Skip to content

[wpaudio url=”https://www.btbpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Sorry-I-was-drunk.mp3″ text=”Click to listen”]

If you read the comments on the crime stories on the Japan Today website, you will begin to notice some stereotypes that people from other countries have about the Japanese justice system. One of these is that whenever someone commits a crime, they just seem to say, “I was drunk, and I don’t remember anything.”

I think the impression that people from other countries have is that this tends to be used a lot as an excuse for bad behaviour in Japan. More to the point, however, it also seems to be accepted as an excuse for bad behaviour.

The latest example of this was the TV announcer who was arrested for groping a young girl on a train last week. Unsurprisingly, his “excuse” (as reported on the Japan Today website) was, “I was drunk, and I don’t remember what I did.”

Of course, people get drunk and do stupid things in other countries too, but I think there tends to be less acceptance of this as an excuse. Kattie may be able to help me out here, but I seem to remember studying this in my law classes in university. I think the principle is that getting drunk is a conscious choice, so the effect of alcohol cannot be taken into account as a mitigating factor if you commit a crime. Basically, you will get the same punishment for doing something when you were drunk as you would get for doing it when you were sober.

I thought this might be an interesting topic for us to discuss, so here is a quick survey. I have only included simple answers here, so please feel free to write more detail in your comments.

[polldaddy poll=6718187]

Of course, if you have any interesting stories of your own, I’m sure everyone would love to hear those too!

このブログは英語学習者のためのものです。レベルの高い人もいれば、初心者もいますので、自分のレベルや学習経験を気にする必要はありません。「いつもコメントを書いている人は仲間みたいだから参加しにくい」と思う方もいるかもしれませんが、勇気を出してコメントを書いてみてください。必ず温かく迎えてもらえます。多くのコメントは英語で書かれていますが、もちろん日本語もOKですし、英語と日本語を混ぜて書いても大丈夫です。言いたいことが言えないときは、How do you say 「〜」in English? と聞けば、きっとだれかが教えてくれると思います。私のエントリー、または他のメンバーのコメントの中に分からないところがあったら、「”…”はどういう意味ですか?」と遠慮なく聞いてください。このブログで使われているフレーズや表現をたくさん吸収すると、より自然な英語に近づけることができますよ!

コメントを投稿するときは、名前とメールアドレス、メールアドレス欄下に表示される4文字の英数字(CAPCHA code)を入れてください。 最初のコメントは承認後の公開になりますが、2回目からはそのまま投稿できます。

※メールアドレスは公開されません。

※CAPCHA codeは時間切れになることがあります。コード右上の矢印で更新してから入力してください。

※ブログの更新のお知らせはFacebookまたはTwitterで!Facebookでは「いいね!(Like)」ボタンを、Twitterでは「フォローする(Follow)」ボタンを押して下さい。

57 Comments

  1. YU on Monday November 26th, 2012 at 07:47 PM

    今週のエントリーの和訳です。
    ざっとしか訳してないので間違いがいっぱいあると思います。
    すみません。

    If you read the comments on the crime stories on the Japan Today website, you will begin to notice some stereotypes that people from other countries have about the Japanese justice system. One of these is that whenever someone commits a crime, they just seem to say, “I was drunk, and I don’t remember anything.”
    Japan Todayの犯罪記事に寄せられたコメントを読んでいると外国人たちが日本の司法制度に関して抱いているいくつかの固定観念に気づき始めることでしょう。そのひとつは誰かが犯罪を犯すといつも決まって「酔っていて何も憶えてません」、と言っているようだ、というものです。

    I think the impression that people from other countries have is that this tends to be used a lot as an excuse for bad behaviour in Japan. More to the point, however, it also seems to be accepted as an excuse for bad behaviour.
    外国人たちはこれが日本では悪いことをした場合の言い訳として頻繁に使われている、という印象を持っていると私は思います。しかしもっと重要なのは、しかもそれが悪いことをしたときの弁解として「認められているようだ」、ということなのです。

    The latest example of this was the TV announcer who was arrested for groping a young girl on a train last week. Unsurprisingly, his “excuse” (as reported on the Japan Today website) was, “I was drunk, and I don’t remember what I did.”
    一番最近だと先週電車の中で若い女性に痴漢行為をして逮捕されたテレビ局アナウンサーの例があります。そのときの彼の「言い訳」がまた、(Japan Todayのウェブサイトに報道されているように)「酔っていて自分が何をしたか憶えていません」というものでした。別に驚きはしませんけどね。

    Of course, people get drunk and do stupid things in other countries too, but I think there tends to be less acceptance of this as an excuse.
    もちろん他の国だって人は酔っ払ってとんでもない馬鹿なことをしでかすこともあります。が、外国ではそれ(酔い)は言い訳として日本ほど容認されない傾向にある、と私は思います。

    Kattie may be able to help me out here, but I seem to remember studying this in my law classes in university.
    ここはKattieがあとで補足して説明してくれるかもしれませんが、私も大学の法学の授業でこれについて勉強したような記憶があります。

    I think the principle is that getting drunk is a conscious choice, so the effect of alcohol cannot be taken into account as a mitigating factor if you commit a crime.
    原則は、「酔っ払う」というのは(本人が)自覚して選択した行為である。だからアルコールによる影響は犯罪を犯した場合に(刑事責任を)軽減させる要因として考慮されない、ということだったと思います。

    Basically, you will get the same punishment for doing something when you were drunk as you would get for doing it when you were sober.
    (ですから)基本的には、酔っ払って何か(悪いことを)したとしても、しらふの時と同等の刑罰を受ける、ということになります。

    I thought this might be an interesting topic for us to discuss, so here is a quick survey. I have only included simple answers here, so please feel free to write more detail in your comments.
    これは面白いトピックになるのでは、と考えました。こちらはクイックアンケートです。ここには簡単な選択肢しか載せなかったのでコメントでもっと詳しい意見を自由に述べてください。

    人は酔っ払っているときの行為に関して責任があると思いますか?

    -Yes. You are always responsible for your actions whether you are drunk or not.
    はい。酔っ払っていようがいまいがいつも責任がある。

    -It depends. In some cases, alcohol should be accepted as a mitigating factor.
    時と場合による。アルコールが刑事責任を軽減する要因として認められるべき場合もある。



  2. David Barker on Monday November 26th, 2012 at 07:50 PM

    Thanks YU.



  3. Biwa on Monday November 26th, 2012 at 10:04 PM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for the reply. I checked my grammar book once more (I should have done it before!) and I think I got it. For the short responses, I’m going to follow your advice!

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for the translation. I think it’s perfect as always!

    Hi everyone,

    I think people are 100% responsible for their actions whether they are drunk or not. I hate to say this, but I think that the tendency of people saying “I was drunk” as an excuse for doing something unusual has lots to do with the cowardliness of people.
    Sometimes “getting drunk” seem to change those people bold enough to chat up or even grope girls as the announcer’s case, or to say things to people they can’t when they are sober. This is really disgusting and I don’t think the excuse is accepted at all!

    If it is true that lots of Japanese people tend to think that way, that means their/our? frustration (of not being able to do or say things they really want to) are bottled up in a very crooked way, and that is a very sad thing to admit.



  4. YU on Monday November 26th, 2012 at 10:48 PM

    Hi everyone,

    I think you are always responsible for your actions whether you are drunk or not, but I’m not very sure about some cases – when someone is an alcoholic and when someone was forced to drink.

    Apparently, “being drunk” is divided into 3 types(単純、複雑、病的酩酊) in the Japanese justice system, and the last two can be taken into account as a mitigating factor if you commit a crime. Here is the article I referred to ;

    “一般的に酒に酔っているからといって、責任能力に影響を与えるということにはなりません。酩酊の状態は単純酩酊と異常酩酊に分けられ、異常酩酊はさらに複雑酩酊と病的酩酊に分けられます。複雑酩酊は単純酩酊と質的差がなく、酩酊中は怒りやすく刺激的になり、興奮の程度が長く持続して乱暴な行動をするとのことです。病的酩酊は少ししかお酒を飲んでいない場合でも強い意識障害に陥り、激しい精神運動興奮とともに、不安、恐怖、激怒、凶暴性、幻覚、妄想などを覚え、攻撃的な行動をとるとのことです。単純酩酊は完全責任能力として、複雑酩酊は限定責任能力として、病的酩酊は責任無能力として扱われます。”(東京弁護士法律事務所サイトより)

    >I think the impression that people from other countries have is that this tends to be used a lot as an excuse for bad behaviour in Japan.

    I think they’re right.

    > More to the point, however, it also seems to be accepted as an excuse for bad behaviour.

    I have a feeling that it might be accepted in the Japanese justice system, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that it is also accepted in Japanese society.
    In fact, I’m always disgusted with those excuses. I personally think it can’t be an excuse because you have drunk before and you know how much you can drink. So, as David studied in his law classes, I think that getting drunk is a conscious choice.

    In NHK announcer’s case, I don’t know if he will be fired or not, but I don’t feel like watching the news program anchored by him.



  5. Anne on Monday November 26th, 2012 at 11:23 PM

    Hi David and everyone,

    I was away in Turkey for ten days, and when I got back, the news which surprised most was not “the resignation of the Noda Cabinet” but “the arrest of the TV announcer.” I like his morning TV news show. He looked nice and cheerful.

    Actually, as David mentioned, in Japan this kind of excuse is often heard when someone commits a crime. Furthermore, in Japan, we used to have a kind of tacit understanding(暗黙の了解)”まあ酒の上の出来事だから。。。” It literally means, “Well, it was happened because he or she was drunk.” It also implies even though he or she does something stupid, even sexual harassment or something disgraceful, that person’s behavior is forgiven.

    I guess this cultural tradition is one of the reasons that people use this magic sentence “I was drunk.” Having said that, this excuse is no longer accepted at the year-end party or some other parties.

    Of course,, this kind of behavior should not be allowed whether it’s a crime or not, and in the case of the crime, the situation is more serious.

    Anyway, even though he or she doesn’t remember afterwards, I think his or her behavior is a conscious choice. I also asume he or she could have such a desire more or less unknowingly.

    It’s sad that he(that announder) could not destress somewhere else. He should have been mindful of his behavior and should have steered clear of this crime. Anyway, as David mentioned, this excuse should not be accepted as a mitigating factor for the crime.

    Hi YU,
    Thanks for the translation as always!

    Hi Biwa,
    Your sons survied nicely? OH, then it’s the first step for you to stay away from home some time in the near future.

    Hi amo,
    Thanks for having a look at my photos on the facebook page.

    Good night,

    Anne



  6. Anne on Monday November 26th, 2012 at 11:25 PM

    it’s me again.
    “the news which surprised most” should be “the news which surprised me most”



  7. Biwa on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 09:46 AM

    Hi YU and everyone,

    Thanks for the interesting article. I guess this law is properly applied for very few cases, as always, and mostly used as a loophole to escape punishment. I think so because so many crimes commited by people when they’re drunk seem to be clouded.

    By the way, when I think about these being-drunk-crimes(I’m not sure about this expression), it always reminds me of other nasty people like those who take peeping films with their mobile phones.
    I’m not sure about other countries, but I think this is another case that reveals people’s crooked frustration. Also, it’s funny because those crimes are mostly commited by men. I’m not a feminist at all, but I’m really worried as a mother of two boys! Are men more sensitive to stress than women? But this doesn’t make sense because half of the people on earth are men!



  8. Yukako on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 12:57 PM

    Hi David and everyone,

    I think this topic is one of the problems we have in Japan, and we must make a decision on this problem.
    There are many traffic accidents in Japan. Some of these happened because of drunk-drivers. I think they should be punished more severely!

    >I think the principle is that getting drunk is a conscious choice, so the effect of alcohol cannot be taken into account as a mitigating factor if you commit a crime.

    That’s it! Whether we drink or not, we must accept the responsibility for our action. If people don’t want to accept the responsibility, they must not drink! We should control ourself.

    Hi YU,
    Thank you for your translation. It’s very useful for me!

    Hi Anne,
    > in Japan, we used to have a kind of tacit understanding(暗黙の了解)”まあ酒の上の出来事だから。。。”

    Exactly. We also say ” 今夜は無礼講 ” It’s a magic word because most of impolite actions are forgiven thanks to this word.



  9. YU on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 03:10 PM

    Hi Anne, Yukako, Biwa and everyone,

    > Having said that, this excuse is no longer accepted at the year-end party or some other parties.

    I agree.
    Today, I think almost no one believes that the magic word(「酒の上のことだから」「今夜は無礼講」) still works as an excuse for their bad behavior.
    私もそう思います。
    今の世の中そういう言葉の効力を未だに本気で信じている人なんているでしょうか?

    If you still believe it and do something stupid like sexual harrasment, you are just an outdated, foolish person.
    もしいて未だにセクハラのようなバカな行為をやっている人がいるとしたら、その人は時代遅れのただのアホでしょう。

    It is certainly true that people who commited a crime often say “I was drunk, and I don’t remember anything.”, but I guess they just say so because that is the fact. I don’t think they expect their punishment would be reduced because of the word.
    確かに犯罪者が逮捕されたあとに「酔っていて何も覚えていない」とよく言っているのは事実だと思います。でもそれはただそれが事実だからなのでは?私は彼らがそう言うことによって罪が軽くなると考えているとは思いませんが。

    In fact, according to the article I showed, the excuse “getting drunk” is accepted as a mitigating factor only for very few special cases in the Japanese justice system, as Biwa pointed out.
    事実私が示した記事によると、日本の司法システムにおいても「酩酊」が刑事責任の軽減の要因になることはほとんどなさそうですし。Biwaが指摘しているように。

    Crime reports usually tell us what the criminals deposed after being arrested and I think “I was drunk, and I don’t remember anything.” is only a little part of their deposition.
    犯罪事件の報道は犯罪者が逮捕後どんなことを供述しているかを私たちに教えてくれますが、犯罪者たちの「酔っていて覚えていない」という言葉は彼らの供述のほんの一部に過ぎないのではないでしょうか?

    Of course, I’m not siding with criminals, though…
    もちろん犯罪者たちの肩を持っているわけではありませんが。



  10. David Barker on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 04:16 PM

    I’m still waiting for the “Once, when I was really drunk…” stories! As I hardly ever drink, I’m afraid I don’t really have any to share, but I’m sure some of you must have some good ones!



  11. Yukako on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 04:49 PM

    Hi YU,

    >It is certainly true that people who commited a crime often say “I was drunk, and I don’t remember anything.”, but I guess they just say so because that is the fact.

    I don’t like alcohol, so I don’t know what happens to people who is really drunk. Don’t they really remember anything?
    As David said, I want someone to share their secret stories about alcohol!



  12. YU on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 05:45 PM

    Hi Yukako,

    > I don’t like alcohol, so I don’t know what happens to people who is really drunk. Don’t they really remember anything?

    Please don’t ask me because I don’t drink much.
    I’ve never been drunk so much as losing all my memory. Just I wonder why they can always reach their home although they don’t remember anything.
    (Those people also often say, “I can’t remember how I got home last night at all!) However, that is probably a different kind of memory.
    私もあまり飲まないので知りません。記憶がなくなるほど飲んだこともないし。ただなんで何も覚えていないのに家にたどり着けるのかはナゾです。(そういう人たちって「夕べどうやって家に帰ったか全然覚えてない!」、ともよく言ってますね。)でもおそらくそういうのはまた違ったタイプの記憶なのでしょうね。

    Hi David,

    I’d like to share “Once I was really drunk…” story, but I really don’t have any. Most of writers here are women, so it might be a bit difficult to hear those stories…



  13. Kimi on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 07:40 PM

    Hi David and everyone,

    I’m exposing what happened to me when I was drunk. In fact, I have a very low tolerance of alcohol. When I was young and shallow, I believed that drinking much would increase alcohol tolerance and tried to drink as much as possible for some time. I threw up almost every time. When I drank comfortably, I sometimes did stupid things.

    酔っぱらった私がどうなったか、暴露します。(汗)実は、私はとてもお酒が弱いです。浅はかだった私は若かりし頃「慣れれば強くなる」そう信じて、しばらく許容範囲を超えて飲む訓練(?)をしていました。だいたい戻します。(すみません、汚い表現で)しかし、まれに体調を損なわず気持ちよく飲んでいるときは、とんでもないことをしでかします。

    They were divided into 2 patterns. One was that I did it by being bold as Biwa and Anne mentioned. Another was that I did it by not being able to control myself probably due to stress.

    そのとんでもないことは、2つのパターンにわかれます。1つはBiwaやAnneが指摘しているように、気持ちが大きくなることでしでかすパターン。もう1つは、おそらくストレスが原因だと思うのですが、自分の行動が制御不能となるパターンです。

    The first pattern. I am not good at speaking in public. However, I could say “私が締めます” and tried to take the leadership even in the presence of my boss when I drank too much. At the end, I asked my co-workers to toss me up in the air and they did it outside.

    1のパターン。私は人前で話すのが苦手です。でも、飲みすぎると上司の前でも平気で「私が締めます」なんて言ってのけて、宴会を仕切ろうとすることがありました。挙句の果てに「胴上げをしてくれ」と頼み、外でやってもらったこともあります。

    The second pattern. When I enjoyed seeing cherry blossoms with colleagues in a park, I drank comfortably. At the time to bring it to an end, I suddenly burst into tears. People around me were surprised and some were upset. I myself didn’t know why I was crying.

    2のパターン。公園で会社の人たちとお花見をしていたとき、私は気分よく飲んでいました。そしていよいよお開きとなったとき、私は突然大声を上げて泣き始めたのです。皆驚いて、どうしたものかとオロオロしている人もいました。自分でもなぜ泣いているのかわからないのです。

    As you know here, I remember all. I’ve never t lost my memory.

    さて、ここでお気づきかと思いますが、私は全て記憶しているのです。記憶がなくなることはありません。

    Since I wrote “pattern”, I suppose you could say “You’ve done many stupid things”, but I did such things only two times. Definitely. Trust me.

    パターンなんて書いたので、よほど色々やらかしたとお思いでしょうが、大きくはこの2回くらいです。ほ、本当です。Trust me.(すっかりこの言葉は信用されなくなりましたが)

    After some time, I’ve finally realized that not being able to handle my alcohol tolerance was heredity. Now I seldom drink. So I hope you won’t hate me. This happened many years ago.

    そして、しばらくのちに私はようやく「私が飲めないは遺伝」という結論に達しました。今は、滅多に飲みません。(月に1回も飲みません)だから安心してください。(何を?)嫌われなければいいのですが・・・。これは大昔の話ですから。

    If it offended you, I’m sorry.
    もし気分を害された方がいらっしゃったら、ごめんなさい。

    Kimi



  14. Kimi on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 07:56 PM

    Hi YU,

    Thank you for translating the topic. It’s very helpful for me as always.



  15. YU on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 08:49 PM

    Hi Kimi,

    Thank you for your stories.

    >As you know here, I remember all. I’ve never t lost my memory.
    >さて、ここでお気づきかと思いますが、私は全て記憶しているのです。記憶がなくなることはありません。

    I think you remember all what you did because you CAN’T drink so much as you lose your memory in the first place, I’m afraid…
    記憶がなくなる事がないのはそもそも記憶がなくなるほどお酒を飲めないからではないですか?体質的に。。。

    By the way, I’m watching “なかよしテレビ” now. They’re discussing whether Japanese schools should start teaching English earlier. It’s very interesting!



  16. Biwa on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 09:27 PM

    Hi Kimi and everyone,

    Kimi, thanks for sharing your stories! Why should we hate you??? I bet everyone loves hearing those stories!

    David, I don’t know why, but I never imagined that you hardly ever drink! Perhaps that is because I have a very stereotypical image as Britain=pubs!

    For me, just a glass to enjoy the meal is enough, but as Kimi said, I tried to drink a lot when I was young. However, I just fell asleep before doing something unusual, so that might mean I didn’t remember anything! Anyway, I’m not a real drinker at all, so I’m afraid I don’t have any funny stories to share…

    Hi YU,

    Are they saying they should start teaching earlier?



  17. Fumie on Tuesday November 27th, 2012 at 10:46 PM

    Hi David and everyone,

    You are absolutely right. Getting drunk is a conscious choice and it shouldn’t be used as an excuse for bad behavior and demeanor under the influence of alcohol should be properly punished. Some people relieve stress by drinking alcohol but they should drink moderately. Alcohol makes people, angry, happy, sad and people do stupid things or unforgivable acts sometimes.
    I don’t drink much so I’ve never drank as much as I don’t remember anything. But I remember my friend told me about his dad when we were children. Once her dad came home drank, he peed after he opened the door of the closet. Can you guess why he did that? He mistook closet as loo.
    I saw the scenes on TV or movies which a woman and a man are very surprised to see her/him sleeping next to him/her when they wake up. They don’t remember anything because they were drunk. I wonder is it possible? Does people sleep with someone unconsciously when they are drunk?
    私はあまり飲まないので、何も覚えてないほどまで飲んだことがありません。子供の時、友達のお父さんが酔って帰ってきて押入れのドアを開け、小をしてしまった話を聞いたのを覚えてます。酔ってトイレと押入れのドアを間違えたらしいです。テレビや映画で男女が目が覚めてベットの横に相手が寝てるのを見て驚くシーンがありますが、酔って意識がないまま誰かと寝てしまうことなんてありえるんでしょうか?

    Hi Kimi,

    Thank you for sharing an interesting story!

    Fumie



  18. Biwa on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 08:52 AM

    Hi everyone,

    I’m not sure if I should have used “hear” or “listen to” for my sentence to Kimi. The word “stories” makes me feel I should have said “everyone loves listening to those stories”.
    >I bet everyone loves hearing those stories!

    For this sentence which I wrote to Kattie, I think it’s okay, but could anyone check it for me?
    >I love to hear how things go on in other countries!



  19. Biwa on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 10:03 AM

    Hi Fumie,

    >Does people sleep with someone unconsciously when they are drunk?

    Well, I don’t say “unconsciously”, but after a party at home or at my friend’s house, I used to see all of my friends sleeping here and there on the floor in the morning! lol! Of course, they were all friends so we weren’t sleeping with strangers at least.



  20. YU on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 12:29 PM

    Hi Fumie,

    > I saw the scenes on TV or movies which a woman and a man are very surprised to see her/him sleeping next to him/her when they wake up. They don’t remember anything because they were drunk. I wonder is it possible? Does people sleep with someone unconsciously when they are drunk?

    I have seen scenes like that many times, too. I’m not sure if it could be true, but at least no one around me has ever told me that kind of stories. Or maybe they are just hiding it???
    そういうシーンは私も何度も見たことがあります。(女性のほうが先に目が覚めて布団の中で自分が何も着てないのを見てとなりの男に「まさかなんか変なことしてないでしょうね!」って詰め寄るパターン。でもお前も同罪だろ、と言いたいけど!)
    そういうことが本当に起こりうるのかは経験したことがないので分かりませんが、とりあえず私の周りの人間でそういうことになった、って話は聞いたことないです。もしかして恥ずかしすぎて隠しているだけかもしれないですが。

    For me it is hard to imagine that someone(in TV dramas, mostly they are a stranger or someone who you met on the previous night for the first time) is sleeping beside me when I wake up. However, lots of people do the same thing “consciously” in this world. That is more unacceptable for me!!
    私は起きたら誰か知らない人(ドラマの場合ほとんどのケースが全然知らない人か前夜に初めて会った人)が隣に寝ている、という状態を想像できないけれど、同じことを酔った状態じゃなく、「きちんと自覚して」やっている人はこの世の中にたくさんいますよね。私の周りでもそういう人はいましたよ。私はそっちのほうがもっと信じられないけど!!

    Hi Biwa,

    > Are they saying they should start teaching earlier?

    Some said they should, but others said it didn’t make sense at all.
    What surprised me the most was the fact that the English speaking ability of Japanese people was 162nd of 162(countries)!
    Given that this is true, we certainly should change our English education, but I don’t know if it’s a matter of “starting time” or “quality of English education”.
    早く始めるべきという人もいれば、いや、それは間違い、という人もいました。
    一番驚いたのは日本人のスピーキング能力が162カ国中最下位の162位、という調査結果でした。
    もしこれが本当なら何か手を打つべきだと思います。でも「英語教育の開始時期」の問題なのか「英語教育の質」の問題なのか、よくわかりません。

    I also learned from the program that 1st-grade pupils in Osaka city will start taking English lessons at scool from next April! Did you know that?
    Apparently, Mr.Hashimoto is for early English education whilst Mr.Ishihara is against it.
    あと、大阪市では来春から小1から英語の授業が始まるそうです。知ってました?橋下市長は英語早期教育推進派らしいです。石原氏は全く逆で反対派らしいですが。

    Have you ever heard of 勝間和代?
    She speaks pretty good English.
    She said, “I started learning English from kindergarten, but I was not able to speak at all even after graduating from high school.
    After graduating from university I restarted studying English conversaton and learned to speak like now.”
    I can’t speak English as good as her, but I thought she was talking about me!
    Mr. Ishihara said almost the same, he started English when he was very small, but it was nothing for him.
    勝間和代さんて知ってますか?
    彼女はかなり英語が達者みたいです。
    彼女がその番組の中で、「幼稚園から英語教育を受けたけど、高校卒業しても全くしゃべれるようにならなかった。ゼロでした。大学卒業後に英会話を勉強して今のように話せるようになった」と言ってました。
    私は彼女ほど上手に話せないけど、「勝間さん、私のこと話してるの?」って思ってしまいました。
    石原氏も幼少期から英語教育を受けたらしいですが、全くモノにならなかったそうです。

    After all, I felt it is rather a matter of “the quality of English classes at school” than “the starting time of English classes”.
    番組を見て、やっぱり「開始時期」より「質」なのかな~って気がしてきました。

    Of course, if you start taking “good quality of English classes” “in early stage” might be the best, though!
    もちろん質のいい英語の授業を早期に開始するのがベストなのかもしれませんが!



  21. Kimi on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 01:44 PM

    Hi David,

    I’ve found a mistake in the Practice Test. In Section 2, you’ve written ’homeStown’ not ‘hometown’. This tool is very good!



  22. David Barker on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 01:56 PM

    Thanks Kimi. I just corrected that. Please let me know if you find anything else.

    By the way, some people mentioned that they wanted to see all the questions and all the answers, and I thought of a way you could do that. Instead of “practice,” click on “Test maker.” Choose the sections and number of questions you want to include in the test, and then click on PDF. Print the page on your printer and do the test with a pen or pencil. Click on “Answers” to print the answer sheet. You can use the answer sheet to check your answers when you have finished.



  23. YU on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 02:10 PM

    【correction】
    > 162nd of 162(countries)!
    – 162nd out of 162(countries)!

    Hi David and everyone,

    I have a feeling that most people say “I was drunk, and I don’t remember what I did/said VERY WELL.”, not “I don’t remember ANYTHING.”.

    Hi wifes!

    May I ask you a stupid question?

    Please imagine your husband had an affair last night.
    Which is better?

    1. He was dead drunk.

    2. He was sober.

    Of course, I don’t want my husband to be unfaithful to me, but case 1 is slightly better for me. How about you? And why?



  24. amo on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 02:15 PM

    Hi David,

    You know what, every time I tell my family name(it’s one of typical Okinawan names) or where I am from, most of the people say to me “You must be a big drinker” or “You like drinking” 🙁
    I have to admit that I can drink but I am just a social drinker, and I don’t like drunks. I go to movies with friends sometimes and they like drinking. So after watching movies we usually go for a drink. Luckily I have never had any bad experiences relate to drinking. They told me that they have drunk a lot, and ended up throwing up several times, but I’ve never heard they have done something bad.
    Now I remember that I know two women who LOVE drinking. Yes, they used to say “I can’t remember how I got home last night” or something like that. They are nice people when they are sober and I didn’t know that they are bad drinkers. I went for a drink with them about one year ago. They wouldn’t stop drinking so other friend and I left them and went home. Next day, one of them told me that she didn’t remember whether she paid or not previous night. After this, other friend and I decided that we should be careful when we go for a drink with them. Or should I say, we decided to avoid going for a drink with them as much as possible. I should stop before I got off the track. Anyway, I think that you are always responsible for your actions whether you are drunk or not. I don’t like to hear people use “I was drunk so I don’t remember anything….” to excuse for their bad behavior. But I thought that this is the same in other countries, because I hear those excuses when I watch foreign TV dramas. Maybe I watch too much TV dramas, and those things wouldn’t happened in the real world??

    Hi Kimi,

    Thanks for sharing your stories with us and I really enjoyed reading them 🙂 I especially like that you asked your co-workers to toss you up in the air.

    Hi YU,

    >It is certainly true that people who commited a crime often say “I was drunk, and I don’t remember anything.”, but I guess they just say so because that is the fact. I don’t think they expect their punishment would be reduced because of the word.
    I pretty much agree with you. Maybe they just want to say “I can’t explain what happened because I was drunk and don’t remember anything at all.”

    amo



  25. David Barker on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 02:17 PM

    Hi YU,

    That’s an interesting question! I’m looking forward to reading the answers.

    The word “affair” suggests an ongoing relationship, though. I think the correct term here would be “a one-night stand.”

    Hi Biwa,

    “Everyone loves listening to those stories” and “Everyone loves hearing those stories” are both okay.

    For this sentence which I wrote to Kattie, I think it’s okay, but could anyone check it for me?
    >I love to hear how things go on in other countries!

    That is fine too.



  26. David Barker on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 02:24 PM

    By the way, I remembered one more thing about alcohol that has always puzzled me. In my country (and in lots of other countries too), drunk people are often violent, but I have never seen that in Japan. I don’t think Japanese people even make a connection between violence and alcohol. I wonder why that is.



  27. YU on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 03:12 PM

    Hi David,

    > I think the correct term here would be “a one-night stand.”

    Thank you for your correction!

    > but I have never seen that in Japan

    I think Japanese people get drunk and become violent, too. I’ve heard stories about “酒浸りの父親が母親に暴力を振るう” or “酔っぱらい同士のケンカ” many times! However, the percentage might be less compared to other countries, as you say.
    日本人の中にも酔っ払って暴力的になる人はいると思います。酒浸りの父親の母親に対する暴力(DV)、酔っぱらい同士のケンカの話などもよく耳にしますし。でも他国に比べて割合が少ない、というのはもしかするとそうなのかもしれません。

    > I don’t think Japanese people even make a connection between violence and alcohol. I wonder why that is.

    I do, at least.
    By the way, I’ve heard that Westeners have enzymes to break down alcohol by nature so they can drink a lot, but more than half of Japanese people don’t have them so we get drunk easily and become just rather “weak”(sleepy, careless, lose memory)after drinking than becoming violent?!
    少なくとも私は連想します。
    ところで欧米人は生まれつきアルコールを分解する酵素を持っているからお酒に強いけど、日本人の半数以上はそれがなくて遺伝子的にお酒に弱い、という話を聞いたことがあります。だから日本人はお酒を飲むと暴力的になるというより、むしろ弱くなってしまう(眠くなったり、注意散漫になったり、記憶がなくなったり)するのかな、と思いますが、どうなんでしょう?



  28. David Barker on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 07:21 PM

    Did anyone see this story in the Japanese press? It’s quite fitting, given our topic this week!

    http://www.japantoday.com/category/crime/view/saitama-policeman-scratches-cars-in-drunken-rage



  29. Yukako on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 08:13 PM

    Hi David,

    I didn’t know that story! I found afresh there are many incidents caused by alcohol in Japan…

    Hi YU,

    >I’ve heard that Westeners have enzymes to break down alcohol by nature so they can drink a lot, but more than half of Japanese people don’t have them

    I’ve heard such story, too! If parents don’t drink, most of their children don’t drink. This shows the capacity to resolve alcohol has to do with genes.

    Hi Kimi,

    Thank you for sharing story!



  30. Biwa on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 09:25 PM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for checking my sentences. Glad to hear that both are okay!

    What a miserable policeman…why didn’t he just crash his car into his own house if he had problems at home?!!!

    Hi everyone,

    Regarding the connection between violence and alcohol, I think “getting drunk” reveals people’s true character or desire. Of course that is the fun part of drinking and that’s why you often drink with people you want to get closer to.
    Anyway, those people must have a desire to behave violently from the beginning. I’m not sure about the exact figure, but I think originally “gathering people” don’t have so much desire to behave violently or offensively as “hunting people”. (元々、採集民族だった人たちは狩猟民族であった人たちほど攻撃的な素質がないように思いますがどうでしょう・・・。)

    I’ve found an article which shows why Japanese cannot drink so much. The writer lives in Gifu, and he says there are relatively more non-drinkers in the middle part of Japan than in the other parts like Okinawa, Kyushu and Hokkaido.
    http://miraikoro.3.pro.tok2.com/study/mekarauroko/sakenituyoiyowai.htm



  31. Biwa on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 09:47 PM

    Hi YU,

    Thanks for letting me know about the TV program!

    >Of course, if you start taking “good quality of English classes” “in early stage” might be the best, though!

    I guess so! However, I always think that if you don’t really “need” or “want” to learn a language, you’ll never be able to use it. This is the most difficult part when teaching young children because they don’t really need to speak English in their daily life.
    Of course there are some advantages like pronunciation and intonation sounds more natural if they start learning when very young, but I think that is only a part of the language and the most important thing is that you have something you want to actually “say” in English. I kind of understand what 勝間さんsays.
    That’s why I 日々悩んでます。(I wonder how you say this in English) and I hope I’m doing something to make the children at least “like” English!



  32. Biwa on Wednesday November 28th, 2012 at 09:58 PM

    Hi YU,

    Your question is soooo difficult to answer!!!
    Well, I think if your husband were really dead drunk, wouldn’t it be impossible to have a one-night stand? Am I too optimistic?
    Anyway, if it was possible, I’d just hate such a miserable man who couldn’t do that without being drunk! So if I had to choose either, maybe I’d choose no.2!!! I’d like to hear answers from other members, too!



  33. YU on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 12:03 AM

    【correction】
    “Hi wifes!” should be “Hi wives!” correctly. Sorry.

    Hi Biwa,

    > This is the most difficult part when teaching young children because they don’t really need to speak English in their daily life.

    I agree.
    A little while ago, I asked mother members if their children lost their interest in English after entering the kindergarten. I think Fumie answered that her sons lost it.
    I guess it is because children realize that they need Japanese language than English to communicate with their friends.
    My son is still very interested in English, but I guess he will lose it soon or later when he starts kindergarten.

    > Well, I think if your husband were really dead drunk, wouldn’t it be impossible to have a one-night stand?

    Maybe I should have written “1. He was drunk.”.
    Anyway, whether it is possible to have a one-night stand or not when a man is dead drunk, I still prefer No.1 to No.2.
    多分”He was dead drunk”じゃなく、”He was drunk”と書いたほうが良かったかも。まあ男性が泥酔した状態で「できるか否か」という問題は置いといて、やっぱり私はNo.1の方が「マシ」です。

    If he were sober and had a one-night stand, wouldn’t it mean that he was conscious at the time, and you have been cheated by him?
    シラフで浮気したとしたらそれはその時夫はしっかり意識があったにもかかわらず自分が裏切られた、っていうことになりませんか?

    In No.1’s case, I’m not sure if he is telling me the truth, but I could take his behavior like “He was drunk, and he couldn’t judge well so he had a one-night stand. He is a man, so he just acted on man’s instinct.”.
    No.1の場合、夫が真実を言っているかどうかはわからないけど、その夫の行動を「酔っ払っていて正常な判断力を失っていたからそうなったんだ。男だから男性の本能のままに行動しただけ。」と解釈できるかもしれない。

    I know this is only my positive understanding, but I will be saved a bit at least if I think that way.
    もちろんそれが楽天的な解釈だとわかってはいますが、そう自分に思い込ませることで少しは救われる気がします。(私は)

    I’m looking forward to hearing other members’ answers!

    P.S. Thank you for the interesting article. I grew up in Shikoku. I think it is true that lots of people from 高知 can drink a lot, and probably so can people from other prefectures in Shikoku, too?!(FYI I’m not from 高知.)



  34. Fumie on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 05:58 AM

    Hi YU,

    >However, lots of people do the same thing “consciously” in this world. That is more unacceptable for me!!
    -I feel the same as you.
    Regarding your question, my answer is also NO.1 as same reason as you. But if husband had a one-night stand when he was really drunk and excused himself, “I was dead drunk and I don’t remember anything”, that is a forgivable act. もし夫がほんの気の迷いで浮気してしまったようだ。でも酔ってやったことで悪気はないからとか言い訳しても、許さるべき行為だと思います。

    Fumie



  35. David Barker on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 08:46 AM

    Hi everyone,

    We have added another Twitter button to the home page. Click on the Twitter logo that says “bitsofenglish” at the top right of the page, and that will take you to the bitsofenglish Twitter page. From there, you can see all my tweets in a list. You do not have to sign up to Twitter or be a member to see these.



  36. YU on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:41 AM

    Hi David,

    Thank you very much for adding the convenient button!
    It’s very useful for unskilful people like me!

    > I just heard that my favorite group are splitting up.

    In this case, “split up” means 「解散する」?

    Speaking of 「解散する」, I just heard that “Funky Monkey Babys(“Babies” correctly!) are splitting up next spring. Apparetly, DJケミカル, the leader of the band has decided to take over the family business and become the chief priest.

    Hi Fumie,

    > But if husband had a one-night stand when he was really drunk and excused himself, “I was dead drunk and I don’t remember anything”, that is a forgivable act. もし夫がほんの気の迷いで浮気してしまったようだ。でも酔ってやったことで悪気はないからとか言い訳しても、許さるべき行為だと思います。

    I’m wondering if you actually meant “an unforgivable act”=「許されざる行為」…, because you used “But” at the beginning of your sentence. Am I right?
    So, what you wanted to say was ;

    Even if my husband had a one-night stand and excused himself, “I was dead drunk, and I don’t remember anything.” , that still would be an unforgivable act for me, though.
    ???



  37. Fumie on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:53 AM

    Hi YU,

    Thank you for pointed out my awful mistake.
    Of course, forgivable should be unforgivable

    Fumie



  38. David Barker on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 10:40 AM

    Hi YU,

    It’s funny you should mention the Funky Monkey Babies. The reason I tweeted that sentence was that one of my students asked me this morning how to say it. She is a big fan of the Funky Monkey Babies.

    When students ask me things in class, or when I notice something that they are struggling to say, I usually write it on the white board. From today, I have decided to Tweet it as well. That means that students who follow me on Twitter won’t need to waste time copying from the board.



  39. Kimi on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 04:28 PM

    Hi David,

    I’ve found another mistake in Practice Test. In Section 3, you didn’t write any correction about “A: Have you finished yet? B: Finish.”



  40. David Barker on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 04:34 PM

    Hi Kimi,

    I’m not sure what you mean. I just checked the database, and there are three possible answers for that question. Can you explain a bit more?



  41. Kimi on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 04:43 PM

    Hi David,

    I typed wrong answer or typed nothing in box, and clicked on ‘Show Answer’. But, I couldn’t see correction.



  42. David Barker on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 04:44 PM

    Thanks. I’ll try it myself now.



  43. David Barker on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 05:41 PM

    Thanks Kimi. I see what you mean. I’ll report that to the programmers.



  44. Kimi on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:02 PM

    HI David,

    I’m glad to be of help.^^
    Can I ask you about the question “I have been sending 30 emails this afternoon!” in Section 4? The correct answer is “I have sent 30 emails this afternoon!” Could I also say “I sent 30 emails this afternoon!”? Then, you wrote “I slept at 10 o’clock last night. (p.268)” in Section 4, but I guess (p.268) is wrong. I don’t think this question has links with the explanation in p.286. I’ve noticed one more thing in Section 4. There is a question saying “Agbonze” and the correct answer is “I have to work hard, so I am always tired.” What is “Agbonze”?



  45. David Barker on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:10 PM

    Hi Kimi,

    Can I ask you about the question “I have been sending 30 emails this afternoon!” in Section 4? The correct answer is “I have sent 30 emails this afternoon!” Could I also say “I sent 30 emails this afternoon!”?

    Yes, you could.

    Then, you wrote “I slept at 10 o’clock last night. (p.268)” in Section 4, but I guess (p.268) is wrong. I don’t think this question has links with the explanation in p.286.

    I think it should be p. 271. Thanks for pointing it out.

    I’ve noticed one more thing in Section 4. There is a question saying “Agbonze” and the correct answer is “I have to work hard, so I am always tired.” What is “Agbonze”?

    That was a data entry mistake, but I think you mean section 5, right? I just corrected the data.



  46. Kimi on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:18 PM

    Hi David,

    I think I saw it in section 4, because I haven’t tried section 5 yet.



  47. David Barker on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:28 PM

    Hi Kimi,

    You must have clicked on Section 5 by mistake. I just went through the database for Section 4, and all the questions are correct. In Section 5, however, there was a question that just said “Agbonze.” Anyway, I have corrected it now, so thanks for pointing it out.



  48. Kimi on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:36 PM

    Hi David,

    Sorry for the trouble due to my mistake.



  49. Biwa on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 09:57 PM

    Hi Kimi,

    Wow! You’re a really hard worker Kimi. I think your name should be published on the “practice test” as the supervising editor!

    Hi Fumie,

    I took your sentence completely the other way round from what YU said. I thought you said you would forgive him if he had done that because of being drunk, and so your answer was No.1.

    Hi YU,

    >I know this is only my positive understanding, but I will be saved a bit at least if I think that way.

    Maybe we think completely differently! LOL! For me, both cases are the same that you are betrayed, but I can’t stand him doing that unconsciously. I think I would just lose interest in him at the very moment he says “I was drunk and I did it unconsciously.” そんな重大な裏切りを「無意識のうちにしてしまった・・・」などと言う男の人に対しては、その瞬間からこちらの方が興味がなくなってしまうかも。(笑)



  50. Biwa on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 10:32 PM

    Hi David,

    Thanks for the new button. By the way, does “You speak for yourself!” mean「勝手に言ってろ」?



  51. Anne on Thursday November 29th, 2012 at 11:28 PM

    Hi David and everyone,

    Wow! I was surprised to see lots of comments!

    Hi Kimi,
    Thanks for sharing your funny stories. (It might not be funny for you,though…) I liked them all, and I could easily visualize the scene:)

    Hi YU,
    As for your question, it’s difficult to answer which, but I don’t like the idea using an excuse for his unfaithful behavior.

    A glass of beer makes my heart pounding, so I don’t drink, but my husband drinks everyday. According to him, “A person who doesn’t know the joy of drinking is missing the delight in life.” I know it’s his excuse for drinking, but anyway, we talked about this week’s topic, and he said, “It’s OK doing stupid thing when he or she is drinking, but it couldn’t happen doing something disgraceful or sexual harassment without remembering anything. It’s a kind of “確信犯(conscious choice.)

    Well, let me share one story what happened to me.
    In my 40s, I was working at a health check company, and at one year-end party, my boss kissed me! I didn’t get what had happened to me, and I thought, “What the xxxx are you doing!”, but I didn’t say anything. As you know, in Japan, you(we?) don’t have a custom hugging or kissing with coworkers or friends, it was quite unusual. I didn’t slap her on her cheek because I knew she was drunk but was not dead drunk. Yes, it was not “He” but “She.” I was my first and maybe?last kiss with woman.

    Hi Fumie,
    You introduced several expressions from Twitter here, and thanks to you, I was able to catch the phrase “swamp” when I was watching a TV drama called “The Good Wife.”
    It said:
    “I need your help on this insurance case because I’m swamped.”( この保険ケース手伝ってくれないかしら。私は今手一杯だから。)
    Thank you!

    Hi David,
    Thank you for adding the new button for Twitter on this page. It’s very convenient.
    I tried making sentences using the phrases,”a means to an end” and “ballpark figure”. These are new to me, and does these make sense?

    *a means to an end (目的達成のための手段)
    1.Some students tend to think studying abroad is an end in itself, not a means to an end. Students should not be satisfied with that.
    (学生の中には、留学すること自体が、目的達成のための手段ではなく、目的となってしまうものもいる。 学生はそのことに満足すべきではない。)

    2.He wanted to start a business, so living on one thousand yen a day was a means to an end. He didn’t feel unhappy about bearing enough to live on.(彼は新たに商売を始めたいと思った。そのために、1日千円で暮らすことにした。 彼はぎりぎりの生活に不満は感じなかった。)

    *ballpark figure (概算)
    1. We asked a constructor to give us a ballpark figure for how much it would cost to renovate our kitchen and bathroom.(台所と浴室を改築するのに、どのくらいかかるのか、およその費用を出すように業者に依頼した。)

    Good night!

    Anne



  52. kattie on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 03:43 AM

    Hi David and everyone,

    > but I seem to remember studying this in my law classes in university. I think the principle is that getting drunk is a conscious choice, so the effect of alcohol cannot be taken into account as a mitigating factor if you commit a crime

    Sorry for the late reply on this – I think I mentioned that I read Law at university so I dimly remember studying this too! As you say there are a lot of crimes where being drunk cannot be used as a mitigating factor, these crimes are known as crimes of ‘basic intent’ – I think criminal damage is an example of such a crime. If someone gets drunk and in their drunken state, throws a stone through a shop window, I think it’s perfectly reasonable that they can’t argue that it wasn’t their fault because they were drunk!

    However, there are some crimes, for example murder, where a greater level of intention is needed – these crimes are known as crimes of ‘specific intent’ and in these cases intoxication can be used as a mitigating factor. Actually this is quite a complicated area and I am very rusty but I think a lot of the law has arisen from case law, as opposed to statute.

    Hi Biwa
    >I’ve found an article which shows why Japanese cannot drink so much.
    I have also heard this and when we have had Japanese guests we have noticed that they often get drunk much more easily than British people. It’s also true that British people drink a lot! there is rarely a social situation in Britain that doesn’t involve drinking and it’s quite unusual to come across someone (male or female) who is teetotal. Although pubs are still popular, more and more people are drinking at home with friends because it’s much cheaper – we often have people round for a drink in the evenings.

    How do you generally socialise with friends in Japan? Do you go to bars, have people round for a drink, play games or do some other activity? All our Japanese guests, to date, have been students so I don’t really know how working age or retired people in Japan spend their free-time in the evenings or at weekends.

    Hi Yu,
    My answer would definitely be No.1 because I wouldn’t worry that Tom had any particular feelings for the person so I wouldn’t take it too seriously. I’m pretty sure Tom would think the same too.



  53. Biwa on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 01:20 PM

    Hi Kattie,

    >How do you generally socialise with friends in Japan?

    I think it doesn’t differ so much from the way you do! Whenever and wherever people gather, we usually start from a glass of beer. Perhaps it’s just that there are more people that don’t drink so much or their faces turn red after drinking. Those people just change their glasses to other drinks like iced-tea, carbonated water, or whatever. We also have lots of non-alcoholic beers in Japan. Come to think of it, I rarely hear about those things in other countries!

    I’m not sure if more and more people are drinking at home, but as you say, it’s cheaper and people can relax and don’t have to worry about catching the last train! Besides, there seems to be a lot of men interested in cooking nowadays, so I think many people are gathering at home, too. We call them “home-parties”. Also, when my sons were small, I used to have lots of pot-luck-parties with my friends. It was nice because we didn’t have to worry about the children making noise or messing around the restaurant.



  54. Biwa on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 02:04 PM

    Hi Kattie,

    I forgot to ask you this.
    I’m not sure what you mean by “read Law at university”. And one more, the expression “be teetotal” was new to me, too!



  55. amo on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 02:32 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    >“read Law at university”
    I think it is just the same meaning of “study Law at university.”

    Bye for now,
    amo



  56. Biwa on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 03:10 PM

    Hi amo,

    Thanks! I think it’s like “major in” 専攻する. However, I thought it might have a special meaning or I should have laughed there because she said she dimly remebered studying that too.



  57. YU on Friday November 30th, 2012 at 03:49 PM

    Hi Biwa,

    My dictionary says that “read Law at university” means the same as “major/specialize in Law at university”.

    > Maybe we think completely differently! LOL!

    I think so!

    > For me, both cases are the same that you are betrayed, but I can’t stand him doing that unconsciously.

    I know what you mean, I like neither case, too, but I just feel No.1 is slightly better(「マシ」)!
    In my case, rather I can’t stand him doing that “CONSCIOUSLY”! That is more painful to me!
    Biwaの言っていることは正しいし、私もどちらのケースも嫌です。でもただやっぱりNo.1のほうがマシです。私の場合、そういうことをシラフでやられた方が堪えられないなあ。そっちのほうが悲惨だしつらい、女として。

    > I think I would just lose interest in him at the very moment he says “I was drunk and I did it unconsciously.” そんな重大な裏切りを「無意識のうちにしてしまった・・・」などと言う男の人に対しては、その瞬間からこちらの方が興味がなくなってしまうかも。(笑)

    I guess sorrow comes first rather than the disappointment in him. I’m not sure if I would lose interest in him at the very moment. I’ve experienced such a moment with my ex-boyfriends, though…
    私の場合彼に対する失望や怒りより裏切られた悲しみの方が先に来そう。(自己中だから!)。裏切られた瞬間に夫に対する興味を失うかと言われると多分それはなさそう。(もちろん今まで通りには信頼できないかもしれないけど)結婚前の交際相手に対しては浮気されたとわかった瞬間ビックリするほど愛情がなくなった、という経験はありますが。でも夫はちょっとそういうのとレベルが違うかな。

    Hi Anne,

    I wonder if your boss had been interested in you since long!!
    その女性上司、ずっとAnneを狙っていたのかしら?!

    A (female) friend of mine from Taiwan liked to walk hand in hand, but actally I always felt uncomfortable doing that with a woman!
    台湾人の女性の友達でいつも(トイレまで、外でも)手を繋いで歩きたがる子がいました。でも私はなんかそれがすごく気持ち悪いというか、いつも変な気分でした。

    Apparently, it is very common to walk hand in hand among women in her country like among friends, mothers and (grownup)daughters, or between (grownup)sisters.
    その子によると、台湾では女性同士で手を繋いで歩くのはごくフツーのことなんですって。友達同士、母娘(娘は成人)、成人した姉妹同士とか。面白いですね。

    Hi Kattie,

    > My answer would definitely be No.1 because I wouldn’t worry that Tom had any particular feelings for the person so I wouldn’t take it too seriously. I’m pretty sure Tom would think the same too.

    I totally agree with you. That is exactly what I meant! I guess most women would think the same way.
    私が言いたかったのはまさにそういうことです。ほとんどの女性はそういう考えじゃないかしら?

    Men often can sleep with women who are not his type at all when they are really drunk. Don’t you think so?
    男性って酔っ払っていると全然好みじゃない女性と寝てしまうことがよくあると思うんですが。どうでしょう?