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We set a new record this week – 79 comments! In some ways, that is a great thing, but I wonder whether it might put some people off reading because there are just too many of them. Anyway, that will be our topic for next week.

Here is some feedback on your comments.

Okay, but I found the expression “eat lunch out” in the Internet, too. I don’t think you are wrong.
I’m not sure about this. It sounds a bit weird to me. Someone might say it in conversation, but it’s not really standard English. Just “eat out” is fine, though.

My favourite part of the movie is the scene where
Scarlett, the heroine of the movie, knows she lost parents, home, everything
I think this should be “finds out that….” (A-Z: know / find out)

I’ll start working on Friday.
This is not wrong, but I would say “I start work on Friday” or “I’m starting work on Friday” if it is definite. (I hope it went well, by the way.)

weird candies that change flavor while licking
…while burning

My favorite part of the video is the scene where Patrick Swayze jumps down the stage and
…jumps down off the stage

Then I noticed that a lot of people wanted to get shopping done before the typhoon came,
Then I realized that… (A-Z: notice / realize)

I also like the song “Unchanged melody” very much.
I think it is called “Unchained Melody.”

When it was aired on TV, she asked me to watch it with her, so I watched it.
Not wrong, but “… so I did” would be more natural.

Hayao Miyazaki seems to be a great geek for airplanes
“Geek” has quite a negative meaning, so maybe “Hayao Miyazaki seems to be really interested in airplanes” or “seems to have a thing about airplanes.”

But as far as I observe him watching English movies at home, he is always reading Japanese subtitles.
Whenever I watch him watching English movies at home, he always seems to be reading the Japanese subtitles.

I’d never seen this kind of movies(story of gangs and mafia) but a frind of mine from high school told me that I should see it.
This is a good example of correct usage of the past perfect tense.

Actually, I asked the same question to David before
Actually, I asked David the same question before

Meg Ryan is still cute even she is getting old.
Meg Ryan is still cute even though she is getting old. (A-Z: even if / even though) By the way, you might make some enemies on this blog if you write that 50 is “getting old”!

This is his first time to do a homestay
This is the first time he has done a homestay. (A-Z: first time)

My son : “Mom, what do you say バス in English?”
I hope you taught him the correct question! “How do you say バス in English”

But it’s hard for me to say the particular scenes where I like in them
But it’s hard for me to say which particular scenes I like because…

I remember when my sons were small, they made so cute mistakes.
They made such cute mistakes. (A-Z: so / such a)

I’m wondering if it is also illegal to post the links (from You Tube) on this blog, because some of the videos are illegally downloaded.
I don’t think so. It is You Tube’s responsibility to take down illegally posted content. The new law is aimed at stopping people downloading music, TV shows, and movies for their own use at home.

I wouldn’t notice what he mouthed if David didn’t tell us about that.
I wouldn’t have noticed what he mouthed if David hadn’t told us about it. (A-Z: if / when)

I deeply agree to what you say!
I strongly agree with what you say! (“Agree to” is only used when someone asks you to do something or when they suggest conditions for something like a contract.)

That’s it for today. Have a great long weekend, and I’ll be back with the new topic on Monday (or maybe Tuesday).

41 Comments

  1. YU on Friday October 5th, 2012 at 06:23 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    > My son : “Mom, what do you say バス in English?”
    I hope you taught him the correct question! “How do you say バス in English”

    Don’t worry, we talked all in Japanese. I’m good at speaking Japanese, actually!
    Thank you for your correction, by the way.

    > But as far as I observe him watching English movies at home, he is always reading Japanese subtitles.
    > Whenever I watch him watching English movies at home, he always seems to be reading the Japanese subtitles.

    I actually wanted to say, “観察している限りは”, but your sentence sounds more natural, of course. Thank you.

    By the way, do you watch Japanese movies without the English subtitles?

    > I don’t think so. It is You Tube’s responsibility to take down illegally posted content. The new law is aimed at stopping people downloading music, TV shows, and movies for their own use at home.

    I see.
    I read the notice by the government in Japanese.
    I read the governmental notice about this law in Japanese.
    It seems that those who uploaded pirated contents into You Tube will be criminally punished from now on, but just watching those videos isn’t illegal as you say.

    Hi Tomo,

    How was your first working day?
    I guess everything went well.
    Please take good rest tonight! 🙂

    Hi everyone,

    Do you guys have any plans for this three-day holiday?
    I don’t have any, but I might go to Yokohama(Motomachi/Yamashita Park/China Town/Marine Tower) with my family.

    Have a great holiday, all!



  2. Fumie on Friday October 5th, 2012 at 11:35 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you so much for your feedback! It was an interesting discussion talking about movies.

    >I think it is called “Unchained Melody.”
     I thought it was called “Unchanged Melody.” and it means 変わらないメロディーbut it’s “Unchained Melody.” and it means something like つながれてない or 自由なメロディー。Thanks for telling us.

    > By the way, you might make some enemies on this blog if you write that 50 is “getting old”!
     I’m sorry I was not careful enough but I didn’t have any negative meaning in this sentence. It seems I don’t understand the meaning of “getting old”. “Getting old” means 老齢になる?, I thought “getting old” also means just 歳を重ねる(若い人が誕生日が来て年を取る場合も)。I should have written ” Meg Ryan looks young for her age/ looks younger than her age.

    >I wouldn’t have noticed what he mouthed if David hadn’t told us about it.
     Oh, no. I did it again! I made a mistake in Subjunctive mood again.

    >”seems to have a thing about airplanes.”
    “Have a thing~” means “I like ~.” It’s new to me.

    It is getting a little cold morning and night. So take care not to catch a cold. Have a wonderful weekend, everyone! 😀

    Fumie



  3. amo on Friday October 5th, 2012 at 11:48 PM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback. The usages of “which” and “where” always give me a hard time and confuse me 🙁

    Hi everyone,

    hope you will be having a nice three-day holiday. I am working on Sunday, though.

    Good night
    amo



  4. Anne on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 06:59 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    >My favorite part of the video is the scene where Patrick Swayze jumps down the stage and
    …jumps down off the stage
    —“jump down off” I see.

    >Then I noticed that a lot of people wanted to get shopping done before the typhoon came,
    Then I realized that… (A-Z: notice / realize)
    —I’ve read many times about the difference between the two in the book, and I made a mistake again!
    I should have kept in mind this part:
    “Notice” means to become aware of of something through one of the five senses.
    “Realize” is used when a person processes information in order to reach a new conclusion or understanding of a situation.
    Thank you.

    Some of you may have the consecutive three holidays.

    Have a lovely weekend, everyone!

    Anne



  5. Biwa on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 08:52 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you always for your feedback in detail.

    I didn’t know that “geek” was a kind of negative word at all. I must be careful when using. “Seem to have a thing about something” might be easy for me to understand because we say “~について一家言持っている” in Japanese. Is “otaku” a word that many westerners might understand?

    “This is his first time he has done a homestay.”
    This structure is quite difficult for me because whenever I hear a perfect tense, I feel it’s something related to the past. “This is his first time” sounds more natural to me, though I’m going to try using the first one.

    “Agree to” and “agree with” are quite complicating for sure! I understand that “agree to a contract/arrangement” is OK, but if a man asks a woman to marry him, will you say “she agreed to his proposal” or “she agreed with his proposal”? I’m still not sure if I can use it properly. Sorry, for being a bad student!

    It was also interesting to know that a candy would “burn” in your mouth! There are some that pop or crackle, too. How interesting!
    If I may ask another question, I know that you lick or suck a lollipop which is an action outside your mouth but when you want to say the action inside your mouth”口の中でなめる、溶かす”, what other words shall be proper?

    Have a nice weekend, everyone!



  6. Tomo on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 08:59 AM

    Hi amo,

    Thanks for your message! 🙂

    >I bet you will find your feet soon at new place

    I really hope so!!

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    >Someone might say it in conversation, but it’s not really standard English. Just “eat out” is fine, though.

    OK. I’ll stick to the expression I usually use.

    >I’ll start working on Friday.
    This is not wrong, but I would say “I start work on Friday” or “I’m starting work on Friday” if it is definite. (I hope it went well, by the way.)

    I see. Actually, I first wrote “I’m staring work…”, but I changed it. I didn’t realize you can use the present tense(“I start work…”) in this case. As you know, I’d never said 働き始める in English. By the way, my first day went well, thanks.

    >Actually, I asked the same question to David before
    Actually, I asked David the same question before

    Oh, I should have used “SVOO” pattern!

    >”seems to have a thing about airplanes.”

    “Have a thing about…” is an interesting expression. I’d like to use it sometime.

    Hi YU,

    I managed to go through the first day though I didn’t really know what I was doing(lol). I learned how to prepare medical records for patients to see the doctor yesterday, and I heard lots of children crying when the doctor gave them a shot(vaccination). I was so tired that I went to bed before ten last night. Anyway, have a great time with your family!!

    Hope you are all enjoying the three-day weekend,

    Tomo



  7. Biwa on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 10:39 AM

    Sorry, I made a mistake!

    >“This is his first time” sounds more natural to me, though I’m going to try using the first one.

    I wanted to say, “He has never done a homestay before” sounds more natural to me…



  8. YU on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 11:49 AM

    Hi David,

    > This is his first time to do a homestay
    This is the first time he has done a homestay. (A-Z: first time)

    I looked into your A-Z book.
    It says, “first time, second timeなどは『過去から今までの回数』の話なので現在完了形を使いましょう”.
    However, when Biwa wrote the sentence above, her son has not yet done a homehome stay(her son leaves for Australia today). She was talking about future.
    Do you use your sentence for the case like that too?

    May I ask you one more?

    Actually I asked this in my comment.
    Do you say “from scene to scene” when you mean “テレビや映画などの最初から最後のシーンまで” just like “from cover to cover”(本の最初から最後のページまで”?

    Hi Tomo and Biwa,

    I found an expression, “I have a thing for her”(彼女に特別な感情を持っている).
    There’s a difference in the preposition(about/for), I understood “have a thing about/for…” means “…に思い入れがある”.

    Hi Tomo,

    >I managed to go through the first day though I didn’t really know what I was doing(lol).

    I’m glad that you went through the first day!
    I know exactly what you mean. You have to learn a lot of new things first, but I know you’ll learn them soon!

    > I heard lots of children crying when the doctor gave them a shot(vaccination).

    Do you work for a children’s clininc?
    You reminded me that my family and I have to get an influenza vaccination. Thank you!



  9. YU on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 11:58 AM

    Hi Biwa,

    > I wanted to say, “He has never done a homestay before” sounds more natural to me…

    I agree.
    In your son’s case, this sentence sounds more natural to me, too.



  10. rinko on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 01:27 PM

    Hi David.
    Thank you for your feedback!
    I really enjoyed reading about lots of movies other members like. Also it’s a good chance to remember the movies that made me moved so much many years ago!

    Hi Anne.
    I saw the movie “When a man loves a woman”,too! I remember I couldn’t see the scene whear Alice gave a speech about herself without tissues just as you mentioned!

    Have a great weekend everyone!

    rinko



  11. amo on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 07:04 PM

    Hi YU,

    If my memory is correct, “have a thing about” uses both like and dislike but I don’t think that “have a thing for” has negative meaning.

    amo



  12. YU on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 07:54 PM

    Hi amo,

    Thank you for your correction.
    So, it probably means “特別な感情がある(好き/嫌い)” rather than “思い入れがある”.

    Hi everyone,

    Today my son counted numbers like this ;

    “ひとつ○、ふたつ○、みっつ○、よっつ○、ごつ×、ろくつ×、ななつ○、はちつ×、きゅうつ×、じゅっつ×”.

    I must teach Japanese to him more seriously!



  13. Fumie on Saturday October 6th, 2012 at 08:31 PM

    Hi everyone,

    Regarding “Have a thing~” I found a site. Please have a look.
    http://www.asajikan.jp/asabijin/monica/archives/1886

    Fumie



  14. Biwa on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 12:48 AM

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for your correction!
    I guess, I simply should have used future forms for this case.

    “This is going to be his first time to do a homestay.”

    I love the way your son counts! It’s more reasonable.
    My sons used to call “rib bones(ろっ骨)” “じゅっ骨”!
    They always stroke their chests and tried to count how many rib bones they had.



  15. Biwa on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 09:10 AM

    stroke-stroked-stroked!

    “They always stroked their chests and….”

    What a shame I should have made such an elementary mistake!



  16. YU on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 12:56 PM

    Hi everyone,

    I was planning to go to the park near my house with my familiy today, but unfortunately it has been raining since this morning.

    Hi Fumie,

    Thank you for the link!
    Do you think モニカ先生 is 美しすぎる英会話講師!?
    She certainly “looks” beautiful, but I’d like to see her スッピン face. 😉

    Hi Biwa,

    >I guess, I simply should have used future forms for this case.
    “This is going to be his first time to do a homestay.”

    Actually I also often say, “This is(/is going to be) my first time to do …” in conversation.

    However, David says in A-Z book(“first time”/P102) that it is not standard English, and some native speakers of Englsih even find it a bit weird.

    > My sons used to call “rib bones(ろっ骨)” “じゅっ骨”!
    They always stroke their chests and tried to count how many rib bones they had.

    Children always create reasonable words themselves.
    My son can count numbers 0 to 100(or more) in the standard way of counting numbers(いち、に、さん…), but I didn’t know that he couldn’t even count to 10 in the different way(ひとつ、ふたつ…)!



  17. David Barker on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 01:03 PM

    Hi Fumie,

    You could use the phrase “getting older.” “Getting old” and “getting older” have very different meanings.

    Hi Biwa,

    You could say “He has never done a homestay before,” “This will be the first time he has done a homestay,” or “This will be his first homestay.” I understand what you mean about feeling that “perfect tenses” refer to the past, but remember that English also has a future perfect tense.

    Next week, we will have been together for two years.
    By Christmas, I will have saved enough money to go abroad.

    Hi YU,

    You cannot say “from scene to scene” to talk about watching a movie all the way through. You would have to say “from beginning to end” or “from start to finish.”



  18. YU on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 07:09 PM

    Hi

    > You cannot say “from scene to scene” to talk about watching a movie all the way through. You would have to say “from beginning to end” or “from start to finish.”

    I got it.
    It seems that “read cover to cover” is a special case.

    > but remember that English also has a future perfect tense.

    Next week, we will have been together for two years.
    By Christmas, I will have saved enough money to go abroad.

    To be honest, I completely forgot about “future perfect tense”. Do you use it often? I even can’t remember if I learned about it at school….
    I’d like to use it sometime.
    Thank you.



  19. YU on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 07:13 PM

    > Hi

    Sorry, I wanted to write “Hi David,”.



  20. David Barker on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 09:01 PM

    Hi YU and Biwa,

    When you talk about children making new words, I think the appropriate adjective would be “logical,” not “reasonable.”



  21. Fumie on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 09:14 PM

    Hi David,

    >You could use the phrase “getting older.” “Getting old” and “getting older” have very different meanings.
    I see. I should be careful to use the right one not to be hated by others. Thank you. It’s really good to know the difference of the two words. 🙂

    About “I have a thing for/about~”, the site I posted before explained, “I have a thing for~” means “I like ~” ,and “I have a thing about~” means “I don’t like~” in most cases.
    I checked example sentences in my dictionary and one of them is:
    “He has a thing about frogs.カエルが大嫌い{大好き}だ。So as amo said “Have a thing about~” means both “I like~” and “I don’t like~”.

    Fumie



  22. Anne on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 10:29 PM

    Hi Fumie and David,

    The discussion about “getting old” and “getting older” is interesting. In Japanese, “年齢を重ねる” implies something positive. When you say, “…even though she is getting older.”, I’m wondering if it is offensive or not.
    By the way, I didn’t get mad at all when I read your comment,Fumie:)

    Fumie, I forgot to answer you. Yes, I watched the musical at Nagoya last year. After the show, my friends and I had tea at a restaurant, and then some of the members came into there. We had a chance to talk with them for a while. Lucky us!

    >“He has a thing about frogs.カエルが大嫌い{大好き}だ—I happened to hear someone say in the TV program today “This is not your thing.(君にはむかない。) This might not be the same, but I thought the usage of “thing” was interesting I guess this is kind of “New Car Phenomenon” that David mentioned on the blog before:)

    Good night,

    Anne



  23. Anne on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 10:38 PM

    it’s me again.
    As for “The New Car Phenomenon”, you can read his entry in the following entry:(Just for the record July 12, 2006)

    http://eng.alc.co.jp/kaiwa/davidbarker/2006/06/the_new_car_phe_1.html

    Anne



  24. Anne on Sunday October 7th, 2012 at 10:39 PM

    Sorry,it’s not”July” but “June.”



  25. Fumie on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 05:32 AM

    Hi Anne,

    You were very lucky to had a chance to talk with members of the musical!

    Thanks for telling us about David’s theory of “New Car Phenomenon”. I think this theory is very effective to learn languages.
    And I noticed that older blogs were much easier: lots of Japanese as Tomo said recently. That will be this week’s topic. Good timing for us to read old entry.

    Fumie



  26. Biwa on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 05:40 AM

    Hi David,

    I woke up this morning (quite early for me!) with a kind of light bulb flashing in my head!

    When I read your explanation last night, I thought these two sentences you gave me were easy for me to understand because I know that you’re talking about a thing that will be “finished” at the time mentioned.

    >Next week, we will have been together for two years.
    >By Christmas, I will have saved enough money to go abroad.

    However, “This is/will be his first time he has done a homestay.” was still half-clear for me.
    I guess the reason why I couldn’t understand this sentence from the bottom of my heart was the word “This”.

    Japanese sense of “this”⇒(10/6-homestay-10/13)⇐English sense of “this”

    When we say “korega hajimete desu”, we are looking at the very beginning of the homestay, so it can’t be finished at that time, but I suppose in English, we need to look at the very ending part of the homestay where the whole homestay is finished!
    So, it must be very natural to use a perfect tense, and if this is correct, I think I got it!
    I hope I’m right.



  27. Biwa on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 08:14 AM

    Hi Anne,

    Thanks for the link to “The new car phenomenon”.
    I also read some other articles like “Dangers of dictionaries”, “Playing the Cello” and “Finding your own Way”. They all rang quite true to my heart. I’m glad I came to know this blog, although I still don’t think I can ever finish reading.



  28. YU on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 11:39 AM

    Hi early bird Biwa,

    > Japanese sense of “this”⇒(10/6-homestay-10/13)⇐English sense of “this”

    I looked into a reference book.
    It says that there are 3 usages in future perfect past tense ; 『完了・結果』, 『継続』, 『経験』.
    It gives an example sentence of the usage of 『経験』 ;

    “I will have seen the musical three times if I see it again.”
    (もう一回観たら、私はそのミュージカルを3回観たことになる。)

    You can say “This is/will be his first time he has done a homestay.” in other words,

    “My son will have done a homestay first time if he does it (this time).”

    > When we say “korega hajimete desu”, we are looking at the very beginning of the homestay, so it can’t be finished at that time, but I suppose in English, we need to look at the very ending part of the homestay where the whole homestay is finished!

    I’m not very sure about which point in time “this” actually means in English, but I know exactly what you mean.
    でも英語では単に『未来にほぼ確実に経験することを言っている』気がします、個人的な意見ですが。だから文法的には間違いかもしれないけど単純に『未来形』を使うネイティブの人がいるんではないでしょうか?



  29. Biwa on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 05:26 PM

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for looking into your book!

    >でも英語では単に『未来にほぼ確実に経験することを言っている』気がします

    YUが書いてくださったこと、よく理解できます。ありがとう!
    でもこの「経験」という言葉も、「経験し終わった一つのかたまり」という視点で考えるからこそ、「過去完了」を使うのだ、ということがすっきりと理解できる気がするのです。(私が変なだけかも・・・。)
    一方、日本語は、もともと時制の概念はあいまいですが、特にfirst timeと一緒になると、「経験」は「まだやっていないこと」つまり「前」からの視点なので、この構文がどうにもスッキリと理解できなかった(・・・というか自分で使えそうな気がしなかった)のです。

    でも、これに「継続」の意味がくっつくと、「過去完了」を使うことは簡単に理解できるから不思議です。
    This is the first time I have been together with him for such a long time.
    合ってますか?ちょっと変な例文かも・・・許してください。

    Anyway, thank you always for helping me!



  30. YU on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 07:47 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    > この構文がどうにもスッキリと理解できなかった(・・・というか自分で使えそうな気がしなかった)のです。

    I felt the same way as you.

    Hi everyone,

    I went to アカチャンホンポ to buy something for my son. I saw many kinds of ランドセルs displaying there.
    By the way, does anyone know why ランドセルs are already sold in Autumn every year, while schools start in April? I’ve been wondering it since long…
    You’ve discussed how expensive ランドセルs are in the older entry, haven’t you? I read it and totally agreed with you at the time.
    However, today I found very cheap brand-name(セイバン天使のはね) ランドセルs at the アカチャンホンポ. They are just 2 years older models, but they cost only 5000yen while the latest models cost 40000yen to 50000yen!! Can you beleive that?? And the cheap ones were displayed on the shelves right in back of the shelves for the expensive latest model ones.
    To be honest, I almost couldn’t find any difference between the old ones and the latest ones, but the new ones cost almost 10 times as the old ones!!
    I thought “Who would buy such an expensive one! It’s just like throwing money down the drain!!”, but a family with a daughter came and bought exactly the expensive one in front of me! I couldn’t believe my eyes, of course that is not my business, though…
    My husband and I almost thought about buying the cheap one, but there were only girl’s colours left, so we didn’t buy anything finally.

    I’m getting excited while writing this…I’m sorry…
    Thank you for reading my ケチケチ story!
    I guess a person like me is exactly the root of the deflationary spiral today…

    See you !



  31. David Barker on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 07:52 PM

    Hi YU and Biwa,

    Be careful with these sentences:

    >You can say “This is/will be his first time he has done a homestay.” in other words,

    This is not correct. It would have to be “This is the first time he has done a homestay.”

    >“My son will have done a homestay first time if he does it (this time).”

    This is not correct either, I’m afraid. It should be “If my son does a homestay, it will be his first time” or “it will be the first time he has done one.”

    Hi everyone,

    I was out all day today. I’ll do the new entry tomorrow.

    Hope you are all enjoying the long weekend.



  32. YU on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 08:17 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your correction.

    >“My son will have done a homestay first time if he does it (this time).”

    This is not correct either, I’m afraid. It should be “If my son does a homestay, it will be his first time” or “it will be the first time he has done one.”

    I got it.
    I wonder the example in my reference book is also wrong…
    “I will have seen the musical three times if I see it again.”
    (もう一回観たら、私はそのミュージカルを3回観たことになる。)

    If it is wrong, I should not use the book any more. If it is correct, I don’t understand the differences between the two sentences.
    I’d like to use the future perfect tense sometime, but it is still too difficult for me.



  33. Biwa on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 09:00 PM

    Hi David,

    I guess I made a mistake when quoting the correct sentences from your reply.

    “This is/will be the first time he has done a homestay.” is the right one and I think I understand this time.

    Hi YU,

    I think your reference book is OK. “the first time” and “three times” are different.
    If you say “My son will have done a homestay once, if he (actually) does one.” it might be similar to the example in your book, although I guess this sentence is very unnatural.



  34. David Barker on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 09:43 PM

    Hi YU,

    The example in your book is fine. As Biwa says, the problem is “first time.” It cannot be used in the same way as “once” or “twice.” You could say “My son will have done a homestay twice if he does it this time.”



  35. YU on Monday October 8th, 2012 at 10:15 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your correction.

    > As Biwa says, the problem is “first time.” It cannot be used in the same way as “once” or “twice.” You could say “My son will have done a homestay twice if he does it this time.”

    I see.
    I thought my original sentence was completely wrong when I saw your corrections.
    Anyway, unlike Biwa, it looks like it’s going to be a while before I learn to use this grammar well.



  36. Biwa on Tuesday October 9th, 2012 at 09:00 AM

    Hi everyone,

    This has nothing to do with the topic, but isn’t it wonderful that Mr. Yamanaka and Mr. Gurdon shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their iPS cells study?
    I was watching the news this morning and the acceptance speech Mr. Yamanaka gave was so moving that it brought tears to my eyes! He said he has never forgotten that for people suffering incurable diseases, a day or a month is never the same as they are for healthy people and that he will keep trying to study harder as to make new medicines as quickly as possible. He also said he wanted them to keep “hoping”. He is 50 now and seems to be full of energy. I really do hope that he can help those people.



  37. Anne on Tuesday October 9th, 2012 at 11:07 AM

    Hi Biwa and everyone,

    Biwa, I watched the news,too. His speech(his interview) was so sincere and touching. Since the discovery of iPS cells by him, tons of people have been paying attention to his research, and he has been expected to win the Award. There are some controversial and ethical issues, but as you mentioned, this research is still a light and hope for patients who are suffering from incurable diseases.
    Actually, I happened to hear about stem cell research from a doctor who is also a classmate the community college. He has been doing the research and explained how important and effective this discovery is.

    I’m also hoping that Haruki Murakami wins the Nobel Prize in Literature.

    See you soon,

    Anne



  38. YU on Tuesday October 9th, 2012 at 12:39 PM

    Hi Biwa and Anne,

    To be honest, I didn’t really like doctors who are interested in nothing but writing their thesises to be praised in academic circles until I knew about him.
    However, I heard that Prof. Yamanaka is extremely clumsy with his hands, and so he used to be called “ジャマナカ”, not “ヤマナカ” by his co-workers when he worked as a plastic surgeon at a university long time ago.
    Probably he can’t satisfy patients by his surgical skills, but his discoveries might save lots of patients suffering from incurable diseases. That’s really amazing.
    Each person has his own forte and foible!

    I’ve also heard that most of the Novel Prize winners in science received the awards first after they really got old. I think they should receive it earlier so that they can get enough contributions for their further researchs when they are still full of energy.



  39. Biwa on Tuesday October 9th, 2012 at 02:57 PM

    Hi Anne and YU,

    I guess, as you both used, the word “research” is used more than “study” in Japan Times. I thought they both mean “研究・調査する” but there seeems to be a slight difference. I looked into the dictionary but I can’t find it yet. Do you have any ideas?

    Anne, I hope Haruki Murakami can win the prize, too!

    YU, the expression “forte and foible” was new to me. I might use it some time.



  40. YU on Tuesday October 9th, 2012 at 04:49 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    > I looked into the dictionary but I can’t find it yet. Do you have any ideas?

    Actually I just copied the word “research” from Anne’s comment, but I found a site that explains the differences between the two words. Here it is ;
    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_difference_between_study_and_research

    > YU, the expression “forte and foible” was new to me

    It was new to me, too.
    I just copied it from my dictionary.
    I’m not really sure if it is commonly used…



  41. Biwa on Tuesday October 9th, 2012 at 07:54 PM

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for the interesting link!

    This is quite tricky because of course they must be gathering lots of data through various experiments(researching) while they must be “studying” them carefully at the same time to come to some conclusion.
    Anyway, I guess that when you are talking about a “new field”, as they must be focusing more on the “researching” than on the “studying”, it is more natural to use the word “research”. I think I get it.



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