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Looking at this week’s comments, it seems that pay and bonus levels do appear to be falling all over Japan. I must admit I thought this would be the case, but it’s interesting to hear other people’s experiences. I guess nobody really knows what will happen when the tax rate goes up, but if it does lead to a deflationary spiral, I hope the Japanese people will get very angry with the politicians who insisted on bringing it in.

It seems that like me, most of you agree that although the tax will need to be raised at some point in the future, now is not the time to do it. Despite all their promises, this government has turned out to be a huge disappointment. To be honest, I don’t even think there is any real difference between the LDP and the DPJ anymore. I’m sure you all saw the news this week that ex-prime minister Abe has been chosen as the “new” leader of his party. I cannot think of any other country where a failed leader like that would be given a second chance. It seems like a big step backwards when what Japan clearly needs is to be taking at least some small steps forwards.

By the way, some of you were wondering about the difference between cakes and biscuits, but there are far more ridiculous arguments than that one in the UK. This year, the government decided to put consumption tax on sausage rolls and pasties that were sold hot, but not ones that were sold cold. Of course, this caused all kinds of confusion. For example, what if you heat a pasty up, but then sell it after it has cooled down a bit? Should it be taxed or not? It was so ridiculous that in the end, the government gave up on the idea. Having tax on some things but not on others is a good idea in principle, but it’s quite difficult to implement in practice.

Anyway, here is some feedback on your comments.

I have heard from my older brother that his salary was cut…
My older brother told me that… (A-Z: hear from)

As a natural consequence his salary has gone down since then.
Nice sentence.

Terrible accidents happened yesterday in Miyagi and Yokosuka.
There were two terrible accidents yesterday in ….

I feel relieved when I heard there were the dead in the train accident in Yokosuka.
I was relieved when I heard that no one had died.

I couldn’t agree with you more.
This is a good expression to learn if you don’t know it.

That means more work for the same salary and that’s not fair!
True, but it’s a nice sentence.

I wrote my comment after an interval of one month! Sorry…
It’s been a month since I last wrote a comment.

Of course, I’m happy with it if the government would not raise the consumption tax.
Of course, I would be happy if the government didn’t raise the consumption tax.

I still get in touch with friends from there.
I still keep in touch with friends from there.

But his salary and bonus got down sharply.
But his salary and bonus went down sharply.

I’ve read in somewhere before that….
I’ve read somewhere before that….

but they just put too much energy on “raising” taxes.
but they just put too much emphasis on raising taxes.

I’m afraid it’s quite common story in Japan last for some years.
I’m afraid it’s become quite a common story in Japan in recent years.

I’m not saying this because my husband is a foreigner!!
In this context, we would probably say “It’s not only/just because….

a friend of mine told me that her husband who works for an automobile company had to stay at home for weeks
This is quite interesting. If you don’t separate “who works for an automobile company” from the rest of the sentence with commas, it looks as though your friend has more than one husband! So it should be “Her husband, who works for an automobile company, had to….”

I’ll just correct students’ papers(junior high school English) by PC.
Feel free to ask if there is anything you are not sure about.

Congratulations for getting a job.
Congratulations on getting a job.

“Your talks reminds me ” should be “Your talks remind me.”
It should be “Your discussion reminded me…” or “Your comments reminded me….” (A-Z: talk)

“I lived together to take care of my parents-in-law.” should be “I lived together with my parents-in-law to take care of them.”
I lived with my parents-in-law so that I could take care of them.

What a coincidence!(← I wanted to use a different expression, but I couldn’t think of any other one. Do you have any suggestions, David?)
That’s the one I would use. I can’t think of anything else that would fit there.

Regarding the tax difference of cakes and biscuits, …
Regarding the tax difference between cakes and biscuits, …

And she drove me home!
Nice sentence.

I suspect a bit that it might be because of the last part of the URL.
Nice sentence.

Anyway, it is nice to know that I’m still “useful” for someone else outside home!
The thing that Japan needs more than anything is children, so you are already doing a useful job!

That’s all for today. We have done two fairly heavy topics recently, so I’ll try to think of something a bit lighter for Monday.

Have a great weekend, and feel free to ask if you have any questions about my feedback.

33 Comments

  1. Biwa on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 07:58 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    It’s very nice to know how other people think about various topics and you even get your sentences corrected for free!
    I was always trying to improve my English skills by reading or watching things on TV but trying to write here, even if it’s a weird sentence, makes me feel I’m really building up a sentence to express what I think.
    Well, I’d like to join in here as much as I can.
    Looking forward to seeing your next topic!

    Have a pleasant weekend!



  2. YU on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 10:31 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback!

    > I’m sure you all saw the news this week that ex-prime minister Abe has been chosen as the “new” leader of his party. I cannot think of any other country where a failed leader like that would be given a second chance.

    I agree.
    When I heard that he will run in the LDP leadership election, I couldn’t believe my ears.
    Just several years ago, he explained that he could not handle the hard work of the prime minister due to bad health condition, but now he wants to become the LDP leader and maybe even the prime minister again. According to him, a new medicine was developed, and it is so effective that he can work as hard as before! Congratulation, Abe san!

    > I have heard from my older brother that his salary was cut…
    My older brother told me that… (A-Z: hear from)

    Oh No, I did it again!
    Because your question begins with “Have you” (Have you heard any of your friends talking about…?), I answered “I have heard…” without thinking much about it. Anyway, now I know it was wrong. Thank you for your correction.

    > I’ll just correct students’ papers(junior high school English) by PC.
    Feel free to ask if there is anything you are not sure about.

    Yes, I will.
    Thank you for your kind offer!

    > The thing that Japan needs more than anything is children, so you are already doing a useful job!

    Thank you for your kind message.
    Having read the comments of other mom members, I felt very much at ease!

    Have a great weekend all!

    See you!



  3. YU on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 12:27 PM

    Hi Biwa,,

    Thank you for your comment!

    > it is said that they are favorably treated in the way of paying taxes.

    Very true. People often say that “坊主丸もうけ”.
    I don’t know if they’re really rich as it is said, though.

    > Some people are saying they should pay more taxes before raising the consumption tax and I definitely agree

    Maybe they should pay more taxes before raising the consumption tax as they say.
    However, I believe that what the government should do the first is not pointing out every little waste nor unfairness between tax payers, but recovering the economy. I’m not saying those efforts are all unnecessary, though…
    When the economy is down, people start talking mainly about reducing expenditures. The good example is “事業仕分け”, but as you know, it had almost no effect after all. I don’t think the economy would recover even if the government just cut down on spending. The economy will remain bad as before.

    By the way, yesterday I found an interesting article on Japan Today. It is related to the topic we discussed last week. You can read a large variety of comments of people from other countires about Japanese history education.

    http://www.japantoday.com/category/politics/view/s-korea-japan-must-educate-its-people-about-world-war-ii

    Most of the members(on this blog)commented that Japanese students today learn the true, detailed Japanese history, but the only thing I can’t understand is that why majority of people from other countries(not only neighbouring countries) still don’t think that way. And it is simply hard for me to believe that people in the rest of the world learn the “false” history, and only Japanese people learn the “true” history.

    I’m sorry, I’m not going to comment further on this, but please have a look at the article if you have time!

    See you next week!

    See you !



  4. David Barker on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 01:20 PM

    Hi YU,

    I read that article, too. I thought about posting a link yesterday, but I didn’t want to go back to an old topic.

    Unusually for Japan Today, I thought the commenters posted some really well balanced arguments. A lot of people talked about problems with history education in Japan, but one guy said he talked to his Japanese wife about it, and she knew everything that he did. Another poster made the point that British and Americans are not taught very much about the atrocities that our countries committed in the past either. If we argue that the islands belong to China because Japan stole them in a war 100 years ago, doesn’t the United States belong to the native Indians?

    I think the biggest problem is one of perception. Japanese people see themselves as a peace-loving nation, as indeed most of them are. In other countries, however, pre-war Japan is considered to have been similar to Nazi Germany. The problem is that while Germany has succeeded in convincing the world that it is sorry about its actions, Japan has not, and it never will as long as you have nationalist politicians saying and doing stupid things. My favourite comment on the article was this one:

    “I have travelled all around the world, and guess what, most people are just trying to work hard to feed their families and put food on the table, they have no particular hate or dislike of anyone, they are just trying to live the best they can. How long are we going to let politicians play political football with sensitive issues for their own selfish gain.”

    I feel exactly the same.



  5. David Barker on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 01:40 PM

    By the way, did you see the story about the Japanese and Taiwanese ships firing water cannons at each other? Is that the level we have sunk to?? Squirting water at each other?! Are we not a bit too old for that kind of thing?



  6. amo on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 03:18 PM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback:)

    Hi YU and David,

    I took a look the article that YU mentioned. I haven’t read all comments on it though. I liked the comment that David’s favourite. I feel the same too, though I haven’t travelled all around the world, though.

    I am off to the dentist and check my teeth.
    Bye for now.

    amo



  7. YU on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 03:29 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your comment.

    > I thought about posting a link yesterday, but I didn’t want to go back to an old topic.

    I didn’t want either, but this article is too interesting too ignore!

    > but one guy said he talked to his Japanese wife about it, and she knew everything that he did

    I read the comment, too.
    But I don’t think she is the average Japanese, I’m afraid.
    A few months ago, I had a small chat with friends of mine from my English club about Okinawa. They are all age of 35-40, and some of them even graduated from very famous universities. However, nobody could answer immediately which country Okinawa used to be under controled before 1972! Do you think they are just “slow” by chance? I don’t think so.
    As I mentioned before, “most” Japanese people are either not really interested in Japanese history or forget almost everything that they learned at school. I was one of them!

    > The problem is that while Germany has succeeded in convincing the world that it is sorry about its actions, Japan has not, and it never will as long as you have nationalist politicians saying and doing stupid things

    I agree.

    “I have travelled all around the world, and guess what, most people are just trying to work hard to feed their families and put food on the table, they have no particular hate or dislike of anyone, they are just trying to live the best they can. How long are we going to let politicians play political football with sensitive issues for their own selfish gain.”

    Very true.
    My husband comes from one of the victim countries of Japanese army. But he loves Japan, and what he interested in the most is raising his son together with his Japanese wife. And when I visited his family house, everyone including older generations welcomed me and even explained me how much they appreciate Japan’s economic support and technological assistance.
    However, it is very sad that Japan has not yet succeeded in having a good relationship like that with some of other Asian countries.

    > By the way, did you see the story about the Japanese and Taiwanese ships firing water cannons at each other? Is that the level we have sunk to?? Squirting water at each other?! Are we not a bit too old for that kind of thing?

    No, not yet.
    Do they need my son’s water pistol, maybe?



  8. David Barker on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 03:53 PM

    Hi YU

    You might be joking about the water pistol, but that is basically exactly what they were doing! I half-expected their mothers to come and shout at them to come home for dinner!



  9. YU on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 05:18 PM

    Hi David,

    It might sound I side with Japan, but what else can Japan do against China and Taiwan?
    I’m sure Japan wouldn’t do anything if they didn’t claim. I have to admit that Ishihara provoked them, though.
    Our PM Noda already explained the historical progress why Senkaku became Japanese territory today in his speech last month. And that is all what we can do.
    I also think what we are doing is very childish, but I don’t think it’s Japan’s fault. Or is it?
    As many of JT commentators say, you would end up returning all the lands you gained through wars and treaties in the past if all countries in this world claimed like them.



  10. Fumie on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 09:28 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    I thought British tax system was good but it seems there are some not so good points.
    Whether putting tax or not differ depending on the food is hot or cold is ridiculous.
    >Having tax on some things but not on others is a good idea in principle, but it’s quite difficult to implement in practice.
    I guess so. If Japan would adopt this tax system, they should think it through before they starts it.

    > To be honest, I don’t even think there is any real difference between the LDP and the DPJ anymore.
    Me, neither.
    And I was surprised when Mr. Abe was elected as the leader of LDP. Can he lead Japan in the right direction this time? I can’t expect him too much.

    Hi YU,

    >And when I visited his family house, everyone including older generations welcomed me and even explained me how much they appreciate Japan’s economic support and technological assistance.
    Oh, your husband’s family and relatives? are such a nice folks and generous. You are lucky to be married to a good husband from a wonderful family!

    Tomorrow is sport day at my son’s school. But it might be postponed due to typhoon. We made a big Teruteru-bozu!

    Have a pleasnat day, everyone!

    Fumie



  11. Anne on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 10:15 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.
    >“Your talks reminds me ” should be “Your talks remind me.”
    It should be “Your discussion reminded me…” or “Your comments reminded me….” (A-Z: talk)
    —I did the same mistake again! I found the check in the book. I’m afraid I need to fill the gap between the real usage and my understanding.

    Have a lovely weekend,everyone,

    Anne



  12. Tomo on Saturday September 29th, 2012 at 11:41 PM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your feedback!

    >a friend of mine told me that her husband who works for an automobile company had to stay at home for weeks
    This is quite interesting. If you don’t separate “who works for an automobile company” from the rest of the sentence with commas, it looks as though your friend has more than one husband! So it should be “Her husband, who works for an automobile company, had to….”

    I see. I should have used non-restrictive relative here. I didn’t realize my sentence sounded like that. Commas can make a big difference!

    >What a coincidence!(← I wanted to use a different expression, but I couldn’t think of any other one. Do you have any suggestions, David?)
    That’s the one I would use. I can’t think of anything else that would fit there.

    OK, thanks. I wrote the comment after Anne and YU used that phrase, so it made me want to use a different expression. I hope this means I’m learning the sense of speakers of English 🙂

    Hi Fumie,

    I hope your teruteru-bozu will do a great job!

    Hope you are all enjoying your weekend,

    Tomo



  13. Gussan on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 08:29 AM

    Hi everyone,

    When I watch and listen to the territory problem, I am just stunned. So, I’d like to post any comments.

    Change our mind.

    A friend of mine let me know a funny video clip.
    I’d like to share with it you.

    If you have a spare time, please watch it.

    http://www.youtube.com/embed/9wm-Ge8LL7o?rel=0

    You must have good laughter.

    See ya,



  14. YU on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 08:35 AM

    Hi Fumie,

    I’m wondering if your son’s sports festival is going to be held today as scheduled…

    > Oh, your husband’s family and relatives? are such a nice folks and generous. You are lucky to be married to a good husband from a wonderful family!

    Thank you!
    Actually not only his family and relatives, but also people from his country are all friendly and not complicated by nature. It might be one of the reasons why they forgave Japan’s war crimes and accepted our apology and compensation without objecting. I have a feeling that the diplomacy of the country has a bit to do with the characteristics of the people…

    Well, my husband is optimistic and easygoing, and I’m opposite, but we’re harmonized somehow.
    After marrying him, I realized that is exactly the essential point for your marriage life!
    Don’t you think so?

    PS Tomo,

    > I hope your teruteru-bozu will do a great job!

    I like this sentence very much!



  15. Biwa on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 09:18 AM

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for the link.
    So many comments that I skip-read the last half!
    I’m also one of those who agree with the comment that David said it was his favorite. I also can’t forget the one that said a French scholar insisted that a history book should be written by someone from a neutral country. I mean, I don’t think this the right thing to do, but I can’t help feeling that Japanese history teachers are at least trying to teach their students that there ARE different ways of thinking from the other side, I’m afraid the Korean or Chinese teachers are not. Recently, I was thinking of a silly idea if we could set up something like a “history book writing project” within these countries, and use it as a textbook to teach our children. Then, I found it again! on Wikipedea that there actually was one, but they failed because of the too fierce anti-Japanese sentiments.

    Adding to that, I saw a TV program called 池上彰の「そもそも領土ってなんだ?」last night.
    Though the Koreans or Chinese might say completely opposite things, I thought Ikegami was doing pretty well on his lecture, but the guest speakers were so silly!
    I don’t understand why they invited such guests just to make them angrier!

    By the way, I’m going to switch my brain to a weekend mode today. My elder son is going to Australia from Saturday for a one-week-homestay.
    I’m going to look for a nice little gift for the family who is going to take care of my son and his classmate. Do you have any good ideas for a gift?



  16. Biwa on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 09:33 AM

    Hi Gussan,

    Though I knew what was going to happen from the beginning, I surely laughed a lot!!!!
    I especially like the expression on the little boy’s face to see his chubby mother soaked in water! Thanks for sharing!



  17. Biwa on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 10:24 AM

    Hi everyone,

    Talking about my son’s homestay, I recieved some profiles of the host family. It says that they have 4 children and their names are Alex, Matthew, Lachlan and Oliver. Could anyone tell me how to pronounce the third name and if it’s a boy’s name or a girl’s?
    Their ages are 18, 16, 14 and 12. I was thinking that they might be interested in those Japanese magazines for teens.



  18. Fumie on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 11:30 AM

    Hi YU and Tomo,

    Unfortunately, sport day was postponed and the school was closed today. That means we gonna eat Obento at home. It took long time to prepare it.
    What a shame!

    >I have a feeling that the diplomacy of the country has a bit to do with the characteristics of the people…
    I think your husband’s country is a very good one.

    >Don’t you think so?
    Yes, I think so. My husband and I have different chracters and sometimes it’s good and sometimes not so good. But if both of us were worrywarts or were obsessed with education, I guess the atmosphere of the house would be so tense.

    Hi Gussan,

    Thanks for sharing a funny video. I laughed a lot!

    Hi Biwa,

    Your son is going to go homestay in Australia. It would be a great experience for him! I’m not sure but teens like goods of Japanese sub-culture. Sorry, I don’t know how to read Lachlan.

    Fumie



  19. David Barker on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 11:40 AM

    I think it is probably pronounced “Lacklan,” and it’s a boy’s name. I think it’s a Scottish name originally. And I think manga would be a good idea as a present.



  20. YU on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 12:18 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    Thank you for your comment.

    > I also can’t forget the one that said a French scholar insisted that a history book should be written by someone from a neutral country.

    !!!
    That was one of the most impressive comments for me too!

    > on Wikipedea that there actually was one, but they failed because of the too fierce anti-Japanese sentiments.

    Ah, やっぱり~。

    > Adding to that, I saw a TV program called 池上彰の「そもそも領土ってなんだ?」last night.

    I saw it, too!

    > I don’t understand why they invited such guests just to make them angrier!

    I guess that was the roll they had to play in the program. Some guests might be really “silly” as you felt, but I don’t think 柴田理恵 or 船越英次郎 aren’t that silly as they looked in the program.
    池上さん’s programs are ususally made for those who are not really familiar with politics or history(average Japanese), so I guess the two had to play “a silly person”. This is just my imagination, though! 🙂

    > My elder son is going to Australia from Saturday for a one-week-homestay.

    Wow! Sounds great!
    I wish I could be young again!

    Hi Fumie,

    Oh, you woke up early and cooked, but you have to eat Obento at home… That’s sad…
    Next time you should make a much bigger teruteru-bozu!!

    See you !



  21. Kyon on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 12:25 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback.

    >I feel relieved when I heard there were the dead in the train accident in Yokosuka.
    I was relieved when I heard that no one had died.
    ー It is a very simple sentence.
    I will try to write much simpler English from now.

    >I couldn’t agree with you more.
    This is a good expression to learn if you don’t know it.
    ー Absolutelu true. I haven’t used the subjunctive mood(仮定法) in the conversation, however I try to use it as much as possible to develop my English expression.

    This week I’m going to the Sanriku area in Tohoku again. A long long long way to go before the Tohoku district goes back to normal. However there is a good news. Onagawa town(女川町) and another town(I forgot a name)just made blue prints of their towns’ restoration plans with citizens’approval. I hope other cities and towns will follow them. Some people want to live in the same places before the tsunami attacked and others want to build their houses on higher places. It is difficult to obtain full consent from every citizens. It is leaders’role(mayors)that consolidate people’s opinions and make them take a step forward .

    If you have time, energy, and some money, please visit Tohoku and drop some money as the wonderful season of autumunal foliage is around the corner there.

    Have a lovely weekend,everyone,
    Kyon



  22. Biwa on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 01:49 PM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for your reply!
    I just looked into the internet and found that “Lachlan” was the second most popular name in Queensland! Wow!

    Mangas! Your right. I’m going to look for some later.



  23. Yukako on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 01:53 PM

    Hi David,

    Thank you for your feedback. I usually don’t think about Japanese politics and economy. This week’s topic gave me a chance to think about Japanese future.

    Hi everyone,

    How do you like this weather? In Tokai district, it’s been raining since this morning. I decided to spend a day at home…

    Hane a nice weekend!



  24. YU on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 03:03 PM

    Hi Gussan,

    Thank you for the video!
    I had a big laugh!
    Lovely German people!! 🙂

    Hi Yukako and everyone,

    I heard the typhoon approaches my area(Kanagawa) this evening. I finished my grocery shopping already before noon. I saw much much more shoppers than usual at the supermarket. I guess they had the same idea as me.



  25. Tomo on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 09:18 PM

    Hi everyone,

    How are you doing? We ate lunch out with my father, my sisters and her family to celebrate our father’s 70th birthday, which is called 古希(koki) in Japanese. We had a lovely meal, and my father enjoyed a glass of wine and looked very happy, so I’m happy too.

    Gussan, thanks for the video. I laughed a lot, and my daughter asked me, “Mom, why are you laughing so hard??”, so I shared the video with her 😉

    YU, I’m glad you liked it 🙂

    Biwa, I hope your son has a wonderful time there!

    Fumie, I’m sorry to hear that. I know how hard it is to make a big obento for 5 people!

    Kyon, I can’t help Tohoku in the same way as you now, but I buy things made in Tohoku like rice.

    Yukako, it’s windy and raining where I live(Kanto region), and my daughter is scared of the sound of the wind.

    Hope you are all well,

    Tomo



  26. YU on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 10:12 PM

    Hi David,

    I have a question about the usage of “as long as…”.

    This is my sentence.

    > Japanese economy will not be collapsed as long as the government borrowed money only from people of their own country

    And this is your sentence.

    > and it never will as long as you have nationalist politicians saying and doing stupid things.

    I think I should have written “borrows” correctly.
    Am I right?
    However, I have a feeling that I’ve seen somewhere before that “as long as…” was used in the meaning of the subjunctive mood(past tense verb) in the sentence.
    Was it just my misunderstanding???
    But if I were right, could you give me some usage examples?



  27. Yukako on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 10:38 PM

    Hi YU,

    My mother went shopping in the afternoon. When she got home, she was sopping wet. You are so smart to finish shopping before the typhoon approaches!

    Hi Tomo,

    Happy birthday to your father! I hope your father will stay healthy.

    Good night,

    Yukako



  28. David Barker on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 10:52 PM

    Hi YU,

    It should be “as long as the government borrows.” I wasn’t correcting that sentence; just commenting on the content.



  29. Biwa on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 10:54 PM

    Hi David,

    I should have written “You’re right” instead of “Your right.” Sorry!

    I hope nothing bad will happen to all of the members for this typhoon. The news is telling us that a lot of people are taking shelter at “kominkans.” I also hope that the rice and vegetable fields and orchards won’t suffer damage before harvest!

    Good night, everyone!



  30. YU on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 11:03 PM

    Hi David,

    > It should be “as long as the government borrows

    Thank you for your correction.

    > I wasn’t correcting that sentence; just commenting on the content.

    Sorry, I’m so slow that I can’t get what you mean by this.
    I just wanted compare my sentence with yours because there are “as long as” in both sentences by chance.
    What I actually wanted to know was that if there are cases you use “past tense verb” after “as long as” or not.



  31. YU on Sunday September 30th, 2012 at 11:12 PM

    Hi Tomo,

    Your father is very lucky to have lovely daughters like you! 🙂
    By the way, the expression “lunch out” was new to me. Thank you!

    Hi Yukako,

    I’m sorry for your mother.
    I hope she doesn’t catch a cold!



  32. Tomo on Monday October 1st, 2012 at 09:34 AM

    Thanks Yukako and YU 🙂

    YU, to tell the truth, it was the first time I had used the expression “eat lunch out.” I first wrote “ate out for lunch”, but I changed it. I just wanted use a new expression, so don’t trust me! LOL

    As for the usage of tense forms of “as long as”, I think it basically uses the present simple form, but if you are talking about the past or the hypothetical condition, it should be the past form. I think it is similar to the usage of “when/if.”

    For example:

    1. He doesn’t care as long as the pay is good.

    2. He didn’t care as long as the pay was good.

    3. He wouldn’t care as long as the pay was good.

    Sorry, if I’m wrong, but this is my understanding.

    Have a nice day, everyone!

    Tomo



  33. David Barker on Monday October 1st, 2012 at 11:33 AM

    Hi YU,

    Tomo’s explanation is correct. Thanks Tomo.