much fan:) Hope you are fine now.

    Have a nice day,
    amo



  15. YU on 2012年06月23日 at 18:49

    Hi Fumie,

    > If we say “young” not “younger” it’s okay use “for”, right?→ ”She looks young for her age.”

    I guess you’re right.
    That was exactly what I wanted to write, but I made a mistake.
    By the way, I found an interesting example in my dictionaly.

    A: Is today really your fiftieth birthday? You look so young.
    今日は本当にあなたの50歳の誕生日ですか、とてもお若く見えますね。
    B: That’s right. I am older than I look.
    そのとおりです。私は見かけより歳をとっているんです。

    If it were me, I could not admit that “I look young” in the first place even if it was true.
    Or maybe “That’s right” acknowledges the previous sentence, “Is today really your fiftieth birthday?”!?
    Anyway, dictionaries sometimes give us a bit weird examples… Don’t you think so?

    Hi Anne,

    > By the way, I went on an Alaska cruise with tour and got back to Nagoya this Sunday. I caught a cold while I was there but I’m getting better now. Anyway, I really had a great time.

    Wow! Lucky you!!
    It sounds very luxurious!!
    I took a voyage by ship from Hamburg in Germany to London, but the ship was not that gorgeous…トホホ

    You watched “それでもボクはやってない”?
    Actually, I watched it just by chance, because a friend of mine gave me a copy of the film the other day. I finally ended up being completely absorbed in the movie, though… She gave me another copy of a movie called “告白”. Have you heard of the movie?
    It’s a quite new film based on Minato Kanae’s mystery novel. Matsu Takako stars in the film. It is said that the movie is very scary…フフフ… I’m looking forward to watching it when my son takes a nap next time!

    Hi Jyoji,

    It seems that our frank exchange has caused quite a stir among other members…
    何か私たちの何気ないやりとり(Don’t mention it)がメンバーに思わぬ大きな波紋を投げかけたようですな~。

    > Don’t mention it!!
    とんでもございません!

    I had a good laugh with your Japanese translation “とんでもございません!” because it sounded very polite to me!! 🙂
    I know you said that by design to make me laugh, though !!

    This morning I watched an American animation called “Curious George(おさるのジョージ) with my 3 year-old son, and it reminded me of you.(I don’t mean “osaru” reminded me of you, but “George”, of course!!)You have a nice name, “Jyoji”. It is a very common male name in Western countries. You’re very lucky, so why didn’t you use “Geroge” as your name on this blog?

    A friend of mine from childhood named “Naoya” asked everyone to call him “Jimmy”, because he loved James Dean. “Naoya” has nothing to do with “Jimmy”, so almost no one called him “Jimmy” finally. I couldn’t believe his impudence too! Poor Naoya!!
    (私も彼の図々しさに結構あきれてたけど、まー憎めない奴でした。彼は実は私の幼馴染でちょっと”外国かぶれ”なところがありました。ちなみにマイケルジャクソンも大好きで崇拝してました。)

    > No problem, Tomo. If you found my mistake , you point out frankly

    Tomo is really enthusiasm, kind, and reliable.
    She is like the assistant teacher of David !

    See you !



  16. Fumie on 2012年06月23日 at 21:27

    Hi YU,

    >If it were me, I could not admit that “I look young” in the first place even if it was true.
    Or maybe “That’s right” acknowledges the previous sentence, “Is today really your fiftieth birthday?”!?
    Anyway, dictionaries sometimes give us a bit weird examples… Don’t you think so?

    Aren’t you glad when you were told you look young?
    I’m happy when someone said to me you look young even if it’s not true. 私がYUのコメントの英語をよく理解できてないからかなぁ?

    Fumie



  17. David on 2012年06月23日 at 22:14

    Hi Amo,

    “On my way into work” and “on my way to work” are exactly the same.
    “Glad to hear from you” is okay, but I think that “nice” sounds more natural. Other native speakers might disagree with me, though. Anyway, “nice” is more common with that expression.

    >He refused to return his licence so it means he still drives a car now, so that it’s ok to say “he sometimes drives like that” but how about next sentence? in this sentence, he already returned his licence so should it be “before he returned…”?
    Sorry, I don’t understand the question.

    Could you explain more clearly? because when I read jyoji’s comment, I took his words like you said “Please don’t apologise” I thought that you can say “Don’t mention it” to reply to thanks or an apology. but you said that you guessed jyoji wanted to say… so you mean it’s not appropriate to use this expression in this case? but I checked it in the dictionary and it say:

    I’m afraid it’s not possible to give clear explanations of expressions like this, and there is not much point checking them in a dictionary. Once you have understood the basic meaning, you just have to observe how they are used in natural language. In that example, “Don’t mention it” sounded a bit strange to me, but I suppose it could be used with that meaning. That is to say, it wouldn’t be wrong.

    Hi Fumie,

    When I see YU’s original sentence, I thought we can use “for” also so I checked in the dictionary. If we say “young” not “younger” it’s okay to use “for”, right?→ ”She looks young for her age.”

    Yes, that is correct.

    Hi YU,

    I watched それでも僕はやっていない a few years ago. It was really scary, but I have a feeling that it was quite a realistic representation of how Japanese police do their jobs. After watching that movie, I’m sure you can see why I don’t think Japan should have the death sentence.



  18. amo on 2012年06月23日 at 23:15

    Hi David,

    Thanks for answering my questions.

    >He refused to return his licence so it means he still drives a car now, so that it’s ok to say “he sometimes drives like that” but how about next sentence? in this sentence, he already returned his licence so should it be “before he returned…”?
    Sorry, I don’t understand the question.

    I mean, in the next sentence,
    >We discussed a lot before he return his driver’s license Firstly the car, secondly a tractor and lastly the van.

    In this sentence, he already returned his license, so I thought “before he return” should be past tense(before he returned)?
    すみません、英語では説明しにくいので、日本語で確認します。
    この文はAnneのコメントにあったと思うのですが、彼女のお父さんは既に免許を返却してるので、過去形にしなくていいのですか?と聞きたかったのです。
    わかってもらえたでしょうか?
    amo



  19. Jyoji on 2012年06月24日 at 01:26

    Hi YU,

    Thank you for reminding my first name “JYOJI”.

    “おさるのジョージ” was only picture books when I was a child.
    I never know it broadcast on TV, and I want to try watching it if it broadcast not early in the morning (^^;)
    However when I was a elementary school student , my friend made fun of me to call “おさるのジョージ~~”. Now it’s a good memory for me.

    And you guys may not know … I was also made fun of by my friends another character “トッポジージョ” . It is a character of mouse, and was broadcast on TV (but I didn’t remember).

    >so why didn’t you use “Geroge” as your name on this blog?
    My last name is “IRISA”.
    “George Irisa” … It’s like foreign name!! What do you think?(笑)
    I used the name “George” in days gone by on this blog and e-mail signature, but I became ashamed gradually because my face is perfect Japanese!!.

    see you!!



  20. DELYTH BARKER on 2012年06月24日 at 03:26

    Hello Anne
    thank you for. the reply to my views on driving . I will join you from time to time when I have something of interest to say.

    Regards to you all in Japan

    Delyth Barker



  21. DELYTH BARKER on 2012年06月24日 at 03:41

    sorry Amo I meant to address that to you
    Delyth Barker



  22. YU on 2012年06月24日 at 07:46

    Good morning Fumie,

    >If it were me, I could not admit that “I look young” in the first place even if it was true.

    >Aren’t you glad when you were told you look young?
    I’m happy when someone said to me you look young even if it’s not true. 私がYUのコメントの英語をよく理解できてないからかなぁ?

    I actually meant, “私ならたとえ事実だとしても自分が若く見えるという事(You look young)を、そもそもそのとおりです(That’s right)と認められないだろう(I could not admit)”って言いたかったんですが、多分私の英文がヘンなんだと思います。I was not really sure about my sentence when I wrote it. I’m sorry.
    Of course, I would be happy if someone told me, “You look young”, but if it were me, I would just say, “Thank you, but I’m not young any more.” (ありがとう、でももう若くないけどね)with a smile.

    もしかしたら例文中の”That’s right”は”You look young”に対してではなく”Is today really your fiftieth birthday?”に対しての返答なのかも知れないけどネイティブじゃない私には判断がつきかねるのでなんとなく突飛な例文に見えたんです!

    Hi Jyoji,

    “おさるのジョージ” is on the air every Saturday morning at 8:35 (教育テレビ). Is 8:35 in the morning too early for you!? 😉

    “George Irisa” … It’s like foreign name!! What do you think?(笑)

    Indeed, and it’s a very beautiful name!
    (そういえば昔ゴダイゴが”♪Everyone has a beautiful name~♪”って唄ってましたね。古っ!)

    >I used the name “George” in days gone by on this blog and e-mail signature, but I became ashamed gradually because my face is perfect Japanese!!

    Hahaha…, you don’t need to care about that at all!
    I met lots of Asian people who has an English name
    (in Hong Kong, Singapore,etc…). They all had a perfect Asian face too !!

    Hi David,

    > Once you have understood the basic meaning, you just have to observe how they are used in natural language.

    That’s a words with deep meaning.深い言葉ですね。
    So, we need to collect a vast amount of data to learn languages.

    > I have a feeling that it was quite a realistic representation of how Japanese police do their jobs

    It is mentioned in the film ;

    “The police and prosecutors make up crime stories, and judges deal with a large number of trials in order to get promoted. And that is why they hate the defendants pleading innocence.”

    It’s very scary.
    Of course, people wouldn’t be sentenced to death for “groping”, but there’s no doubt that they would end up living a hard life after getting released.

    See you!



  23. YU on 2012年06月24日 at 09:30

    Hi amo,

    >We discussed a lot before he return his driver’s license Firstly the car, secondly a tractor and lastly the van.

    > In this sentence, he already returned his license, so I thought “before he return” should be past tense(before he returned)?
    すみません、英語では説明しにくいので、日本語で確認します。
    この文はAnneのコメントにあったと思うのですが、彼女のお父さんは既に免許を返却してるので、過去形にしなくていいのですか?と聞きたかったのです。

    ホント言われてみればそうだけど気づかなかった!
    それともdiscussした時点ではまだ返却してないから現在形でいいのかな?それなら”before he returns”になるのかな?
    時制はいつも悩みの種なので私も解説を知りたいな。

    See you !



  24. YU on 2012年06月24日 at 11:56

    Hi amo,

    I looked it up on David’s book.(A-Z P257 past simple tense)
    I guess your first idea is right. (before he returned)

    I read also P264(past perfect tense).

    What do you think about following sentences??
    I’m not sure about any of them at all, though…

    1.We had discussed a lot before(/when) he returned his driver’s license….

    2.There had been a lot of discussion in my family before(/when) he returened driver’s license…



  25. Anne on 2012年06月24日 at 17:24

    Hi amo ,YU and everyone,

    >We discussed a lot before he return his driver’s license Firstly the car, secondly a tractor and lastly the van.
    —I didn’t reread my comment after posting this time because I was a bit tired. Well…Maybe I was just lazy!
    I think this part should be ” he returned..”,too. Actually, I had no intention this part should be “return(s)” when I wrote this. Anyway, thanks for reading my sentences carefully.

    Hi Fumie and YU,
    >You look younger than you age.
    >You look young for her age.

    Differences between two sentences are interesting!

    By the way, I’m happy if someone said to me,too!

    Hi YU,
    > She gave me another copy of a movie called “告白”. Have you heard of the movie?
    —Yes, I have. I read the novel, but I haven’t watched the movie yet. Mtsu Takao acted as a teacher, and I heard her acting was amazing.
    By the way, have you watched the movie “Shall We dance?” by Suou Masayuki? If not, I highly recommend you. This movie made Tamiyo Kusakari(main character) famous and after that they got married. This movie remade in the US, and basic story is same but the taste of the movie is quite different. I felt the cultural difference between two country in them.

    Bye for now,

    Anne



  26. YU on 2012年06月24日 at 18:13

    Hi Anne,

    Yes, I watched “Shall we dance?”.
    I like the story very much.
    Takenaka Naoto played the very funny character, didn’t he?
    I haven’t watched the US version, but I can hardly believe that American people would understand Japan’s middle-aged salaried workers’ sorrow and grief.

    > Anyway, thanks for reading my sentences carefully.

    As you know, I read your sentences very “carelessly” as usual, but amo has very sharp eyes! Thanks to her, I have a feeling that I used my head a bit after a long time. 🙂



  27. Maki on 2012年06月24日 at 20:17

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    Actually I noticed that I should have used “if” or “whether” instead of “that” after I had posted the comment. I have to write more carefully.

    Bye for now,

    Maki



  28. Fumie on 2012年06月24日 at 22:19

    Hi YU and Anne,

    So you are happy when someone said to you “you look young.” And comments like you are beautiful, pretty,slim … all those compliments make us happy even if we know they are just flattery, don’t we?

    Hi David,

    Thank you for answering my question. I often say to someone 年齢よりお若く見えますね。So those sentences are very useful and I’m sure these remarks make people happy.

    Fumie



  29. YU on 2012年06月25日 at 00:28

    Hi Fumie,

    > all those compliments make us happy even if we know they are just flattery, don’t we?

    Yes, they do.

    私の説明不足みたいなのでもう一回説明していいですか?

    even if we know they are just flattery
    =たとえ御世辞だとわかっていても

    >If it were me, I could not admit that “I look young” even if it was true
    =たとえそれが事実だとしても=たとえ本当に若く見えるとしても

    上の二つは意味が全く違うと思うんです。
    私の英文で言いたかったのは、人にはみんなそれぞれ長所がありますよね?
    例えば色が白い、肌がきれい、字がきれい、とか。
    それが本当のことで、たとえそれを自分で自覚(認識)していたとしても相手の褒め言葉に対して”That’s right(その通りです)”とはなかなか言えないものじゃないですか?って事です。
    だからFumieの英文は褒め言葉と現実は異なるけど(お世辞)、私の英文は褒め言葉イコール事実(現実)なんです。そこの違いです。多分そもそも私の英文自体がヘンなんだと思いますが。

    すみません、きっとどうでもいい事なんですけど誤解されたままだと何だか気になっちゃって。。。

    Good night!



  30. Fumie on 2012年06月25日 at 06:19

    Hi YU,

    Thank you for the detailed explanation. I got it. I might say “thank you.” but not “that’s right.” when someone give me compliment.
    私は褒められたらうれしいけれど、「きれいですね。」とか「お若く見えますね」なんて言われたら、「そうでしょう。」なんて言えませんよ。そうは思わないし、そもそもそんなこともう言われませんし。:<

    Fumie



  31. trmr on 2012年06月25日 at 07:34

    Hi David
    Thank you for your feedback.
    > I think the brake should be to the left of the steering column, and the accelerator to the right.
    –I agree with you. It is less confusing. It is better that the ways to accelerate and to break are completely different like a bicycle. You kick the pedals with your feet to accelerate. You grab the levers with your hands to brake. You never confuse.
    I thought a motorcycle is similar but I was wrong. What a difficult controls!

    Hi YU
    > You mean, “the break is placed next to the acceleration, and it is the cause of driver’s confusion”??
    –Sorry for insufficient sentence. You are right. I wanted to say “設計が悪い”.

    bye for now
    trmr



  32. Tomo on 2012年06月25日 at 08:21

    Hi YU,

    I watched the movie with my husband on DVD, and I had to tell him, “You might want to hold your hands up in the air while you are on the train so that you can avoid false charges”(He commutes to work by train.) It’s scary that the movie is based on a true story!

    I thought I heard an American man say that they call dogs “he” and cats “she” in general(Female dogs are called “she”, and male cats are called “he”) a long time ago, but it might be just my imagination, or it might be because he is an elderly man.

    In English, I don’t feel strange if someone call their pet(like dogs or cats) “s/he”, and it sounds a bit cold to me if they call them “it” because “it” is often used for a thing as in それ. “They” sounds okay to me because it is used for other than things, but this is just my feelings, so maybe I should change the way I feel.

    If you were going to talk about a man in English, you would say “a man” first, and you would change it to “the man”, and then “he.” I wonder how it would change if it was a dog. “A dog”, “the dog”, and “it”? For example:

    I had a big brown dog(male) when I was a child. The dog was not purebred, but it was very smart. I loved it.

    Hmmm, if I was the speaker, I would say, “He was very smart.” and “I loved him/the dog.”

    >…not because of your qualification but because of your character and “BEAUTY” !!

    Of course I meant “I think you would have been a very popular teacher EVEN if there had been more Japanese students, not because of your qualification but because of your character and BEAUTY”! It seems like I forgot to put important words. Forgive me!

    > I guess it won’t be long before my son teaches Japanese language to his father.

    Your husband is very lucky to have two lovely teachers!

    Hi Anne,

    An Alaska cruise?! That sounds lovely!! The scenery must have been breathtaking. And thanks for reminding me of the name of the book. Yes, it was “日本人の知らない日本語.” I might read one of them. Anyway, take care of yourself!

    Hi Jyoji,

    Thanks for your message! I’m glad that I didn’t offend you.

    >If you found my mistake , you point out frankly!

    OK, I will. …So, can I do it now? I think you said, “If you found…” because we say “もし~したら”(the past form) in Japanese, but in English, they use the present form in this case, so I think it should be “If you find mistakes…” Actually, this is explained in the book “A-Z”(one of David’s books).

    I had a look at the site. I see, you wanted to say “とんでもない.” I think that’s very difficult to translate. As for online dictionaries, I highly recommend 英辞郎 on ALC. It has plenty of example sentences and translations, and you can use it both as an English-Japanese and a Japanese-English dictionary. I usually check 英辞郎 when I’m not sure about something, and then I Google it to see how many people use the expression or how it is used.

    Hi everyone,
    How was your weekend? I went to Yamanashi with my family on Saturday. There was an event called “Firefly Festival”, and we saw a lot of fireflies. It was fantastic!

    As for amo’s question, I also think it should be “before he returned..” because Anne was talking about the past.

    Have a nice day!

    Tomo

    PS YU – Thanks for your kind message!(I read your comment to Jyoji.) I consider myself one of David’s students 😉



  33. YU on 2012年06月25日 at 10:14

    Hi Fumie,

    No one tells me “きれい” any more too, but only my son sometimes tells me, “ママ、かわいいよ”.
    I know I’m not かわいい at all, but it cheers me up in an instant!! 🙂

    Hi trmr,

    I actually thought you meant “設計が悪い”, but I was not sure about it.

    Hi Tomo,

    You went to Yamanashi to see fireflies?
    That sounds nice!!
    I hate insects, but I like to see fireflies in the night.

    > In English, I don’t feel strange if someone call their pet(like dogs or cats) “s/he”, and it sounds a bit cold to me if they call them “it” because “it” is often used for a thing as in それ.

    Hmmm…You’re right.
    And I have a feeling that “it” is used for a baby too. Is it just my imagination??

    >I wonder how it would change if it was a dog. “A dog”, “the dog”, and “it”? For example:
    >I had a big brown dog(male) when I was a child. The dog was not purebred, but it was very smart. I loved it

    I guess the third one and the fourth one(maybe the second one too) would change “he”, because the speaker must know the dog was a male dog.
    In my understanding, “it” is used only when you’re not sure about the sex.

    BTW, you must have heard of the idiom “It’s raining (like) cats and dogs.”(土砂降り)
    Yesterday I received an email from a friend from English language club. She wanted to know the origin of the idiom and looked it up on the Internet, but she just found out that there were various theories, but none of them was probable.
    Did you learn the origin when you learned this idiom at school?
    I found an article about the origin. This is a very seasonable topic, isn’t it? If you are interested, please have a look! 🙂

    http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/raining%20cats%20and%20dogs.html

    See you !



  34. YU on 2012年06月25日 at 10:31

    > the speaker must know the dog was a male dog.

    the speaker must have known the dog was ….



  35. Tomo on 2012年06月25日 at 12:09

    Hi YU,

    I hate bugs too, but fireflies were beautiful in the dark. A firefly landed on my husband’s shoulder. My children were very excited and watched it walk on my husband’s shirt, but I stepped back a little…(笑)

    Thanks for the interesting link. Some parts were too difficult for me to understand, but I read it through. I didn’t learn the idiom “cats and dogs” at school, but I remember that I was very surprised when I learned the expression for the first time. I heard that it comes from the sound of the heavy rain; it sounds as if cats and dogs were fighting. I didn’t know there are so many different theories!

    Speak to you soon,

    Tomo



  36. Tomo on 2012年06月25日 at 12:18

    Hi again YU,

    I forgot to write this.

    >And I have a feeling that “it” is used for a baby too. Is it just my imagination??

    I guess “it” can be used for a baby too, but I would use “she” if I’m not sure about the sex, because I think it’s safer than mistaking a girl for a boy.



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