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Thank you for your contributions to a very lively discussion, and thank you YU for posing an interesting question that made everyone think.

From your comments, it seems that there is a kind of culture of forgiving people for bad behaviour when they are drunk in Japan, especially in relation to “office parties.” I think that attitudes are gradually changing, but it seems to me that Japanese people still drink much more than they should. I asked a class of students the other day how many of their fathers drank every night after they came home from work. Practically all of them raised their hands. I’m not sure what the safe limits for alcohol are, but I know that you definitely should not drink every day.

Here is some feedback on your comments.

I think people are 100% responsible for their actions whether they are drunk or not.
Nice sentence.

This is really disgusting and I don’t think the excuse is accepted at all!
… and I don’t think this excuse should be accepted at all.

Apparently, “being drunk” is divided into 3 types(単純、複雑、病的酩酊) in the Japanese justice system
Nice sentence. You could also say, “Under Japanese law, being ‘drunk’ is…”

Of course,, this kind of behavior should not be allowed whether it’s a crime or not,…
A good word to use here would be ‘tolerated’ – “This kind of behaviour should not be tolerated…”

By the way, when I think about these being-drunk-crimes(I’m not sure about this expression),
Maybe “alcohol-related crimes”?

We should control ourself.
We should control ourselves.

If you still believe it and do something stupid like sexual harrasment, you are just an outdated, foolish person.
I’m afraid there are still a lot of those around!

Don’t they really remember anything?
Do they really not remember anything?

Please don’t ask me because I don’t drink much.
You could also say, “I can’t help you there because…”

In fact, I have a very low tolerance of alcohol. When
In fact, I get drunk very easily. / I can’t drink very much. (A-Z: alcohol)

I’ve finally realized that not being able to handle my alcohol tolerance was heredity.
… was hereditary.

If it offended you, I’m sorry.
It didn’t offend me! Thanks for sharing your story.

Kimi, thanks for sharing your stories! Why should we hate you???
Why would we hate you???

Once her dad came home drank, he peed after he opened the door of the closet.
I heard a worse story than that. One of my friend’s told me that her husband had opened a drawer and was squatting over it! I’ll leave the rest to your imagination!

Does people sleep with someone unconsciously when they are drunk?
I’m sure most of you know this, but just in case some of you don’t, “sleep with” is a euphemism for “have sex with.”

Given that this is true, we certainly should change our English education, but I don’t know if it’s a matter of “starting time” or “quality of English education”.
It’s actually a matter of three big problems:
1. Far too many students in a class.
2. Nowhere near enough hours of study.
3. A focus on strange and unnatural English for the purposes for entrance exams.
Starting the students earlier will not make a difference, I’m afraid.

Which is better?
1. He was dead drunk.
2. He was sober.
Which would be better?

You know what, every time I tell my family name(it’s one of typical Okinawan names) or where I am from, most of the people say to me “You must be a big drinker” or “You like drinking.”
I get the same thing being from Wales!

…to excuse for their bad behavior.
…to excuse their bad behavior.

I think Japanese people get drunk and become violent, too.
Not on the scale that British people do, I can assure you! Or not in public, at any rate.

I found afresh there are many incidents caused by alcohol in Japan…
It opened my eyes to how many incidents are caused by alcohol in Japan…./ It made me realise how many incidents….

You’re a really hard worker Kimi. I think your name should be published on the “practice test” as the supervising editor!
I agree! Thanks for all your help. I really appreciate it.

By the way, does “You speak for yourself!” mean「勝手に言ってろ」?
It means “That is just your opinion! I don’t agree.”

…but my husband drinks everyday.
…but my husband drinks every day. (A-Z: everyday)

Well, let me share one story what happened to me.
Let me share one story about something that happened to me.

1.Some students tend to think studying abroad is an end in itself, not a means to an end. Students should not be satisfied with that.
Nice sentence.

2.He wanted to start a business, so living on one thousand yen a day was a means to an end. He didn’t feel unhappy about bearing enough to live on.
The first sentence is okay. The second should be “Living on such a tight budget didn’t bother him.”

1. We asked a constructor to give us a ballpark figure for how much it would cost to renovate our kitchen and bathroom.(
Nice example.

I think it doesn’t differ so much from the way you do!
Really? I think it is far less common for people to invite their friends to their houses in Japan. This is one of the things I miss about Britain.

Men often can sleep with women who are not his type at all when they are really drunk. Don’t you think so?
I don’t want to upset any wives, but I’m afraid that is true whether we are drunk or not!

Have a great weekend, and see you again with a new topic on Monday.

32 Comments

  1. Anne on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 11:13 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    >A good word to use here would be ‘tolerated’ – “This kind of behaviour should not be tolerated…”
    —I see. I had no idea of using “tolerated” here. Thank you.
    >but my husband drinks every day. (A-Z: everyday)
    —Yes, I know! I can’t explain the difference between the two without opening your book, but still I made the mistake! Ah…sigh…

    Thank you for checking my sentences taht I wrote using phrases in Twitter. To tell the truth, these two felt difficult to use, and I was not sure if I got them right or not.

    By the way, when I saw the phrase “split up”, I knew the new and understood it as “解散する.” If I saw this first, I might thought it as “わかれる.” Is “split up” used in this meaning? And then, if so, what is the difference between “split up” and “break up”?

    Hi YU,
    >I wonder if your boss had been interested in you since long!!
    —No way! I happened to take my seat next to her…

    Hi Kattie,
    >How do you generally socialise with friends in Japan? —Biwa explained the way nicely, and I agree with her. Aside from that, in Japan, I guess there are less opportunities enjoying parties or drinking as a couple compared with your country, so people often drink with their coworkers after work.
    It is often said that housewives have lunch at resturantswith their friends while their husbands are patient with reasonable lunch.
    By the way, my place, Nagoya is famous for it number of the coffe shop. It’s because Nagoyan socialize with his or her friends or neighbors at a coffee shop instead of inviting his/her house.

    Have a lovely weekend,

    Anne



  2. Anne on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 11:35 PM

    it’s me again.
    correction:
    >Nagoya is famous for it number of the coffe shop
    —Nagoya is famous for its number of the coffe shop



  3. Biwa on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 12:24 AM

    Hi David,

    Thanks always for your feedback. I’m always amazed that you have never failed to do this every week for more than six years! You must be a hardworker, too!

    >I don’t want to upset any wives, but I’m afraid that is true whether we are drunk or not!

    Is that true?? Even if she is not your type at all? I don’t think I can ever do that!

    >Really? I think it is far less common for people to invite their friends to their houses in Japan. This is one of the things I miss about Britain.

    Maybe you’re right. I think my parents had parties almost every weekend when we lived in America and those things might have affected me. In Japan, many people tend to think/say their houses are not tidy or big enough to invite people. However, I think young people like students or single men/women invite friends because they don’t have so much money. Also, women like me are used to inviting each other since our children were really small and we still do that. One of my friend’s husband likes fishing and he also is a very good cook! So I think some people do invite friends to their houses, but it’s rare to introduce someone new to a party. I guess that’s a big difference between what my parents were doing and so from what I guess you do in Britain.



  4. YU on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 12:56 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback!

    >If you still believe it and do something stupid like sexual harrasment, you are just an outdated, foolish person.
    -I’m afraid there are still a lot of those around!

    You’re right, but you must always be careful not to overdo! Everybody is actually observing what you say or do even if they say “今夜は無礼講”. Moreover, you could be “a criminal” anytime because Japanese laws have been changed a lot and became more “victim-friendly” in the last 20 years or so.

    >Please don’t ask me because I don’t drink much.
    – You could also say, “I can’t help you there because…”

    I see.
    I couldn’t think of using “there” here myself!

    > 3. A focus on strange and unnatural English for the purposes for entrance exams.

    I agree, but that makes my ears burn!
    I think I’m helping my students to learn those strange and unnatural English – 受験英語 on my job!!

    Hi Anne,

    —No way! I happened to take my seat next to her…

    Oh, I see.
    Maybe when she drinks, she starts kissing everybody(キス魔)?! It reminds me a bit of 和田アキ子!
    By the way, I really didn’t like to being hugged and kissed whenever I saw my friends in Germany.
    I know it’s just their way of greetings, but it was really uncomfortable….

    > It’s because Nagoyan socialize with his or her friends or neighbors at a coffee shop instead of inviting his/her house.

    That’s a lovely culture! Lucky you!!
    I love coffee and coffee shops.
    I think I can melt into Nagoyan society vey soon!!

    As David pointed out, I don’t really like to invite my friends to my house. My friends always say to me, “お構いなく”, but how could I do nothing for my guests, although “I” invited them to MY house?!, so I prefer seeing my friends outside to inviting them to my house.

    Have a great weekend, all!

    See you!



  5. Fumie on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 06:31 AM

    Hi David,

    Thnak you for your feedback. As you said, the discussion became more lively because of YU’s interesting question. I really enjoyed reading everyone’s answers to that.
    >I don’t want to upset any wives, but I’m afraid that is true whether we are drunk or not!
    Oh, that’s an instinct of men. I thnik most women are not. (women don’t sleep with someone who is not her type when they are drunk or sober.)

    Hi everyone,
    It’s already December. Time flies!
    The weather is forecast to be very cold, bundle up when you go out!

    Fumie



  6. amo on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 11:27 AM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback 🙂
    >I get the same thing being from Wales!
    I am sure you do! I know you don’t drink, so those words annoy you?

    >Men often can sleep with women who are not his type at all when they are really drunk. Don’t you think so?
    -
I don’t want to upset any wives, but I’m afraid that is true whether we are drunk or not!

    I think some women can sleep with men who are not their type, especially after drinking.
    Because I don’t think every woman always drinks with her type. If so, women always intend to sleep with men who drink with??
    もし男性だけが誰とでも寝れるというなら、酔った勢いで寝た相手の女性はその気があったということですか?
    A friend told me that she slept with a man and wished erase that memory from her mind the very next day.

    Hi Anne and YU,

    >Maybe when she drinks, she starts kissing everybody(キス魔)?!

    This reminded me of an ex-coworker of one of my sisters. She told me about her(ex-coworker.) When she drank, she started kissing anybody. My sister saw her kissing completely stranger(guy) once at a Izakaya.

    Bye for now,
    amo



  7. Kimi on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 11:57 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    >In fact, I get drunk very easily. / I can’t drink very much.
    I think I tend to use technical words. As Tomo mentioned before, the key to expressing your thoughts in English is KISS! (Keep it short and simple.) I will keep it in my mind.

    >You’re a really hard worker Kimi. I think your name should be published on the “practice test” as the supervising editor!
    >I agree! Thanks for all your help. I really appreciate it.
    It is nice of you, David and Biwa, to say that. I am not good at grammar, so I make a point of training with the test preferably every day. That’s way I would easily notice mistakes. I myself appreciate the test David made.

    Hi Anne,

    I’ve heard a toast with butter and red bean paste is common in Nagoya. I want to try it in a café some day!

    Have a great weekend, everyone!

    Kimi



  8. Biwa on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 01:02 PM

    Hi amo,

    >A friend told me that she slept with a man and wished erase that memory from her mind the very next day.

    Perhaps, some people need to pay such a heavy price to learn things!

    Hi YU and everyone,

    I wonder if people in other countries say「お構いなく」(Please, don’t bother) when they are served something at other people’s houses. I understand that the phrase makes you a bit uncomfortable or formal. I like my friends to come into my kitchen and help prepare drinks/food while chatting, and vice versa when I am invited to their houses.

    I’ve been thinking about inviting friends to your houses after reading David’s comment. Is it such a rare thing to have people/guests in your houses? I think their are various ways besides having drinks or dinner. For example, having friends for tea, having lunch with mom-friends, baby-sitting your friend’s children, having your children’s friends for a sleep-over or whatever. If you have time, I’d love to hear your thoughts.



  9. YU on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 04:20 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    I think some like to invite your friends to your houses like you, but some don’t really like that like me. It’s just a matter of preference, but as David says, it’s true that it’s NOT VERY COMMON to invite your friends to your houses in Japan. I guess that has lot to do with our character.

    Of course, I sometimes invite my friends to my house, too, but it’s not very often. In addition to that, my son seems to like playing with his friends somewhere other than his house. Maybe it’s because for him his house is a very usual place and boring!

    > I like my friends to come into my kitchen and help prepare drinks/food while chatting, and vice versa when I am invited to their houses.

    It’s funny you should mention that!
    One of my mom-friends talked exactly about that last week.
    She told me that her friend entered her kitchen and opened the fridge to put drinks away without her permission. My friend was upset and felt uncomfortable with that.

    I’ve been surprised at seeing my friend doing the dishes in my kitchen when I returned from the toilet. I know she was just kind, but I don’t like someone entering my kitchen very much.
    I don’t know why I don’t like it, but it might be because I’m kind of 潔癖症…

    You teach English at home, don’t you?
    I guess you are so much used to inviting people to your house, but I’m not. You’re probably a very social person, that’s why you can teach English to lots of children face to face!

    > For example, having friends for tea, having lunch with mom-friends,

    I “occasionally” do that, too, but I become always exhausted after my friens(and their kids) left… So, I prefer having tea or lunch with mom-friends at restaurants. It makes me refresh. Recent restaurants often have “kids playing space” and kids lunch menus.

    > baby-sitting your friend’s children, having your children’s friends for a sleep-over or whatever. If you have time, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

    We’ve discussed “babysitting” on this blog before. At the time, we reached a conclusion that in Japan more and more parents tend to avoid looking after someone else’s children today and asking their friends to care of theirs. I’ve never asked my friends to look after my son, and vice versa.
    My son has never had a sleepover at his friend’s house yet. Come to think of it, people almost never talk about that around me. Is this also a new childrearing trend?!

    Hi Fumie,

    > I thnik most women are not. (women don’t sleep with someone who is not her type when they are drunk or sober.)

    I think there are a lot of “loose women”(尻軽女) around!

    Hi Anne,

    Did you open the first door(?) of your Advent calender? My son opend it this morning and ate the chocolate in it!

    Hi Kimi,

    > I think I tend to use technical words. As Tomo mentioned before, the key to expressing your thoughts in English is KISS! (Keep it short and simple.) I will keep it in my mind

    It might sound arrogant, but I think your English already sounds much more natural than before(when you joined here). I guess everyone here feel the same.
    私がこういうこと言うのもおこがましいですが、Kimiの英語、このブログに初めてコメントした時より既にかなりナチュラルになっていると思います。多分メンバーみんなそう思っていると思いますよ。

    Hi amo,

    > When she drank, she started kissing anybody. My sister saw her kissing completely stranger(guy) once at a Izakaya.

    If I were a man, I’d never like to be her boyfriend or husband! However, some dirty old men at the Izakaya would have been pleased with the unexpected fortune!
    (彼女が若くて綺麗な子だったら、ですが!)



  10. Biwa on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 10:28 PM

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for sharing your opinions. It’s always nice and interesting to hear different ways of thinking. Talking about entering someone else’s kitchen(or whatever else!), I certainly think that you first need to ask if you could do so. Preparing things or doing the dishes with friends was just a natural thing for us, because we can talk and talk that way! 私たちの場合、ひたすらしゃべり続けたいばかりに、自然とお互いに台所も手伝うようになってしまった、という感じです。もちろん、「手伝おうか?」ってまず聞きますけどね!
    Those things are like little tips to get along well with each other, I guess.
    I’ve also read the older entries about “baby-sitting” you mentioned. For me, I think I would have never been able to raise my sons without my friend’s help. For example, little children often catch flus or get hurt (especially boys!) so I had to run to the hospital quite oftenly. As you know, few hospitals in Japan have appointment systems so it takes time and it was quite troublesome to take both of them to the hospital. I asked my friends to baby-sit my other son at those times and my friends did so, too. That was really great help to me.

    Also, baby-sitting other children or having them for a sleep-over was fun not only for the children but also for me! It’s nice to see how children get along with friends of different ages and I can’t forget how fun it was to shampoo five boys standing in a row in our bathtub! Now they’re teenagers so I don’t shampoo them (of course!), but when my elder son’s friends from his volleyball team came over this summer, I boiled nearly thirty bundles of noodles(お素麺30束)!!
    I understand those things are just a matter of preference, but I just happen to love doing those things and so do my friends! 類は友を呼ぶのか、ただの物好きが集まったのかも知れませんね・・・笑。



  11. Biwa on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 10:32 PM

    Hi David,

    Is “rub off on me” a positive expression?



  12. Yukako on Saturday December 1st, 2012 at 10:37 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback, but I don’t understand the difference between “Don’t they really remember anything?” and “Do they really not remember anything?”
    Is the latter more natural?



  13. amo on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 12:57 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    >Perhaps, some people need to pay such a heavy price to learn things!

    You are right. I am sure she learnt something. Anyway, she got married last year and her husband is a really nice person.

    >If you have time, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

    It is very natural for you to invite people to your house because of your family background, like you said. I am not social person, so I hardly invite people. Maybe because I would prefer to keep my private life secret.

    Hi YU,

    I thought that “Men often can sleep with …” implied that women hardly do that like Fumie said. But you said to Fumie, “There are a lot of “loose women” around.” That made my understanding was wrong, did I?
    男性と限定していたので女性は違うと言いたかったのかと思ってました。でもFumieに対するコメントを読んだら、逆のこと言ってるので、びっくりしました。もしかして女性にとっては当然のことと言いたかったのですか???なら思いっきり、勘違いしてました。

    >(彼女が若くて綺麗な子だったら、ですが!)

    As far as I can remember, she was a pretty woman. My sister showed me her picture once.



  14. YU on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 08:17 AM

    Hi amo,

    >もしかして女性にとっては当然のことと言いたかったのですか???なら思いっきり、勘違いしてました。

    I didn’t mean 「女性にとっては当然のこと」, but as you suspect, I meant “Not only men can sleep with women who are not his type at all when they are drunk, but also some women can do the same. Of course, the percentage is lower in women’s case, though, as Fumie mentioned….
    もちろん「女性にとっては当然のこと」と言いたかったのではありません。でも酔った時に全然タイプじゃない人と寝れるのは男性に限らないと思ったのです。(男女ともやらないと”成立”しないと思ったので。もちろん”それが職業の女性がいる場所”へ行く男性もいるでしょうが)もちろん女性の場合はずっとパーセンテージは低いと思いますよ。

    I think that has a lot to do with the differences of the sexual instincts between men and women. Men’s instinct is to spread(?) their genes as much as possible, and women’s is to choose the best(good) genes among all the offers from men because the period and number of times of their pregnancy is limited.
    (女性のパーセンテージが低いのは)男女の性本能の違いと大いに関係があるのだと思います。男性は出来るだけたくさん自分の遺伝子を残そうとし、女性は出産時期と回数に限界があるからより良い遺伝子を多くの男性のオファーの中から選ぼうとする。(私の場合は「多くのオファー」なんてなかったけど!LOL!)

    – “There are a lot of “loose women” around.”

    Actually, I just copied David’s phrase in his feedback. I understood that “There are a lot of ~around.” means 「~はよく(いっぱい)いる」, so I just meant 「軽い女はよく(いっぱい)いる」with the sentence above.
    実を言うと今回のフィードバックの中のDavidの表現をそのままコピーしただけです。”There are a lot of ~ around.” は 単に”~はよく(いっぱい)いる”という意味だと理解したので「この世の中、軽い女はよく(いっぱい)いる」という意味で使いました。間違ってるかも。

    Hi Biwa,

    > もちろん、「手伝おうか?」ってまず聞きますけどね!

    Yes, when I visit my friends at their houses, I usually ask my friends so first, too.
    However, in my case I usually decline the offers from my friends with thanks. As I mentioned, I don’t like someone else entering my kitchen very much. The kitchen is something special for me.
    私も友達の家にお呼ばれしたときはいつもそういう風にまず聞きます。でも自分が友達に聞かれた場合はいつも「大丈夫だよ!」と言ってやんわり断っています。前のコメントにも書きましたがキッチンに家族以外が入るのはどうも抵抗があって。キッチンは家の中でも結構特別な場所かも。

    > I asked my friends to baby-sit my other son at those times and my friends did so, too. That was really great help to me.

    I think so!
    In my case, that has never happened to me because my son is an only child.
    そうだと思いますよ。ただうちの息子は一人っ子だからそういう状況に陥った経験がないんですか。。。

    > I understand those things are just a matter of preference, but I just happen to love doing those things and so do my friends! 類は友を呼ぶのか、ただの物好きが集まったのかも知れませんね・・・笑。

    I don’t think you and your friends are もの好き(!), but a lively atmosphere is not really my line. I’m not 根暗, but people around me often say, “You talk a lot, but you’re a quiet person”. Very contradictive, though!!
    Biwaとお友達がもの好きとは全然思いません!ただ私はすごく賑やかな雰囲気はあまり得意じゃないんですよ。根暗、というわけではないですが、周りの人達からは「よくしゃべるけど物静かだね」とよく言われます。すごい矛盾してるけど!

    See you!



  15. Biwa on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 11:28 AM

    Hi YU,

    >I’m not 根暗, but people around me often say, “You talk a lot, but you’re a quiet person”. Very contradictive, though!!

    I understand that. I like talking with people but I also like being alone and think about things, too. Everyone has both sides, I guess. By the way, “not in my line” was new to me. I looked up in the dictionary and says “line=得意分野、専門分野”. I think you need “in” before “my line”. Thanks anyway!

    Hi amo,

    I’m glad to hear your friend got married!

    >Maybe because I would prefer to keep my private life secret.

    Yes, I think that’s quite important. I like being with friends, but I don’t like people who pries into other people’s affairs too much. I just quietly get away from those people!



  16. amo on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 01:47 PM

    Hi YU,

    >I meant “Not only men can sleep with women who are not his type at all when they are drunk, but also some women can do the same.

    I think so too, that’s why I wrote “I think some women can sleep with men who are not their type, especially after drinking…..”

    Don’t get me wrong but I don’t take both sentences(“Men often can sleep…” and “Not only me can sleep…”) are in the same way. I wish you had written this sentence at the first place, so that I wouldn’t have taken your thoughts wrongly. Maybe I was the only one who took your words wrongly though (lol) Anyway, thanks for answering my question.

    Hi Biwa,

    Thanks 🙂

    >but I don’t like people who pries into other people’s affairs too much.

    Me, neither!! I am certainly not a nosy person but people around me sometimes tell me their stories. I guess that I am a really good listener.

    amo



  17. Anne on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 04:38 PM

    Hi YU,

    >Did you open the first door(?) of your Advent calender?—Yes, I did:) It must be thrilled with opening the door and finding sweets every day for your son. Mine is more simple,though…

    Hi Kimi,
    >I’ve heard a toast with butter and red bean paste is common in Nagoya—Yes, it’s called “小倉トースト”and as a “あんこ(sweet beans)lover, I even eat this for breakfast at home once in a while. The point is thickly sliced and toasted bread with butter and あんこ。

    Hi amo and YU,
    >>Maybe when she drinks, she starts kissing everybody(キス魔)?!—kind of… When she was drunk, she touched and squeezed someone beside her.

    Anne



  18. Anne on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 04:59 PM

    it’s me again.
    It’s really cold in here today,isn’t it?
    I guess it’s not just me. How about the weather like in your place?
    I put on a bit thicker cardigan this morning.

    By the way, I’m wondering how you say “ヒートテック下着.” Is it a warm underwear? Is it OK to say “heattech” like “Kleenex”?
    (I tried to write sentence using sentence from David’s twitter:)



  19. Anne on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 05:01 PM

    sorry, I made a mistake!
    “It’s really cold in here today,isn’t it?” should be “It’s really cold today, isn’t it?” or “It’s really cold in here today.” My original sentence doesn’t make sense.



  20. Anne on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 05:15 PM

    I’m sorry for appearing again!
    “bit” can’t go together with a noun.
    >a bit thicker cardigan—a thicker cardigan than usual
    Does this correction make sense?



  21. David Barker on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 05:31 PM

    Hi Anne

    It’s called ‘thermal underwear.’

    I think the other phrase you are looking for is ‘a slightly thicker cardigan.’
    Actually, I might tweet that.



  22. Kimi on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 08:36 PM

    Hi YU,

    >It might sound arrogant, but I think your English already sounds much more natural than before(when you joined here).
    Thank you for saying that. If it is true, it can be thanks to this blog. I can learn a lot from YU’s comments.

    Hi Anne,

    Sounds delicious! Imaging that makes me hungry.

    Hi Biwa,

    >I think you need “in” before “my line”.
    I found these sentences “Swimming is my line”(泳ぎならお手のものです) and “Singing is not much in my line”(歌はあまり得意じゃない) in 英辞郎. I wonder if you can say in the both way.

    Kimi



  23. Biwa on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 09:35 PM

    Hi Kimi,

    Thanks! but I’m not sure either. I wonder if someone knows.
    By the way, I found another meaning for “line”. “That’s my line!”=「それはこっちのセリフよ!」

    Hi Anne,

    Yes, it’s getting cold around here, too. I can’t survive the winter (I’m not sure about this expression, either) without those thermal underwears!



  24. YU on Sunday December 2nd, 2012 at 11:43 PM

    Hi Biwa and Kimi,

    I’m not sure about the usages of “my line” either.
    I just meant 「賑やかな雰囲気はあまり得意じゃない」 with my sentence.
    You can see lots of examples of “my line” here ;

    http://ejje.weblio.jp/sentence/content/my+line

    You can see only 3 examples below mentioned where “my line” is used without “in” and “in” is used in all the other examples. So, I guess “in my line” is right or at least more commonly used than “my line” alone, as Biwa pointed out.
    私もweb辞書を参考に書いただけなのでよく分かりません。でもたくさん例がある中でinなしでmy lineを使っている例文はたった3つしかないのでBiwaが言うようにinをつけるのが正しいか、あるいは少なくともinを付ける方が一般的なんだと思います。

    1. Modern jazz is not my line.
    モダンジャズは私の得意じゃない。 – Tanaka Corpus

    2. That is not my line.
    それは私の得意ではない。 – Tanaka Corpus

    3. That kind of work is not (in) my line.
    そういう仕事は私の本領ではない. – 研究社 新和英中辞典

    Hi amo,

    > Don’t get me wrong but I don’t take both sentences(“Men often can sleep…” and “Not only me can sleep…”) are in the same way. I wish you had written this sentence at the first place, so that I wouldn’t have taken your thoughts wrongly

    I won’t take you wrong, don’t worry!
    I think I should have written so in the first place, too.
    Fumie wrote “(women don’t sleep with someone who is not her type when they are drunk or sober.)”, so, I just wanted to to say 「そんなことないよ!」.
    Perhaps I expected too much that everyone could read what I meant from the content, sorry!
    私もamoに指摘されて最初から誤解のないように書くべきだった、と思いました。Fumieのコメントに対して書いた文だったので文脈からみんな分かってくれるだろう、と期待しすぎたみたいです。ゴメンネ!

    Hi Anne,

    Yes, it was very cold today!

    By the way, I have quite many heattech clothes at home. I wonder half of Japanese people have one heattech item at least. Heattech is loved by men and women of all ages in Japan.
    Today I went to UNIQLO to buy some thick heattech tights(thicker than 110 denier at least), but I gave up on buying them finally because they didn’t have thick ones in my size. They have a variety of fashionable thick tights in size M/L, but it is too short for me! I hope they will make thick heattech tights in L/XL size next year!

    Keep yourself warm and don’t catch a cold, everyone!

    Good night!!



  25. YU on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 12:18 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    I forgot to mention this.

    > I understand that. I like talking with people but I also like being alone and think about things, too. Everyone has both sides, I guess.

    I know exactly what you mean, but what my friends say to me is 「あなた(私)はしゃべっていても静か(な雰囲気)」. I think it’s because of my ways of talking(voice tone) and my character. I don’t think they know how I am when I’m alone because they’ve never seen me being alone! I think again my sentence was unclear so you took it wrong.
    Sorry!
    Biwaの言っていることはよく分かるんですが、私の友達が私に言っているのは「しゃべっていても静かだね」ということです。多分話し方(声のトーンかも)や性格も関係しているかもしれません。私の友達は私がひとりでいるところを見たことないと思うので私が一人の時どんな感じか知らないと思います。
    私の元の英文が変だったからまたまた誤解を招いてしまいました。すみません。



  26. Biwa on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 07:37 AM

    Hi YU,

    >I think it’s because of my ways of talking(voice tone) and my character.

    Thanks, I think your sentence was clear, but I just wrote back like that because I don’t know how you really talk! YUの文章はちゃんと通じてます、大丈夫♪ただ、実際にどんな話し方をするのか分からないので(当たり前だけど!)あんな風に返信しました。私の文章の方に問題がありましたね、こちらこそすみません。

    >They have a variety of fashionable thick tights in size M/L, but it is too short for me!

    I often imagine how all the members here are like. How tall are you, YU? I’m starting to imagine you like a very cool and intellectual person, of course in a very positive way! ここのみんながどんな感じの人なのか、よく想像します。上の二つの文章から、YUはとても理知的でかっこいい雰囲気なんだろうな、と勝手に想像してます♪



  27. Anne on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 08:07 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your help.
    *a slightly thicker cardigan–I got it. I saw your tweet:)

    *thermal underwear—I see.
    I’m sure I have lots of opportunities to use this words(phrase?) in winter!

    Hi Biwa and YU,

    >They have a variety of fashionable thick tights in size M/L, but it is too short for me! I hope they will make thick heat tech tights in L/XL size next year!—Oh that’s too bad!
    Biwa,I can’t survive the winter without these comfortable underwear,either!

    By the way, don’t you think UNIQLO have a variety of thermal colorful underwears at a reasonable price?

    See you soon,

    Anne



  28. Biwa on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 08:59 AM

    Hi Kimi and YU,

    Talking about “my line”, if “That’s my line!” means 「それはこっちのセリフよ!」, I wonder if the one YU mentioned has two meanings.

    >2. That is not my line.
    それは私の得意ではない。 – Tanaka Corpus

    Do you think this sentence can also be used like 「それは私のセリフ(言うこと)じゃないわ!」? Or is this “line” used for only positive sentences?



  29. YU on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 10:40 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    > How tall are you, YU?

    I’m not amazingly tall, but I think I’m relatively tall in my generation.
    1.66-67cm tall. This is a very delicate(微妙な)height in Japan because Japanese women’s M/L size is usually for women up to 1.65cm. I can wear some of the clothes in size M/L, too, but the length (sleeve and collar to bottom hem)is often a bit too short.

    > I’m starting to imagine you like a very cool and intellectual person, of course in a very positive way!

    Thank you for your positive imagination!
    I don’t want to disappoint you, but I’m not 理知的 or かっこいい雰囲気 at all…I’m just a アラフォーのおばちゃん.
    As for my voice tone, I always wanted to have a sweet voice when I was young. In Japan, popular women often have a cute voice. They also act all cute and charged up(キャピキャピする). I’m always a hard-boiled(?)woman and I’ve never been polular with men in my life so far. Or are there any onther problems with me?!

    > I often imagine how all the members here are like.

    Actually, I’ve talked about that with Tomo, Fumie, Anne, and amo before. I imagine you’re very social, active and smart.(社交的、積極的で頭のいい女性)

    > Do you think this sentence can also be used like 「それは私のセリフ(言うこと)じゃないわ!」? Or is this “line” used for only positive sentences?

    As you see in the examples of the web dictionary I posted, this “line” is used both in positive and negative sentences. You see most of the examples are “is out of my line/is not in my line”, don’t you?

    > Talking about “my line”, if “That’s my line!” means 「それはこっちのセリフよ!」, I wonder if the one YU mentioned has two meanings.

    It seems that the word “line” has really a lot of meanings, so we have no choice but to read from the context each time, I think.

    Hi Anne,

    > By the way, don’t you think UNIQLO have a variety of thermal colorful underwears at a reasonable price?

    Indeed! I always buy some of their new line up every year.
    Come to think of it, all my family members were dressed in Heattech room wear when I was writing my comments last night!



  30. YU on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 10:59 AM

    Hi David,

    > What’s the word I’m looking for?

    I’m wondering in what kind of situations this phrase is used…
    I doubt that it should be translated literally.

    Perhaps is it used “when you actually know the word, but you can’t recall what it is”?



  31. Biwa on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 11:42 AM

    Hi YU,

    I wish I were you! I’m only 160 and I often wear high-heeled shoes or boots to make myself look taller. My younger sister is almost the same height as you, and says the same thing when she goes shopping. She says she likes Gap better because they have more variety in sizes.
    I’m also a アラフォーのおばちゃんhere! I found out recently that I’m 同級生with David. I’m not sure if I’m like what you’re imagining because as I’ve said before, I have both sides. I think I’m not that active. I also hate to talk in front of people! (Then, why am I a teacher??? Big mystery!)

    As for the “line” thing, I wanted to say like this:”That’s my line.”のように “line”を使う場合は、肯定文としてのみ成り立つのかな、と思いました。何故なら、否定文の ”That’s not my line.” の解釈が2通りになってしまうからです。(「それは苦手です。」と「それは私のセリフじゃないわ。」)同じ文で、2通りの解釈があるのは不自然かな、と思うのですが、どうでしょう。



  32. David Barker on Monday December 3rd, 2012 at 01:21 PM

    Hi YU,

    Use it instead of “How can I say?” which is what most Japanese people say when they can’t remember or think of a word. This is both incorrect and unnatural.

    I wouldn’t worry too much about “line.” It’s not that important, and as someone said, it can be used in many different ways depending on the context.